A Reminder: There’s A Mary Petty Exhibit Happening in Pensacola

MPI was reminded today while reading an article that there is right this very moment an exhibit of Mary Petty’s work at the Pensacola Museum of Art. Here’s a link.

Shown here is my favorite cover of hers (I’ve no idea if it’s in the exhibit), and one of my favorite New Yorker covers of all-time (let’s say it’s in the top 100).

In that issue of August 4, 1945 are two cartoons by Ms. Petty’s husband, Alan Dunn as well as two by the great Helen Hokinson. Also in the issue are drawings by: Steinberg, Robert Day (a full page!), Whitney Darrow, Jr., Otto Soglow, Julian de Misky (a sequential drawing running over the gutter and onto the following page), Eric Ericson, Sam Cobean, Charles Addams, Garrett Price, Perry Barlow, and Chon Day. For anyone interested in why this era was called the golden age of New Yorker cartooning, seek out and enjoy the artistry of these contributors. (it’s available to New Yorker subscribers online; it’s also available on  the Complete New Yorker, and any library still holding bound New Yorkers).   

 

George Booth: An Ink Spill Appreciation

Screen+Shot+2016-06-30+at+12.21.02+AMAttempted Bloggery has been focusing on George Booth this past week (including a close look at the drawing shown here), and why not? Mr. Booth turned 90 the other day; what better time to sing his praises and talk about what he brought to the New Yorker when his work first  appeared in the magazine in 1969. Mr. Booth’s style was a brand new creature, unlike anything the magazine had published before.

Booth arrived at the tail end of a decade that saw the introduction of a tidal wave of new artists appearing in The New Yorker: J.B. Handelsman in 1961, Charles Barsotti in 1962, Edward Koren in 1962, Robert Weber in 1962, Henry Martin in 1964, Donald Reilly in 1964, Edward Frascino in 1965, Mort Gerberg in 1965, Peter Porges in 1965, Ronald Searle in 1966, Dean Vietor in 1967, Rowland B. Wilson in 1961, Vahan Shirvanian in 1968,  Sam Gross in 1969 and George Booth in 1969.

Looking at the dates of entry, one can see how carefully James Geraghty (the magazine’s Art Editor at the time; he was hired by Harold Ross as Art Editor in 1939) had  infused the magazine with new blood. These fifteen arrivals  were scattered  over the course of a decade, fitting easily into (and not displacing) the existing pool of talent. In the best tradition of the magazine’s art department, they all brought something of lasting value to the magazine.  Indeed, every one of them had long careers.

Mr. Booth was and is no exception. His use of reappearing characters is somewhat akin to  Helen Hokinson’s so-called “lunch ladies” and Syd Hoff’s Bronx families of the the 1930s as well as George Price’s eclectic characters appearing in his drawings all through his long career. Booth, however, revisits specific characters in his work, people we’ve come to know and in situations we’ve grown to love:  the man in the claw-foot bath tub, for instance, or the garage mechanics in their oily splotched coveralls, or Mawmaw, a character based on his mother.  Henry Martin once said to me that certain cartoonists “draw funny” (trust me, it’s a highly complimentary remark).  Booth draws funny.  Before you reach the caption, the drawing itself has already begun working on you the way the very thought  of Charlie Chaplin works on you. No one draws like Booth.  As a beginning cartoonist I found his graphic mastery intimidating.  But it was also, of course, highly educational.  Look at the way he’s drawn the ceiling and the ceiling fan in the drawing accompanying this piece; the inclusion of the floor boards found behind cafe counters; the characters in wash in the background.  Each one of those customers has a story.  The two cooks in the foreground (Laurel & Hardy types) are perfect, most especially the smaller fellow. This is a scene out of life filtered through Booth’s comic genes.  These elements of style are what Booth does best. Lee Lorenz (who succeeded James Geraghty as Art Editor in 1974) once said that the best cartoonists are the ones who bring their own world into their work. In all of his work for the magazine in all these years Booth has stayed true to his world. He is, by definition, one of the best.

 

More Booth:

Here’s a George Booth interview  conducted by Richard Gehr in 2013

and David Owen’s  Profile of Mr. Booth in The New Yorker in 1998

All of Mr. Booth’s cartoon collections can easily be found on AbeBooks.com

A selection of both Booth’s drawings and covers (and even a few products adorned with his drawings) can be found on The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site.

 

New Yorker Scrapbooks; Last College Humor Arnos From Attempted Bloggery

 

 

NYer Scrapbook 1931

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in 1931 The New Yorker published something called The New Yorker Scrapbook; unfortunately it contained zero cartoons, spots, covers, or illustrations. It’s a collection of writing from the then six year old magazine.

 

Over the years I’ve come across (either bought, or received as a gift) a number of scrapbooks containing clipped New Yorker art. In some cases they weren’t technically scrapbooks as the art wasn’t glued or pasted in a book, but stuffed in a manila folder. Those loose drawings are fun to look at,  but you need to dump them out like Pick up Stix before wading through (I won’t show those here). Below are a few more orderly examples from Ink Spill’s archives.

 

The first scrapbooks I ever encountered were in a small used bookstore (The Book Cave?) in Woodstock, New York. Two volumes of New Yorker covers, each a three ring binder such as a student would have in high school.  Someone had (unfortunately) used reinforcement hole protectors on every cover in the earlier binder.  The earliest cover, seen on the left, is dated November 24, 1928 (artist: Julian de Miskey) —  that’s a Helen Hokinson  cover on the right. The last cover in the binder, barely visible in the photo (it’s the pink cover peeking out from the bottom) was the last cover of the 1930s (artist: Charles Addams).

NYer Covers Scrapbook #1

 

 

 

 

 

The second volume, spared the hole reinforcements,  picked up in the 1940s.  Scrapbook #2Shown here: Rea Irvin‘s terrific cover of July 15, 1944 commemorating D-Day.

 

A more recent arrival to the Ink Spill archives (courtesy of a relative) is  dated 1939-1940. The scrapbook contains carefully arranged New Yorker spot drawings.  Though the pages are brittle the cover has  aged well as have the spots:

NYer Spots Scrapbook #1NYer Spots Scrapbook #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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IMG_0430Attempted Bloggery finishes up its week-long look at some of Peter Arno‘s work for College Humor. Kudos to Stephen Nadler for the great detective work resulting in this fine series.

The Women of The NY Comedy Fest Live-Drawn by Liza Donnelly; Cartoons For Victory Reviewed; Sipress Pencilled

LD Live Drawing Comedy FestFrom newyorker.com, November 18, 2015, Liza Donnelly‘s  “Live-Drawing the Women of the New York Comedy Festival”  — see the piece here

[left: Ms. Donnelly’s drawing of Yamaneika Saunders]

Liza Donnelly’s website.

 

 

 

 

 

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Here’s a review via Animation Scoop of the brand new Cartoons For Victory by Warren Bernard (Executive Director of The Small Press Expo and co-author of Eisner nominated Drawing Power).

This a large format hard cover book, filled with beautifully reproduced art.  A good number of New Yorker artists are represented including Charles Addams, Gardner Rea, Gregory d’Alessio, Gluyas Williams, Garrett Price, Helen Hokinson, John M. Price, Louis Jamme, Barbara Shermund, Perry Barlow, and more.

 

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tumblr_inline_nxk6i1JlKG1sj0qh6_500David Sipress discusses his tools of the trade and more on Jane Mattimoe’s A Case For Pencils blog.  See it here.

Auction of Interest: Swann Offers Numerous New Yorker Cartoons; Covers Calendar Noted; Video: Mankoff on Science of Humor

SwannSwann’s upcoming auction on January 22nd is chock full of New Yorker cartoons, with work by a number of the magazine’s giants.

Cartoons on the block by Steinberg, Mischa Richter, Barbara Shermund, William Steig, Richard Taylor, Edward Sorel, Victoria Roberts, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson, Rea Irvin, and Peter Arno.

Below: a beautiful early Steig included in the auction.

steig

Link here to see all the work and for all the auction info.

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Covers Cal

Ordinarily, New Yorker cartoon calendars, diaries, and the like aren’t listed here, but this sounds like it’s not your ordinary calendar, so I’m making an exception.

Here’s an excerpt from the publisher’s blurb for The New Yorker 365 Days of Covers Page-A-Day Gallery Calendar 2016:

“…this calendar features hundreds of the very best examples, all beautifully reproduced in full color. Here are iconic covers from Jean-Jacques Sempé, George Booth, Maira Kalman, Arthur Getz, Roz Chast, and the other illustrators whose work has helped shape The New Yorker’s inimitable style. Unprecedented quality with its exceptional art, coated paper, and exacting standards of color printing, this calendar is a gallery for your desk.”

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Bob

 

From Business Insider, December 31, 2014, this short video featuring The New Yorker’s Cartoon Editor, Bob Mankoff: “Scientists Discovered What Makes Something Funny”