Wednesday’s Spill: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Julia Suits on turning the page.  Ms. Suits began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist was Sara Lautman. Ms. Lautman began contributing to the magazine in 2016.

 

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Two New (Old) Additions To The Spill’s Cartoon Library

Just arrived here at Spill headquarters: two books from the 1940s (Madam Chairman, Members and Guests, from 1942, and I Feel Like A Cad, from 1944. I was curious about the Hokinson illustrated book because the title suggested the possibility of a book full of Hokinson drawings (Ms. Hokinson specialized in and became famous for her club lady drawings). Sadly, there are only six, all of them reprinted from The New Yorker. Still, a beautiful cover, and a good addition to the Hokinson illustrated book collection.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson (above) Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

 

The other book was acquired because I’d never seen a collection of cartoons* by (Sgt.) Larry Reynolds, a three time contributor to The New Yorker.  All three of his New Yorker drawings were published before this book came out (and do not appear here). I Feel Like A Cad consists of cartoons about Reynold’s bumbling burglaring cartoon character, Butch, whose exploits, at the time of the book’s publication, had appeared in Colliers Weekly for eight years.

The photo of Mr. Reynolds from the back of his book.

And a self-portrait of Mr. Reynolds that appeared, along with a jokey biography, in the anthology  Collier Collects Its Wits, published in 1941.

For a whole lot more on Mr. Reynolds, visit Allan Holtz’s Strippers Guide.

*Mr. Holtz mentions a book published in 1941, Lines Of Least Resistance:  “collected Reynolds’s cartoons from Collier’s, the Saturday Evening Post, the New Yorker and Elks Magazine.”

It’s apparently a book of poems by the author Laurence McKinney, with Reynolds drawings included as illustrations.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 6, 2020; A Spill Cartoonist List: Fun At First Sight

The Cover Artist: Kadir Nelson returns just two weeks after his stunning cover of June 22nd.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A double issue with eighteen cartoons by eighteen cartoonists (with two duo efforts: Bliss & Martin, Guerra & Boothby). There’s also a Sketchpad drawing from J.A.K., and a newbie in the midst: Patrick McKelvie. Mr. McKelvie is the tenth new cartoonist to join The New Yorker’s stable this year and the sixty-third brought in by cartoon editor Emma Allen since she was appointed in the Spring of 2017.

Here are some of the cartoons in this week’s issue that caught my eye: a classic  lighthouse light bulb drawing by great Sam Gross, and then perhaps my favorite Ellis Rosen drawing ever (so far!) — his cave people drawing (much like Mr. Gross’s lighthouse drawing) proves that there is plenty of humor to unearth in these favorite cartoon scenarios. Liana Finck’s tent basement is terrif, as is Amy Hwang’s great ice cream on the beach scene. Enjoyed Roz Chast’s six-squares (the way she uses language here reminds me of Bizarro Superman).  Lars Kenseth’s superhero is so much fun. Repeating myself here, but Mr. Kenseth’s drawings never fail to amuse me upon first sighting — I’m sold before I get to the caption.

Fun At First Sight:

Thinking of that kind of reaction has caused me to think about (and mention) some other New Yorker cartoonists whose styles alone have won me over at first glance. I’m going to list only those who’ve passed into the great beyond so as not to offend anyone still around who I might inadvertently forget to mention.

Each of the following had a “theirs alone” style unlike any other being published in the magazine. That’s a wonderful thing, and difficult to do in a crowded cartoonist universe; each brought something else to the drawing paper as well — sometimes easily defined (see Dean Vietor’s work, for example: I’ve mentioned his thrilling wild energetic drawings before on the Spill), and sometimes not.

So here, in alphabetical order are some (not all!) of those fun at first sight New Yorker artists …Addams, Arno (Peter & Ed), Charles Barsotti, Whitney Darrow, Chon Day, Alan Dunn, Dana Fradon, Helen Hokinson, Nurit Karlin, Anatol Kovarsky, Robert Kraus, Frank Modell, Mary Petty, Price (George & Garrett), Gardner Rea, Donald Reilly, Carl Rose, Al Ross, Charles Saxon, Bernie Schoenbaum, Barbara Shermund, Otto Soglow, Steig, Steinberg, James Stevenson, Richard Taylor, Thurber, Dean Vietor, Robert Weber, Gluyas Williams, Gahan Wilson, and Jack Ziegler.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Would love to report that Rea Irvin’s iconic design had returned (it’s been collecting dust since it was replaced by a redraw(!) in the Spring of 2017). But such is not the case. Bah, humbug.

Read about it here.

Here’s what we’re missing:

 

 

 

The Swann Cartoon Auction Is Back!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Swann Illustration Auction, postponed because of you-know-what, is now on for July 16th. The catalog isn’t online as of this morning, but you can see what’s up for grabs, including original work by some of the masters: Helen Hokinson, Charles Addams, William Steig, Barbara Shermund, Frank Modell (whose Don’t Trust Anyone Over 10 drawing appears here), Edward Sorel, Lee Lorenz, Charles Martin (C.E.M), Gahan Wilson, George Booth (see below), Richard Taylor, and more.  Go here to see for yourself.

(Work by New Yorker artists begins in earnest in the lot #200 range, but there are New Yorker artist pieces sprinkled elsewhere. For instance, if you go to lot #121 you’ll find a non-New Yorker piece by the great Rea Irvin).

Left: original George Booth cover art (published April 19, 1993) Lot #213

 

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for passing along word of the auction.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Farley Katz on going back out there.

Mr. Katz has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2007. Visit his website here.

A Mini Peter Arno Fest On Attempted Bloggery; More Good Reading From A New Yorker State Of Mind… The New Yorker May 9, 1931; Today’s Daily Cartoonist…A Newbie; More Spills: Kuper, Finck, Donnelly

A Mini Peter Arno Fest On Attempted Bloggery

Attempted Bloggery takes a look at Peter Arno’s 1929 best selling cartoon collection, Parade as it appeared in the U.K. and here at home….and further down the site, a look at the Arno covered game, Bonanza. Read here!

 

 

Bonus from the Arno research archives: Will Cuppy’s review of  The Second New Yorker Album and Arno’s Parade from The Chicago Daily Tribune, December 14, 1929.

I love “the boy’s alive right now and his drawings are among the most amusing things on earth…”

 

 

 

 

Peter Arno’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

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More Good Reading From A New Yorker State Of Mind: The New Yorker May 9, 1931.

An excellent blog to visit if you want to escape for awhile. Read here!

Cover by the one-and-only Helen Hokinson.

Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Helen Hokinson Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A newbie to the newyorker.com feature, Luke McGarry, who pops in on the Berenstain Bears.

Visit Mr. McGarry’s website here.

 

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…From Bleeding Cool News, May 29, 2020, “Peter Kuper Crosses Donald Trump With Winsor McCay”

Mr. Kuper’s website.

…From Financial Times, “Liana Finck, New Yorker Cartoonist, On Finding Confidence And Creativity  In Quarantine”

Ms. Finck’s website.

…Podcast of Interest: “How to Deal With Rejection” Liza Donnelly talks to Kelly Hoey.

Ms. Donnelly’s website.

The Wednesday Watch: Sam Gross Is On Facebook!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931; More Spills: Toro’s New Book; Latest Celeb Caption Contest Video

Sam Gross Is On Facebook!

The one, the only, the fabulous Sam Gross now has a Facebook page.

Mr. Gross’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Sam Gross Born 1933, Bronx, NY. New Yorker work: August 23, 1969 –. Other than his work in The New Yorker, Mr. Gross is probably best known for his work in National Lampoon. He’s edited a large number of collections, including Dogs Dogs Dogs, Cats Cats Cats, Food Food Food: A Feast of Great Cartoons (originally published as All You Can Eat: A Feast of Great Cartoons); Golf Golf Golf, Ho! Ho! Ho!, Movies Movies Movies. Key collections: I Am Blind and My Dog is Dead (Avon, 1978), An Elephant is Soft and Mushy (Avon, 1982)

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Lars Kenseth on being there, sort of.

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931

As usual with this Spill fave blog, it’s always a kick looking at what was happening in the New Yorkersphere way way way back when

Gotta love the Helen Hokinson cover.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

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...Tom Toro‘s first kids book is just out.  Read about it here.  Congrats,  Mr. T!

…the latest celeb New Yorker Caption Contest video has been posted. Several fun/funny captions  by Ellie Kemper & Daniel Radcliffe (the cartoons captioned are by David Borchart, Tom Cheney, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Maggie Larson, and Danny Shanahan).