The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker, October 14, 2019

The Cover: Ed Steed returns with his second New Yorker cover, and like his first (August 26th of this year) it’s a winner.  Read the magazine’s Q&A with Mr. Steed about his cover here.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

A number of drawings of special note in this issue:

A fab mouse drawing (it’s on page 30) by the great Sam Gross.  As noted here recently, Mr. Gross is now in his 50th year of contributing to The New Yorker.

Sara Lautman’s “…accompanied” drawing (p. 43) is a fine fun drawing — delivered in a style unlike any other in the magazine’s stable.

Lars Kenseth’s astronauts drawing (p. 58). I’ll just say it:  Mr. Kenseth’s drawing made me laugh out loud.

Sofia Warren’s Charles Addamsy drawing (p. 63).  A good deal of information to absorb, well-handled.

Glen Baxter’s lion in a museum (p. 48). I’m a sucker for (what seem like) bolt-of-lightning drawings. By that I mean drawings that seem instantaneously transferred to us from the artist without labor (Jack Ziegler was a master of the form). I could be completely wrong: perhaps Mr. Baxter spent hours and days developing this particular cartoon. It’s become a favorite Baxter drawing.

David Borchart’s drawing (p.44) is a fine addition to the magazine’s desert island canon. May desert island drawings never end.

From one who loves castles (and drawing them), nice to see Jeremy Nguyen’s different take (p.25).

A newbie in this issue: Yael Green makes her debut appearance (p.74). Ms. Green is the 23rd new cartoonist brought into the fold this year, and the 49th since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Here’s Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

The classic Talk masthead by Mr Irvin that ran for 92 consecutive years  is shown above. It was replaced by a redraw (!) in the Spring of 2017. It’s never too late to bring it back.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of September 9, 2019

The Cover:

It’s the Style Issue this week….thus the bountiful polka dots on Malika Favre’s eighth cover for the magazine. A Q&A with the artist here. If you link to the Q&A you’ll see the polka dot dress swirl.

I can’t see that many polka dots (and red) on the cover without thinking of Peter Arno’s March 23, 1935 New Yorker cover. It was also used as the cover for The Seventh New Yorker Album.

The dalmatians cover is perhaps overly familiar to me because it’s the front endpaper of my biography of Arno. Hey, what can I say? I like dogs…and Arno.

 

The Cartoonists and Cartoons

With the appearance of another team effort (third? fourth?) by Pia Guerra and Ian Boothby I think we’re in new territory as far as crediting a writing team goes for single panel cartoons in the magazine. Someone please correct me if there has been another duo credited beyond one or two appearances (Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb come to mind, but their work is in a different realm, i.e., their “thing” is not single panel cartoons). The duo of Guerra & Boothby have given us a slightly different take on the usual cartoonist’s representation of Noah’s Ark (the drawing appears on page 78). Instead of the long ramp leading up to the ark, it’s more of a tailgate.  It works well here.

Of note: Elisabeth McNair’s drawing of the tortoise and the hare (p. 72). If you remove the art hanging on the wall, and the door frame, the cartoon could easily be seen as descended from the school of (Charles) Barsotti minimalism. Love the turtle’s expression.

Also of note: Hilary Fitzgerald Cambell’s spooky “campfire” story-time drawing (p.49). At first glance I thought the scene was outdoors, but then saw the light sockets in the background with a charging electronic device (a phone?) connected to one of them. That it plays a trick on the eyes — intended or not — is pleasing, as is the drawing itself.

Further of note: Ed Steed adds another drawing to the cartoon canon of mounted something (in this case, someone) or others on the wall (p. 25).

Being the great grandson of bakers, and a fan of baked goods in general, it was a nice surprise  seeing pastries as a focus in Amy Hwang’s drawing (p. 43). Also a nice surprise: seeing Glen Baxter’s drawing (p.68). While a number of cartoonists box in their drawings, Baxter’s boxes somehow seem part of the drawing within, if that makes any sense (is the word “integral” — maybe, maybe not).

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead: Still not home. Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

Blitt and Kuper on Society of Illustrators Panel; Gil Roth Roth Interviews Glen Baxter; Another Look at Abner Dean; Felipe Galindo In Conference on Political Satire in Latin America; A Case For Pencils’ Pencils

 

 

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Last Minute Notice!

“Can Art Affect Social Change?”  Barry Blitt and Peter Kuper, among others, will discuss tonight at The Society of Illustrators.  Details here

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Check out Gil Roth’s wonderful interview with Glen Baxter on Mr. Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast here.

(Mr. Baxter talks about coming to The New Yorker in the Robert Gottlieb era).

While on the Virtual Memories site also be sure to take a look at past episodes, especially the long list of cartoonists (full disclosure, this cartoonist is among those listed).

 

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dean jacket.inddFrom New York Review Comics comes a new edition of Abner Dean’s What Am I Doing Here? originally published in 1947.  Read Mark Frauenfelder’s piece on it here on Boing Boing.

Here’s Mr. Dean’s entry on Ink Spill’s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Abner Dean Born, New York City, March 18, 1910. Died, June 30, 1982, NYC.  According to his New York Times obit (July 1, 1982) Dean “started his career at the National Academy of Design and went to Dartmouth College, where he graduated in 1931.”  He published numerous collections of his work, including It’s A Long Way to Heaven  (Farrar & Rinehart, 1945) and Wake Me When It’s Over (Simon & Schuster, 1955). Although primarily a cover artist for The New Yorker (he contributed five, all in the 1930s), he did publish one drawing in the magazine: January 2, 1960. 

 

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71440 Felipe Galindo  (aka Feggo) is participating in  Bitter Laughter: A Conference on Political Satire and Press Freedom in Latin America — a conference taking place in New York City this coming Saturday:  Details here.

 

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a-case-for-pencils-logoJane Mattimoe, who runs the wonderfully informative blog, A Case For Pencils, wherein New Yorker cartoonists share their tools of the trade, is sharing her own tools of the trade this week.  Check it out here.

Conversation of Interest: Emily Flake & Glen Baxter

glen-baxterCircle the date! Emily Flake in conversation with Glen Baxter on September 19th. Details here.  images-1

Ms. Flake’s cartoons were first published in The New Yorker in 2008,  Mr. Baxter’s in 1989. Mr. Baxter’s latest book, Almost Completely Baxter: New and Collected Blurtings, was published in May. Ms. Flake’s latest, Mama Tried, was published in the Fall of 2015.

 

 

 

 

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A Glen Baxter Sampler; Comics Academic Karen Green Interviewed

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The New York Review of Books takes a look at some of the work in Glen Baxter’s new book, Almost Completely Baxter: New and Selected Blurtings (published by New York Review Comics).

 

 

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2For anyone interested in the who what where why and when of the ever expanding graphic novel collection at Columbia University this interview’s for you.  Karen Green, a friend to all comic artists (and to Ink Spill), is the subject of a lengthy interview by Art Cloos on Scoop.