The Tilley Watch Online, Newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoons, February 4-8, 2019; Post-Auction Hokinsons On Attempted Bloggery; A Charles Saxon Shout-Out

This week’s Daily cartoons — close to 100% Trumpian — were contributed by Jason Adam Katzenstein, Michael Shaw, Peter Kuper, Barry Blitt, and Christopher Weyant.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Ed Steed, Tim Hamilton, Roz Chast, and Emily Flake.

See all of the above and more here on newyorker.com

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Post-Auction Hokinsons on Attempted Bloggery

Published January 1944 in The New Yorker

Attempted Bloggery has been taking a look at a small crop of Helen Hokinson drawings recently up-for-auction. You should take a look too!

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A Charles Saxon Shout-Out

A Charles Saxon cartoon anthology from 1977

It’s always a treat to see one cartoonist say nice things about another. Here’s Bill Abbott on Facebook talking about the late very great Charles Saxon.*

* Mr. Abbott suggests in his shout out that Saxon “never actually wrote any of his own material” — I believe he’s thinking of George Price, who is the only New Yorker cartoonist, other than Helen Hokinson, who relied solely on provided ideas.

And here’s Charles Saxon’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Saxon Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. NYer work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

Bonus! Here’s a link to a fun Saxon photo I’d not seen until this morning.


Thurber’s My Life And Hard Times: The Chinese Edition; More Price On Attempted Bloggery; Looking Closely At The New Yorker Issue Of January 4, 1930 On A New Yorker State Of Mind

Guess I’ll add this to my wish list: the Chinese edition of Thurber’s My Life and Hard Times, originally published by Harper & Brothers in 1933. The Chinese edition, published in December of 2018, uses Thurber’s drawing of Bolenciecwcz, the main character from chapter eight’s University Days (the drawing as it appears within the book is full page and carries the caption, Bolenciecwcz was trying to think).  The Chinese edition cover drawing has been altered with the addition of what looks to be a red flower.

You see on the cover a mention of the 1960 Tony Awards. The play, A Thurber Carnival won a special award that year. Thurber himself accepted. See it on Youtube, beginning at the 22:36 mark as Eddie Albert brings on Thurber’s dear friend, Elliot Nugent, to introduce Thurber.

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More Price On Attempted Bloggery

Attempted Bloggery celebrates its 2800th post with a look at a George Price drawing auctioned for a song. See it here.

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Looking Closely At The New Yorker Issue Of January 4, 1930

Another go-to site, A New Yorker State of Mind digs deep into the issue of January 4, 1930. The spectacular cover by the spectacular Rea Irvin. Read it all here.



Short Video Of Interest: Setting Up The Bruce Museum’s Masterpieces From The Museum Of Comic Art Exhibit; Attempted Bloggery Looks At George Price

Here’s a short (3 minute) video showing some decision-making for the Bruce Museum’s “Masterpieces From The Museum of Comic Art” exhibit. More info here.

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Attempted Bloggery Looks At George Price

Attempted Bloggery, a Spill go-to website has begun spotlighting some interesting George Price work, including the oddity above. See it all here.

George Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig). Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

Below: I’ve always loved the cover of Price’s 1963 collection, My Dear 500 Friends.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 17, 2018

The Cover:  You want Santa Claus on the cover of The New Yorker, you got him.  Here’s the cover artist, John Cuneo talking about his terrific cover as well as George Price (and others) as inspiration along the way.

The Cartoonists This Week:

The Cartoons & Illustrations: Twenty illustrations this week, with four-and-a-half of those full pages.  Twelve cartoons. 

Next Week: the last issue of 2018 — it’s a double issue.

Still Missing: Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead, replaced last year.  Read about it here.  My my my, what a thing of beauty:

 

 

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price; Liza Donnelly In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price

Stephen Nadler’s latest Attempted Bloggery post shows us some wonderful work by three New Yorker cartoon gods: Charles Addams, William Steig and George Price. See all the ads here.

The artists entries on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig. Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

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Liza Donnelly To Speak In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Ms. Donnelly, who’s work has appeared in The New Yorker since 1982, will speak this week at Toonfest in Marceline, Missouri, Walt Disney’s hometown.