Article Of Interest: George Booth; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Sipress; Interview Of Interest: Jason Chatfield

Article Of Interest: George Booth

From Bklyner, April 30, 2019: “Cartoonist George Booth: A Real New Yorker”

— a nice piece about Mr. Booth, one of the giants in the universe of New Yorker  artists. He’s soon to celebrate his 93rd birthday as well as his 50th year with the magazine. See more of his work here.

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Today’ Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, handled by David Sipress, concerns the rippling pond of Democratic candidates for President. Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.  See more of his work here.

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Interview Of Interest: Jason Chatfield

 

From Ladders, April 30, 2019, “This hilarious New Yorker cartoonist has the best advice for how to use self-doubt to your advantage” — this brief interview with Jason Chatfield who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017. Visit his website here.

The Tilley Watch Online, April 8 -12, 2019; Blog Posts Of Interest: Attempted Bloggery & A New Yorker State Of Mind

An end of the week reminder of which New Yorker cartoonist was where on newyorker.com

The Daily Cartoon: New Yorker cartoonists contributing this week were Lila Ash (two appearances), Colin Tom, Ivan Ehlers, and Brendan Loper.

Daily Shouts: New Yorker cartoonists contributing this week were J.A.K. (with Julia Rothman), Sarah Ransohoff (with Johnny DiNapoli).  Also contributing was the New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes. 

See all of the above, and more here.

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Blogs Of Interest

….Attempted Bloggery looks at a George Booth original drawing recently auctioned for a song.

…and don’t forget the George Booth (documentary film project) Kickstarter campaign underway. Six days to go!

 

A New Yorker State of Mind continues its bang-up job of chronologically deep-diving into every single issue of the magazine. Two issues this week!

(both covers shown by Rea Irvin)

Case for Pencils Spotlights George Booth Documentary Filmmakers; More On Thurber’s Mile And A Half Of Lines; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Colin Tom

Check out Jane Mattimoe’s latest Case For Pencils. She interviews the filmmakers now working on Drawing Life, the “partly animated film” about George Booth.

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More on…A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber 

A review copy — in pdf — of the upcoming Thurber title shown above has reached the Spill‘s headquarters. Michael Rosen, who put it all together (i.e., edited it) has done a grand slam job. Thurberites and fans of New Yorker cartoon art will be thrilled by the large number of previously unpublished drawings, and accompanying text. More details will follow as allowed.

A Mile an a Half of Lines will be out July 12th.  The Ohio State University Press is the publisher.

[full disclosure: My wife, Liza Donnelly, and I are contributors to the book].

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Colin Tom began contributing in 2015.  Visit his website here.

The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue Of April 1, 2019; MoCCA Fest Event Of Note: Mort Gerberg And Friends (Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, Bob Eckstein, And Michael Maslin); Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Christopher Weyant; Today’s Bonus Daily Cartoonist: Barry Blitt

The Cover: it’s a treat to have Bruce McCall’s work back on the cover. You can read about it here (and see an early version of the cover).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

And speaking of treats, here are some of this issue’s cartoons that especially caught my eye:

Chris Weyant’s plumbing drawing (p.52). It reminded me, in the best possible way, of Jack Ziegler’s classic 1980 drawing Plumbing Trouble of the Gods. Mr. Weyant has delivered a funny, perfectly handled drawing. 

And then there’s David Borchart’s terrific giraffe drawing (p. 66). Perhaps this is the start of something big? Giraffes have never been anywhere as popular as cats and dogs in the cartoon universe (Lars Kenseth has drawn a very funny pug(?) in his all-dog cartoon on page 35). 

Finally, what a blast to come upon George Booth’s drawing in this issue (it’s on page 59). It’s a sunny day when Mr. Booth’s work appears (it’s worth mentioning again here on the Spill that Mr. Booth is the subject of an in-progress documentary film).

Applause for all.

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There are several drawings in the issue that, for some, might require Googling. I’ve always been a believer in “getting” a drawing without assistance. If I don’t get it, I move on (or occasionally ask a friend for help).  Of course, not getting certain New Yorker cartoons is age-old.

A note: this week’s Talk section includes a Sketchpad (it features a color “illustration” by Emily Flake).  A usage reminiscent of the comic strips briefly brought in during the early 1990s under Tina Brown. The Brown era comic strips ran across the entire width of each page (i.e., 6 columns wide), whereas this Sketchpad is 4 columns wide. Below: an example of a strip from the past: a Victoria Roberts piece from the issue of March 28, 1994.

Finally, the beautiful Rea Irvin masthead continues to remain in storage — not even brought out  as some kind of tease for this April 1st issue.  Well, here it is below, as it will be weekly until it reappears in the magazine (I can dream, can’t I?). 

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MoCCA Fest Event Of Note: Mort Gerberg and Friends: Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein. Panel moderated by Michael Maslin

The upcoming Museum of Comic and Cartoon Art (otherwise known as MoCCA) will begin its 2019 Festival on April 6th. A number of New Yorker folks will be participating (and I will note them as the information becomes available). Here’s the announcement of one that just came into the Spill:

 

Mort Gerberg and Friends

 

Mort Gerberg broke into print with irreverent drawings in The Realist in the early ’60s. His social-justice-minded—and bitingly funny—cartoons subsequently appeared in magazines including The New Yorker, Playboy, and the Saturday Evening Post. As a reporter, he’s sketched historic scenes including the women’s marches of the ’60s and the 1968 Democratic National Convention.

He is currently the subject of a retrospective exhibit at the New-York Historical Society, and Fantagraphics Underground Press has recently published the retrospective book Mort Gerberg On the Scene: A 50-Year Cartoon Chronicle. Gerberg will discuss his work in a conversation with friends and colleagues, led by Michael Maslin (Inkspill, The New Yorker) and including New Yorker cartoonists Marisa Acocella, Bob Eckstein and Danny Shanahan.

Garamond Room / 3:00 pm, Saturday, April 6th

Link to MoCCA’s website here for more general info.

Photos above, l-r: Danny Shanahan, Marisa Acocella, and Bob Eckstein

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist & Bonus Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Christopher Weyant is today’s Daily Cartoonist.  You can see his (Trump) drawing here. 

Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Link to his website here.

And here’s Barry Blitt’s Bonus Daily cartoon  —  Trump-world-ish .

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994.  Link to his website here.

 

 

 

A George Booth Film!; A Q&A Of Interest: Ellis Rosen; The Traveling Cartoon Museum; Liza Donnelly To Judge Cartoons In Cuba; More From The Dick Buchanan Files Via Mike Lynch; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper

A George Booth Film!

Happy to report that a George Booth film is in the works. Mr. Booth is, of course, one of the gods of The New Yorker‘s cartoon world.  This year marks his 50th year at the magazine.  Read about the film and George Booth, and see a Kickstarter teaser clip here.

Here’s Mr. Booth’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

George Booth (photo above taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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A Q&A Of Interest: Ellis Rosen

From Unsettled, “Q&A With Ellis Rosen, Cartoonist And illustrator For The New Yorker” 

Mr. Ellis began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  Visit his website here.

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The Traveling Cartoon Museum

The Museum of Cartoon Art first caught my attention in September of 1980 when the article above appeared in The New York Times. Since then the museum has moved about a good deal (for a museum). This is a good catching up article about its travels: “The Rocky History of Connecticut’s Cartoon Museum” — from the CTPost, March 21, 2019.

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Liza Donnelly To Judge Cartoons In Cuba

Liza Donnelly, that globe-trotting New Yorker cartoonist (she was live-drawing on China’s Great Wall not long ago; she’s shown above live-drawing at a conference in Brussels last week) is off to Cuba in a few days to join in the judging of cartoons for the 21st Bienal International De Humorismo Grafico.  Info here.

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More From The Dick Buchanan Files Via Mike Lynch

Dick Buchanan continues to share his incredible cartoon tear sheet collection via Mike Lynch’s blog. Without Mr. Buchanan (and Mr. Lynch), such great work as Gahan Wilson’s cartoon from Collier’s (shown above) might be lost to the ages.

This is how Mike introduced the latest Buchanan Files:

Thank you, you lovely, crazy Dick Buchanan, for diving into your files in your Greenwich Village apartment so many times and coming up with these pretty-much-unseen-since-publication single panel cartoons. These are, as you will see, crazy good.

See all the work here.

And speaking of Gahan Wilson, the GOFundMe campaign for him is still underway.  Go here to read more, and contribute.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, Trump not letting go, not letting up, is by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011. Link to his website here.