Late Notice: A Launch Party Tonight With Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell Live-Drawing; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 18, 2019; Some Thoughts After Seeing The Documentary Film, “Stevenson Lost And Found”

Late Notice: A Launch Party Tonight With Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell Live-Drawing

From the Facebook Invite:

Come celebrate the release of Sarah Dooley’s new book ‘Are You My Uber?’ which is a parody of the P.D. Eastman classic ‘Are You My Mother?’ Listen to comedians Sydnee Washington, Eva Victor, Larry Owens, Pat Regan, Marcia Belsky, Gabe Gonzalez, and Taylor Ortega tell hilarious stories of wild cab experiences while Hilary Campbell, the book’s illustrator, does live drawings.

Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017. Visit her website here.

______________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A leafy Daily from Chris Weyant, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Visit his website here.

 

______________________________________________________________________________

The Cover: I see leaves. The fifth cover (below right) by Brigit Schossow.  Read a Q&A with her here.

There’ve been a lot, a whole lot, of leafy New Yorker covers, but this current one by Ms. Schossow  brought to mind (courtesy of a helpful New Yorker colleague) the beauty below left by the magazine’s former art & cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A scattering of thoughts about just a few of the cartoons in this issue:

P.C. Vey’s bear and couple in the woods (on page 33) made my day.

Something totally unexpected cartoon-wise is usually always good, and so it was coming upon a Jack Ziegler cartoon. Especially nice that the drawing is set in one of his favorite cartoon scenarios: a bar.

A fun Pete Mueller drawing (p.27).  Two Mueller drawings in two issues. Yay!

Ellis Rosen’s friend’s shower (p.56) is different. Like the choices of warm/cold and cold/warm.

Needed a ten second Googled refresher course with Liana Finck’s drawing (p. 60).  Not so much what her drawing means, but the meme’s origin (just curious, y’know).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Am hoping to open the issue one day and see Mr. Irvin’s iconic design has returned. No dice this week. For now, there’s that re-draw. Read about the classic Irvin Talk masthead here.

Here’s the real deal:

___________________________________________________________________________

Some Thoughts After Seeing The James Stevenson Documentary Film, Stevenson Lost And Found

A few random thoughts after attending last night’s premiere of Sally Williams’ fab documentary film, Stevenson Lost And Found.  There are are so many moments in the film — too many to go into here — that cartoonists and people who love New Yorker cartoons will treasure.

One instance I found particularly fascinating: the animated sequence showing what might go through cartoonists brains as they sit down and begin the day’s work. We’re shown a series of cartoons covering a wide variety of subject matter. It is, for this cartoonist, a relatable experience, as the mind careens through unlimited places every morning.

Another instance: in some eye-popping sequences we’re shown images of Mr. Stevenson’s children’s books lined-up, as well as Mr. Stevenson’s New Yorker  black scrap books (shown above) kept in the magazine’s library. These books contain every single signed New Yorker contribution by Stevenson, whether it’s his writing or drawing (including covers of course).*  Most of The New Yorker’s nearly 650 cartoonists (from 1925- present) have not had their work collected in one scrap book, let alone five. **

At the screening, I was lucky enough to be seated next to the legendary artist, Edward Sorel. During one of the sequences in the film where we are grasping the enormous amount of work Stevenson did (both published and unpublished) Mr. Sorel leaned over and said to me, “Do you feel as much like an underachiever as I do?”

In a perfect cartoon world, there’d be films such as Lost And Found for a number of the magazine’s artists. It’s heartening that there is already a Thurber film out there, and an Addams documentary in the works, as well as a film about George Booth.  But how about a Steinberg documentary, and one about Steig***?  I can dream, can’t I.  For now, we are quite fortunate to have this gem on Stevenson showing on the big screen. Go see.

__________________________________

* I say “signed” because The New Yorker  did not and does not scrap book cartoon ideas handled by other artists. Mr. Stevenson, early in his New Yorker career, wrote a large number of captions for some of the magazine’s artists (read about his “secret job” here).

**Artists (and writers) without an enormous amount of work are scrap booked in alphabetically  cataloged books, along with other contributors.

***A short video accompanied the Steig exhibit that ran at The Norman Rockwell exhibit.

There is a 20 minute film about Edward Sorel available here.

A 40 minute Eldon Dedini film here, 

And a short film about C.E.M. (Charles E. Martin) here.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 11, 2019

The Cover: Bruce McCall returns with a cut-away cover. I can’t think of a New Yorker cut-away drawing without thinking of this Charles Addams classic from April 28, 1951 (found on the left, mid-way down the link page). 

The Cartoonists:

Some random thoughts on some of the cartoons in this week’s issue:

…as a P.S. Mueller fan, and as someone who loves cowboy drawings, it was a blast coming upon his drawing on page 75….

…there are two cartoons in the issue as a result of team work: one by Kamraan Haffeez and Al Batt, the other by Corey Pandolf and Craig Baldo…

… work appears by two of the three New Yorker cartoonists who’ve been published in The New Yorker longer than any of the other active contributors*: Edward Koren and George Booth. Edward Koren’s first New Yorker cartoon was published May 26, 1962. Mr. Booth’s first New Yorker drawing was published in the issue of June 14, 1969. *Mort Gerberg is second — his first drawing appeared in April of 1965. It should be noted that Sam Gross is hot on Mr. Booth’s heels — his first New Yorker drawing appeared August 23, 1969, two months after Mr. Booth’s first.

…the way Karen Sneider drew the two characters in her fun cartoon (p.80) vaguely reminds me of Chon Day’s work. Mr. Day’s style seemed to me a way more organized and orderly version of Thurber’s. Mr. Day did wonders with a simple line, and an occasional layer of faint wash.

…really like the pay-off of Amy Hwang’s caption in her drawing (on page 61).

…congrats to all the runners in yesterday’s NYC Marathon, including our very own Liza Donnelly    who ran the big race for the very first time (her “Was Married” drawing appears on page 78).

The Rea Irvin Missing (and Missed) Talk Masthead Watch

The above jewel has been missing from The New Yorker since the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of October 21, 2019; Head-Scratching Quote Of The Year; Addams’s Wednesday

The Cover: a somewhat menacing image by Mark Ulriksen that could’ve easily been used for Halloween (all it needs is a witch riding through the sky on a broom). But its title “Towering Wealth” heavily suggests a tie-in to this special Money Issue. Read a Q&A with Mr. Ulriksen about his cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Random thoughts after a few tours through the the issue…

Was much fun immediately running into Robert Leighton’s observatory cartoon (page 25). We don’t see too many observatory cartoons anymore.  One that will forever stick in my mind is John O’Brien’s fabulous Coca-Cola bottle telescope from October 9, 2000.

Any issue of The New Yorker with a George Booth cartoon (p.38) is an issue off to an excellent start. It is simply a delight seeing his work in the magazine.

As enjoyable as seeing a Booth cartoon is seeing a Koren cartoon. He is this issue’s most veteran artist, having begun contributing to The New Yorker in 1962 (Mr. Booth began contributing in 1969).  To my eye, Both Mr. Booth’s drawing and Mr. Koren’s sit perfectly on the page, the better for us to enjoy them.

Bruce Kaplan’s dishtowel drawing (p.55) wins the award for most unexpected cartoon of the issue. There is nothing more fun in The New Yorker cartoon universe than the unexpected; it’s a cartoon moment.

Liana Finck’s drawing (p.46) is another solid cartoon moment.  Drawing + perfect caption = job well done.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Mr. Irvin’s wonderful design (below) was removed in the Spring of 2017 and replaced by a redrawn version. Further reading here. It remains puzzling (to me anyway) how something so perfect can be mothballed.

______________________________________________________________

Head-Scratching Quote Of The Year

This from Francoise Mouly, The New Yorker’s art editor in an October 11th Washington Post piece on Charles Addams.

“Addams is one of the few New Yorker cartoonists who was consistently laugh-out funny,” says Francoise Mouly, the magazine’s art editor since 1993.”

 

_____________________________________________

Addams’s Wednesday

From The New York Times, October 14, 2019, “The Many Shades Of Wednesday Addams”

Miss Addams is shown above sitting on her father’s shoulder. According to Linda Davis’s wonderful biography of Charles Addams, Addams wrote in his production notes for the television series that “he found [Wednesday] ‘secretive and imaginative, and  poetic.'”

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 23, 2019

The Cover: How great it is to see a J.J. Sempe cover.  A very short Q&A with Mr. Sempe here.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Some random thoughts:  Enjoyed Amy Hwang’s guillotine/watermelon drawing (p. 30) — guillotine drawings are rare but usually memorable (Tom Cheney’s from February 24, 1997 for instance, or this one from George Booth, also published in 1997, in the June 9th issue).  Ms. Hwang’s hooded henchman is not alone in the issue.  Another appears in Emily Flake’s court jester drawing (p.39).  It’s sort of a first cousin to another Cheney guillotine drawing published November 1, 2010.

Much enjoyed Robert Leighton’s frogs drawing (p.63). I just had to look up previous lily pad frog drawings and came across this beauty from the great Warren Miller published March 5, 1990 (one of several frog on lily pad drawings referencing Monet).

There’s a lot going on graphically in Bruce Eric Kaplan’s very funny drawing (p.45) but a wee meatball is the star.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic heading shown below is still a-missin. Read about it here.

 

The Weekend Spill: A Booth Exhibit; New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry; Events Of Interest With Liana Finck; The Tilley Watch Online For August 19-23, 2019

A Booth Exhibit

There’s a brand new George Booth exhibit up and running at Gallery North out on Long Island. All the info here.

George Booth’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth (photo taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

___________________________________________________________________________________

New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry

Trump + Golf + Greenland,  courtesy of Mr. Blitt.

See it here.

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

_______________________________________________________________

Events of Interest With Liana Finck

Tis nearing the season for promotional events tied-in to Liana Finck’s upcoming collection, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self, due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks. Brooklyn’s Books Are Magic will host an event on October 3rd (scroll down to October 3rd), and The Commonwealth Club (out in San Fran) will hold an event on October 14th.

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

_________________________________________________________________________________

A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts during the past week (August 19 -23)

The Daily Cartoon:

Farley Katz, Tim Hamilton (twice), Jeremy Nguyen, and Mark Thompson.

Daily Shouts: “Achievable Ways To Feel Accomplished” by Julia Edelman and Ginny Hogan. Illustrated by Will McPhail; “Larson’s Guide To Odd Birds Of New York City” by Maggie Larson.

All these and more can be found here.