Happy 94th George Booth!

One of our most beloved New Yorker cartoonists (and our senior member) turns 94 today. The Spill wishes George Booth a most happy happy day!

Here’s a nice Booth piece broadcast on CBS Sunday Morning back in 2017.

And, here’s his entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for the reminder (via social media) of Mr. Booth’s anniversary

The Swann Cartoon Auction Is Back!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Swann Illustration Auction, postponed because of you-know-what, is now on for July 16th. The catalog isn’t online as of this morning, but you can see what’s up for grabs, including original work by some of the masters: Helen Hokinson, Charles Addams, William Steig, Barbara Shermund, Frank Modell (whose Don’t Trust Anyone Over 10 drawing appears here), Edward Sorel, Lee Lorenz, Charles Martin (C.E.M), Gahan Wilson, George Booth (see below), Richard Taylor, and more.  Go here to see for yourself.

(Work by New Yorker artists begins in earnest in the lot #200 range, but there are New Yorker artist pieces sprinkled elsewhere. For instance, if you go to lot #121 you’ll find a non-New Yorker piece by the great Rea Irvin).

Left: original George Booth cover art (published April 19, 1993) Lot #213

 

— My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for passing along word of the auction.

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Farley Katz on going back out there.

Mr. Katz has been contributing to The New Yorker since

2007. Visit his website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 18, 2020

The Cover: a sign o’ the times graduation piece by Anita Kunz. This is the tenth out the last eleven covers that is coronavirus-related.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An even dozen cartoons & cartoonists, with a thirteenth, Ed Steed, as this week’s Spot drawing artist. The newbie in the crowd, Oren Bernstein, is the sixth new New Yorker cartoonist of 2020, and the fifty-ninth new addition to the stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Some fleeting thoughts on a few of this week’s drawings:

…The aforementioned newbie’s drawing style looks to be in the school of John O’Brien (although this drawing carries a caption; Mr. O’Brien is one of the masters of the captionless cartoon).

…I was hoping to see a horse in Roz Chast’s ranch drawing, but alas! (I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s horse drawings).

…two drawings, two very different styles, caught my eye: Mitra Farmand’s cats in bags (p.62)… and Liana Finck’s moonbeam in a jar (p. 40).

…Emily Bernstein’s racoon drawing caption is swell & funny.

…the rhythm of the wording in the boxed title of Maddie Dai’s gameboard drawing (p.37) vaguely echoed (for me) the wording in John Held, Jr.’s New Yorker work (with maybe a dash of Glen Baxter tossed in).

…I like seeing the George Boothian rug in Frank Cotham’s cartoon (p. 44). When I began studying Mr. Booth’s work, I noticed how many of his carpets never quite sat completely flat on the floor. I found this touch of reality (just one of many in Mr. Booth’s work) inspirational. Example (in this May 25, 1998 New Yorker drawing):

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

The above iconic design by the great Rea Irvin was ditched in the Spring of 2017 in favor a redrawn(!) version. Hopefully, one day, someday, the above will return. Read all about it here.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 11, 2020: Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

The Cover: The ninth coronavirus-themed cover out of the last ten issues. Here’s a Q&A with cover artist, Christoph Mueller.

From the Dept. of Broken Records: sorry, but do New Yorker covers really need titles? This one would be fine standing all by itself.

The Cartoonists:

Let Us Now Praise George Booth’s Auto Repair Shop Cartoons

In a departure for the Monday Tilley Watch, I’m going to talk about just one of this week’s cartoonists, and his garage-centric drawings. When one thinks of New Yorker car drawings, there are at least two possible candidates that come readily to mind: the late great Joe Mirachi* and the singularly sensational soon-to-be-94 year old George Booth.  As you see in the above list of this week’s contributing cartoonists, Mr. Booth leads off the issue. What a kick to see this cartoon! What fun! The drawing is of a garage mechanic telling a customer, “We found a dangling participle in your carburetor, Professor.”  In Mr. Booth’s fifty-one year history of contributing to The New Yorker, his garage mechanic drawings rank up there with, among others, his guy in the claw-foot bathtub, his cave people and, of course, his dog and cat drawings.

When I think about New Yorker artists who have been with the magazine for some time — Mr. Booth’s first appeared in 1969 — I’m always curious to see when it was that one of their special interests began. With Booth, it didn’t take long at all for his first car mechanic cartoon to appear.  Below is his third New Yorker drawing (it appeared in the issue of March 7, 1970).

I don’t have access to an up-to-the minute accounting of Booth’s New Yorker work, so I’m unable to give an accounting of how many garage mechanic drawings the magazine’s published (if you type in “car” on the magazine’s database in association with George Booth’s name, 65 results are returned. But the database is good only up to February 14, 2005). Here are just a few of Booth’s classic additions to The New Yorker‘s cartoon car canon, beginning with a favorite from January 13, 1973.

 

And from March 25, 1974:

Finally, this beauty from May 27, 1991:

It’s tempting to remark on the detail you see in all of Booth’s repair shop drawings, but heck, detail has been Booth’s middle name throughout his more than eight hundred-and-fifty cartoons published thus far. His love of the scene found inside (and outside) the garage is obvious — all those golden graphic opportunities. We are fortunate Booth finds the elements in and around the shop worthy of pen and ink examination: the mechanics themselves in their well-worn grease-splotched coveralls, and then of course, the puzzled customers and their cars (what great cars!) and the ever-present Booth cats (and/or dogs).

I’ve spent a lot of time waiting in auto repair shops; it’s always a bit of a Boothian experience, looking around, noting the “stuff” — seeing it as Booth sees it. I owe George Booth plenty for his love of capturing the car shop — it clearly inspired my repair shop drawings, and “inspired” is putting it mildly as is clear in the below drawing of mine from The New Yorker issue of December 24, 1984.

Hats and caps off to Booth!

 

* Below: a Joe Mirachi New Yorker car cartoon, published November 24, 1986

 

 

 

 

 

The Latest American Bystander; Jason Chatfield’s Covid-19 Diary; Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts Cartoonists (Yesterday’s & Today’s)…And Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

The latest American Bystander (March 2020) has landed on my desk —  it’s a treat!  Here are The New Yorker cartoonists whose contributions you’ll find in the issue (and in the case of John Cuneo, on the issue’s cover):

George Booth (besides a full-page Booth drawing there’s a lovely photo of Mr. Booth on the very last page), Roz Chast (a two-page spread of her cartoons), Sam Gross (in “Sam’s Spot”, a regular Bystander feature), Peter Kuper, David Ostow, Ali Solomon, Rich Sparks, Cerise Zelenetz, and P.S. Mueller.

A bonus in every issue — I see it as a bonus anyway — are the numerous full page ads for books by cartoonists (no surprise, I’m particularly fond of the books by New Yorker contributors). In this issue we see an ad for Rich Spark’s cartoon collection, Love And Other Weird Things, Ben Katchor’s The Dairy Restaurant, Robert Grossman’s Life On The Moon, Roz Chast’s & Patty Marx’s You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time, Peter Kuper’s adaptation of Joseph Conrad’s Heart Of Darkness, and John Donohue’s All The Restaurants In New York.

Go here to the Bystander‘s website to order a copy and/or subscribe.

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Jason Chatfield’s Covid-19 Diary

The New Yorker cartoonist Jason Chatfield draws and writes about his recent experience with the “invisible enemy.”  So very glad to hear he and his wife have fully recovered. 

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Daily Cartoonists & Daily Shouts Cartoonists (Yesterday’s & Today’s)…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

Today’s Daily cartoonist & cartoon: J.A.K. on who’s speaking. Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.

Two Daily Shouts Cartoonists Today:

  1. Ali Fitzgerald: “America!: Dr. Fauci Reads A Bedtime Story To Anxious Adults”

2. Emily Flake: “Homeschool Spirit Week!”

Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist:  Emily Flake, who began contributing in 2008. Audio Flake: this from Gil Roth’s Virtual Memories podcast.

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts cartoonist: Zoe Si’s “Substitutions In The Time Of Quarantine, Rated”

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Our President Concocts A Cure For The Coronavirus”