Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Strand Event Of Interest; A Daily Shouts With Emily Flake; Ryan Flanders’ TCJ Friday Links; Anthologies For The Waning Dog Days Of Summer

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Kuper gives us three reasons Trump wants to buy Greenland.

Mr. Kuper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2011.

Visit his website here.

_____________________________________________

Strand Event Of Interest

On September 16th the Strand will host a panel discussion centered on Drawing Power: Women’s Stories of Sexual Violence, Harassment, and Survival.  All the info here.

Drawing Power contributors include New Yorker artists Aline Kominsky-Crumb and Liana Finck.

_______________________________________

A Daily Shouts With Emily Flake

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts by David Bradley Isenberg and Emily Flake: “Possible Explanations For Why Your Subway Car Is Empty”

Ms. Flake has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2008.  Visit her website here.

______________________________

Ryan Flander’s TCJ Friday Links

Mr. Flanders’ Friday gathering of comics (and comix) related links. Included here on the Spill as it offers a ton of non-Tilley avenues to explore, if that’s your thing. There’s one New Yorker mention this week (the magazine’s Peanuts article, “How ‘Peanuts’ Created A Space For Thinking”). 

________________________________

Anthologies For The Waning Dog Days Of Summer

Some wonderful dog-centric books selected from the Spill‘s library.

Thurber’s Dogs (Simon & Schuster, 1955)

The New Yorker Book of Dog Cartoons (Knopf, 1992)

The Big Book New Yorker Book of Dogs (Random House, 2012)

Dogs by Henry Morgan & George Booth (Houghton Mifflin, 1976)

Dogs Dogs Dogs edited by Sam Gross (Harpercollins, 1985).

 

Fave Photo Of The Day: George Booth, Mort Gerberg, And Sam Gross; A Chitty Shouts; Article Of Interest: Working At Mad Past Its Heyday; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Two Collaborative Daily Shouts

Fave Photo Of The Day

Via Sarah Booth’s Instagram account, three long-time New Yorker cartoonists in front of a tattoo parlor,  July 2019.

Left to right: George Booth, Mort Gerberg, and Sam Gross.  Mr. Booth and Mr. Gross began contributing to The New Yorker in 1969, and Mr. Gerberg in 1965.

And…another group photo appears on the drawinglifemovie Instagram account (it’s attached to the George Booth Drawing Life documentary film in progress) .

— My thanks to Attempted Bloggery‘s Stephen Nadler for bringing the photos to my attention.

__________________________________

A Chitty Shouts

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts from Tom Chitty: “Some Questions You May Be Asked When Applying For Ginger Citizenship”

— Mr. Chitty began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit his website here.

 

____________________________________

Working At MAD Past Its Heyday

From The Comics Journal, July 17, 2019, this excellent piece by Ryan Flanders, “An Unusual Gang Of Idiots: The Joy Of Working At MAD Past Its Heyday”

 

 

 

________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Today’s Daily, courtesy of Ellis Rosen: Technology Meets Wilde.

Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  Visit his website here.

______________________________

 

Two Collaborative Daily Shouts

Olivia de Recat (contributing to The New Yorker since 2017) teamed up with Sarah Vollman for “Gifts To Commemorate Lesser-Know Milestones”

Visit Olivia de Recat’s website here. 

And also today, this duo Daily Shouts by Colin Stokes and Ellis Rosen, “Facial Expressions For Reacting To The New York Times Crossword” 

Mr Stokes is The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor.  He has also contributed written pieces to the magazine.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue, July 8 & 15, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

The Cover: A hot dog cart guy gets some beach time on Peter De Seve’s cover.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbies: Making their New Yorker print debut this week: Victor Varnado and Akeem Roberts. They become the record-setting nineteenth and twentieth new cartoonists entering the magazine’s stable of artists this year and the forty-fifth and forty-sixth new artists brought in under cartoon editor Emma Allen’s stewardship, begun in May of 2017.

The Cartoons: Brief thoughts on some of the thirteen cartoons in the issue:

Roz Chast’s Ordinary Kreskin drawing (p. 37).  Love Ms. Chast’s right-to-the-point drawings, like this one. Perhaps not so unusual, but noticeable: she’s drawn Mr. Kreskin with five fingers (a lot of cartoonists find four will do for their cartoon characters). 

Liana Finck’s talking baby (p. 44).  A terrific twist on an end-of-life sentiment. I found myself wondering if it would’ve been equally successful had the baby been talking to another baby.

Ed Steed’s hammered drawing (p.54).  At first glance on my laptop, before zooming in on the drawing I thought that Mr. Steed had done a mash-up drawing with George Booth. If you squint your eyes, it’s a very Boothian room (the perspective, the hanging ceiling lamp, the floorboards, wall objects). 100% Steedian is the idea itself and the Steedian happily hammering woman.

My confused initial take on seeing the drawing leads me to toss out a suggestion. There’s been plenty written on this site about cartoon collaboration, but those duets have involved a writer teamed with an artist (or two artists collaborating) with just one person doing the drawing.  Howz about for fun we see some artists team-up and create a drawing or two with multiple styles in one frame. Some suggestions: Chast/Finck, Dator/Donnelly,  Hwang/Shanahan, Sipress/Allenby,  Kenseth/Koren…just a thought. (Liza Donnelly and I had a ton ‘o’ fun doing a series of mash-up full-page graphic pieces for our 2009 collection, Cartoon Marriage)  

Paul Noth’s line of succession drawing (p. 58). Mr. Noth delivers a great drawing.  I only wish it had been given more breathing room (such as Mr. Steed’s). 

Robert Leighton’s drawing (p.32) features a caption that would probably be right at home in a positive thinking seminar.  Yet another Leighton drawing destined for many a refrigerator.   

Karen Sneider’s funny fish in bed recalls the classic George Price drawing published in the magazine’s issue of December 21, 1963

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin (with Harold Ross and his then-wife, Jane Grant) was a founder of The New Yorker‘s graphic architecture. Consider his adapted typeface (the so-called Irvin typeface) that is part of the magazine’s DNA, the breadth of cartoon worlds he encouraged as art supervisor, his department heading designs, and his numerous covers (including, of course, the magazine’s brilliant first that gave us Eustace Tilley). Tis a puzzlement that his iconic heading for the Talk Of The Town remains under a tarp. Here it is below, and here’s where you can read about its removal in 2017.

 

____________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist’s Cartoon

Singin’ under the drip from Amy Kurzweil, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

Happy 93rd, George Booth!; Articles Of Interest: Maira Kalman, Ken Krimstein; Ali Fitzgerald’s Daily Shouts; The Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons: Lila Ash, Liz Montague

Happy 93rd George Booth!

Here’s to one of The New Yorker‘s greatest artists, George Booth, born 93 years ago today in Cainsville, Missouri.

Above: Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead & Co., 1976)

Mr. Booth at the Society of Illustrators, November 2017 for the opening of George Booth — A Cartoonist’s Life

East Side Main St., Cainsville, Mo.

The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz (Workman, 1998)

Mr. Booth kicking up his heels with Drawing Life  filmmaker, Nathan Fitch and animation artist, Emily Collins

_____________________________

Article Of Interest: Maira Kalman

From From The Grapevine, June 28, 2019, “Maira Kalman Is More Than Just A Quirky Cartoonist For The New Yorker”*

Ms. Kalman has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1995. Visit her website here.

*maybe too inside baseball here, but a more accurate headline may have been, “Ms. Kalman is More Than Just A Quirky Cover Artist For The New Yorker”

_____________________

Article Of Interest: Ken Krimstein

From DePaul Magazine, (Summer Issue), “New Yorker Cartoonist Waxes Philosophic”  — the spotlight here is on Ken Krimstein, who began contributing his work to The New Yorker in 2000. He is the author of the two books shown above. Visit his website here.

_______________________

Ali Fitzgerald’s Daily Shouts

“America! 2020 Democratic Candidates As Nineteen-Nineties Boy-Band Members” by Ali Fitzgerald

(posted June 27th, 2019)

 

_____________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons

Lila Ash, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018, on the next Dem debate.

And a Bonus Daily from Liz Montague who began contributing to The New Yorker this past March.

 

 

Two Peacocks Walk Into A Room; Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Cartoon Anthology: Sara Lautman’s Daily Shouts; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Avi Steinberg

In one of those million-to-one cartoon moments, both my colleague Harry Bliss (with his collaborator Steve Martin) and I have similar drawings out this week (his in his syndicated daily spot, and mine in The New Yorker). What’s unusual, besides the timing of publication, and the peacock standing in a doorway in both drawings, is the use of the peacock itself. A quick visit to the New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site turned up peacock drawings by a dozen artists. I have to think there were a number more in the magazine’s ninety-four years (the Cartoon Bank site does not provide every cartoon in the magazine’s archive). The listed peacock drawings are by: Mick Stevens, Sam Gross, Will McPhail, John O’Brien, George Booth, Bernard Schoenbaum, George Price, Edward Koren, Saul Steinberg (he has three), Robert Day, Mort Gerberg, and Victoria Roberts. There were also three peacock covers shown. The artists:  Joseph Low (the peacock is a minor character in his cover), Steinberg, and the one-and-only Rea Irvin. 

I asked Mr. Bliss if he’d like to comment on our dual peacock drawings, and here’s what he had to say:

That’s crazy! I didn’t get my new issue of The New Yorker yet, so I didn’t even know that was in there.  When I initially did my drawing, from an idea given to me by Steve Martin, I think I mentioned to Emma [Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor] that I wanted it to be in color. Seeing yours now, makes me wonder if they bought yours before they had seen mine and the reason they didn’t buy mine and Steve’s is because they had already bought yours… Similars? Anyway, I think the reason there aren’t that many peacock cartoons out there is because the damn thing is so hard to draw!

__________________________

Rare Book Of Interest: A John M. Price Anthology

Warren Bernard (of SPX fame) has alerted the Spill to another rarity: a cartoon collection of work by John M. Price who contributed four drawings to the magazine (Mr. Bernard tells me that three of Mr. Price’s four New Yorker drawings appear in the collection). Here’s Price’s rather skimpy bio on the A-Z (if anyone out there has more info please send this way):

John M. Price Born  (Pennsylvania?) February 5, 1918, died January 19, 2009, Radnor, Pennsylvania. New Yorker work: February 17, 1940, March 9, 1940, June 8, 1941, and August 30, 1941. His work appeared in many publications, including The Saturday Evening Post, Esquire, The Country Gentleman, and Colliers. Key collection (self published) Don’t Get Polite with Me.

*Chris Wheeler’s fabulous site also has a scan of Price’s book (including the back cover), but I have to admit the cover never registered in my brain’s cartoon catalog. Now, having registered it, the book becomes a must-have for the Spill‘s library.  

____________________

A Daily Shouts By…

Sara Lautman, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, contributed yesterday’s Daily Shouts.

 

 

___________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

 

An Avi Steinberg summer vacation/global warming cartoon. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.  More about him here on Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils.