The Weekend Spill: A Booth Exhibit; New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry; Events Of Interest With Liana Finck; The Tilley Watch Online For August 19-23, 2019

A Booth Exhibit

There’s a brand new George Booth exhibit up and running at Gallery North out on Long Island. All the info here.

George Booth’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

George Booth (photo taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: June 14, 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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New Blitt’s Kvetchbook Entry

Trump + Golf + Greenland,  courtesy of Mr. Blitt.

See it here.

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

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Events of Interest With Liana Finck

Tis nearing the season for promotional events tied-in to Liana Finck’s upcoming collection, Excuse Me: Cartoons, Complaints, and Notes to Self, due September 24th from Random House Trade Paperbacks. Brooklyn’s Books Are Magic will host an event on October 3rd (scroll down to October 3rd), and The Commonwealth Club (out in San Fran) will hold an event on October 14th.

Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

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A listing of New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts during the past week (August 19 -23)

The Daily Cartoon:

Farley Katz, Tim Hamilton (twice), Jeremy Nguyen, and Mark Thompson.

Daily Shouts: “Achievable Ways To Feel Accomplished” by Julia Edelman and Ginny Hogan. Illustrated by Will McPhail; “Larson’s Guide To Odd Birds Of New York City” by Maggie Larson.

All these and more can be found here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue Of August 5 & 12, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Cover: Lotsa ice cream on Olimpia Zagnoli’s second New Yorker cover. I’m immediately reminded of any number of early Vogue covers.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

…a newbie: Lisa Rothstein is the 22nd new cartoonist added to the magazine’s stable this year, and the 48th new cartoonist added since cartoon editor Emma Allen’s tenure began in May 2017.

The Cartoons: quite the surprise seeing a cartoon (on p.61) by the late great Jack Ziegler.  It got me to wondering if perhaps The New Yorker might set up a special online section for the contributors who left us with a lot of work still in the bank (or, as originally designated, “on the bank” — that is,  work bought, but not yet published). When William Steig passed away there was a rumor that hundreds of his drawings (and some covers) were still on the bank. One wonders about the on the bank work of Charles Barsotti, as well as Mr. Ziegler, Leo Cullum, and Michael Crawford, to name but a few dear departed colleagues. Wouldn’t it be great to see this work gathered online.  

Also of interest in this double issue: a cartoon by the one-and-only Sam Gross, who celebrates his 50th year at The New Yorker in August. His first New Yorker drawing appeared in the issue of August 23, 1969 (the Spill will further note the occasion on August 23, 2019).

Speaking of Jack Ziegler, Ed Steed’s squid drawing (p. 37) calls to mind Mr. Ziegler’s classic squid drawing from the issue of September 16, 1996 (it was also used as the cover drawing, and title of Ziegler’s 2004 food cartoon anthology). A quick search for squid cartoons in the Cartoon Bank’s database brought up just two other squid drawings: this one by Danny Shanahan, and this one by Farley Katz).

Also of note:

… J.A.K.’s drawing (p.21) — my fave Jason Adam Katzenstein drawing of all time (so far)

…Chris Ware’s 8 page “Mr. Ware” (he talks about it here).

… Sizing of drawings this issue: most seem right on the money (examples: Sam Gross’s, Zach Kanin’s, Roz Chast’s, Lars Kenseth’s).

…:A goodly number of non-human centric drawings this issue: cockroaches (McNair), the aforementioned squid by Mr. Steed, a bull (McNamee), a parrot (Gross), a blender (Chast), hugging dogs (Rothstein), rocks (Hwang), shishto peppers (Kenseth).

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (it appeared for 92 years) disappeared in the Spring of 2017 (read about it here) — replaced by — gasp! — a redraw (not redrawn by Mr. Irvin, who passed away in 1972). Will the original ever return? Here it is until then:

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, on opinions/films.

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: More And More MAD; Photo: Chatfield At A Snazzy Drawing Board; Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of July 22-26, 2019; A New Comics Journal Column; Interview Of Interest: Paul “How To Read Nancy” Karasik

 

More And More MAD

From The Daily Cartoonist, July 27, 2019,  “We’re All MAD Here  (Paeans To The Magazine)”

D.D. Degg gathers cartoonist MAD pieces.

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Chatfield At A Snazzy Drawing Board

Courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole, this photo of Jason Chatfield at a drawing board at Dick Blick Art Supplies* last Thursday.

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

His website here.

*this isn’t a Spill commercial endorsement.

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A weekend roundup of the New Yorker cartoonists whose work appeared on newyorker.com‘s Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

Daily Cartoon contributors this week: J.A.K., David Sipress, Barry Blitt, Ellis Rosen, and Brendan Loper.

Daily Shouts contributors this week: Roz Chast (in her recurring Cut & Paste series), Farley Katz (in his recurring Cooking Cartoonist series), and Julia Wertz.

See all of the above, and more, here.

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A New Comics Journal Column/Columnist

There’s almost nothing the Spill likes more than a site that leads to other sites — and now there’s a new one.  From The Comics Journal, July 26, 2019, “You Build Walls, We’re Gonna Probably Dig Holes (This Week’s Links)”this new column of “links relating…to comics” by Ryan Flanders, who told us in his recent TCJ article about MAD, that he “was a member of the MAD Art Department, though my roles spilled into editorial, talent scouting and the amorphous responsibility of ‘coming up with new ideas.'”  You’ll find a sprinkle or two of New Yorker cartoonists mentioned in this first column.

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Interview Of Interest: Paul “How To Read Nancy” Karasik

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From The LA Review of Books, July 27, 2019, “It Takes A Deep Reading. and an Obsession: An Interview With Paul Karasik.”

Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Recalling A New Yorker Giant: Charles Saxon

A Hamburglar cartoon by Farley Katz, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Mr. Katz has also contributed today’s Daily Shouts.

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Recalling A New Yorker Giant: Charles Saxon

Over this past weekend a number of visiting colleagues paused to look at a Charles Saxon original drawing that hangs on a wall here at Spill headquarters. The Saxon drawing is displayed because it amuses and inspires (the same goes for the several dozen others also on our walls by various New Yorker artists past and present; the earliest drawing, by Alice Harvey, was published October of 1925, the most recent, by Ed Steed, was published in April of 2019). Saxon’s drawings have long been considered a high bar by his peers — a reminder of how elegant (a word used by one of the visitors) cartoon art can be (I’ve always felt Thurber’s drawings to be another kind of high bar).

Looking closely at the originals in the Spill‘s archives, I see no under -drawing, no pencil marks. The work, in grease pencil(?), appears to be in the school of — as Edward Sorel would describe it — direct drawing.  The lines seem effortless, energetic, lovely, and of course, humorous; it’s an immediately identifiable style. As with so many of his contemporaries, including Robert Weber, Lee Lorenz, James Stevenson and Frank Modell, there’s a joy to the work.

Saxon’s world, both New Yorker covers and cartoons, published from the mid 1940s through the late 1980s, will forever be linked to Connecticut country club country, where he lived (Mr. Saxon, along with his colleague William Hamilton, had that upper-crusty world down). The New Yorker readership from that social strata apparently loved seeing themselves poked and prodded, just as they loved what Peter Arno had done with them and to them in the magazine’s earlier decades. 

Right: a Saxon New Yorker cover: effortless, energetic, humorous

I was fortunate enough to meet Saxon in February of 1986, when New Yorker cover artist Roxie Munro threw a small post-New Yorker anniversary party. Trudging downtown from the Pierre Hotel to Ms. Munro’s mid-town apartment on lower Park Avenue, I was one of the first to arrive. Walking into the living room I found a short man, in dark suit and tie, standing with his back against a living room wall. I introduced myself, not knowing who I was about to shake hands with. I had always imagined Saxon as quite tall — a powerhouse figure. In truth, he was perhaps a half-foot shorter than me. He was also remarkably soft spoken, and extremely polite. I’d always expected that he’d have one of those personalities that would roll right over me. It was quite a nice gift, to able to have perhaps fifteen minutes with this cartoon god, all to myself. 

 

Photo: Charles Saxon, center, with The New Yorker‘s Art Editor, James Geraghty at the magazine’s offices, 25 West 43rd Street, New York City, c.1960s.  Photo courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon.

Book: Oh, happy, happy, happy!  The earliest Saxon collection, published in 1960 by Golden Press.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon; A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts; Fave Photo Of The Day

The Cover:  I see destructive tourists at the core of this cover, yet destruction doesn’t come up in Joost Swarte’s interview with The New Yorker‘s art director, Francoise Mouly.  Odd?

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Almost a theme issue, of sorts:  Amy Hwang (cats), Roz Chast (dogs), Farley Katz (flamingos), Joe Duffy (pigs), Kendra Allenby (deer), Frank Cotham (a snake), Shannon Wheeler (snails), Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (a rat).

Steering briefly away from the Spill‘s focus, I have to note that Salman Rushdie’s piece in the issue  is titled “The Little King” and the accompanying illustration (by Nico Schweitzer) is a play on Otto Soglow‘s famous character. The illustration seems even closer to the toy Little King than the drawing of the King :

 

 

Applause for Bob Eckstein‘s shuttlecock drawing on page 48, and Ellis Rosen‘s heralded fellow drawing on page 42.

 

From the Department of fun coincidences. Liana Finck’s lifeguard drawing (p. 33) immediately reminded me of an obscure original Lee Lorenz drawing hanging here at Spill headquarters. The Lorenz drawing (its barely legible caption: “Help!”) was not in The New Yorker.  I’ve yet to figure out where it was published, or how old it is.  Mr. Lorenz, visiting here and seeing the drawing, could not recall where it had appeared or its vintage. It appears to be in an earlier Lorenz style (but not the earliest), so we can at least place in an early-to-mid 1960s time frame.

Ms. Finck’s drawing and Mr. Lorenz’s are in some ways opposites of each other. Mr. Lorenz’s beach is overcrowded, while Ms. Finck’s beach is empty.  Ms. Finck’s life guard offers help (if helped); Mr. Lorenz’s life guard is crying out for help. What ties them together, at least for me, is the graphic core of each drawing: the exceptionally tall life guard stand. Fine fun work by both. 

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (below) left us in the Spring of 2017 after 92 years of service — it was replaced by a redraw.  Let’s hope the real thing returns before long.  Read about it here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist And Cartoon

Brendan Loper makes good use of oven mitts. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

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A Julia Wertz Daily Shouts

“Conversations With Ma: Paint The Toenails And Board-Game Gripes” 

— A series? by Julia Wertz who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

A crowd of folks who draw got together yesterday in Rhinebeck, New York.  Left to right: myself, Peter Steiner, John Cuneo, R.O. Blechman, Liza Donnelly, Bill Plympton, Danny Shanahan and Elwood Smith.