The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 27, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

The Cover: A standup paddle boarder in the shadow of The Brooklyn Bridge. Read about Malika Favre’s eighth New Yorker cover here. (if you go online you’ll see that the little paddleboarder’s been animated. What a world!)

The Cartoonists:

You’ll note New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo’s name in the list, but this is the first time Mr. Cuneo’s name appears among the cartoonists — it’s his New Yorker cartoon debut. Mr. Cuneo is the 13th addition to the magazine’s cartoonist stable this year and the 39th new cartoonist added to the roster since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in May of 2017. 

The Cartoons: Just for fun, as I did here a few weeks ago, I went back a number of years (40 this time) to this date and took a look at the issue’s cartoonists and cartoons. Here’s the line-up from the issue of May 28, 1979:

As with the last time I did this, the number of cartoonists in the back issue is double the number in the present issue (22 in 1979; 11 in 2019). But…as was the case last time, the back issue was far heftier in page count (128) than this latest issue (78), so proportionately, the cartoonists are holding their own, numbers-wise.  The 1979 issue does however feature a wonderful two-and-a- half page Steinberg spread (“Cousins”). 

The Illustrations: The 2019 issue contains 20 color illustrations, including 3 1/2 full page  illustrations. The 1979 issue contains 2 small b&w illustrations.

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A fun thing: The very first cartoon in the 1979 issue is by Jack Ziegler.  Coming across it this morning I remembered that Mr. Ziegler and I briefly discussed the drawing in the Spill‘s two-part 2016 Ziegler interview:

Michael Maslin: Here’s another far eastern themed drawing: Fleetwood Mac. I’ve always loved it because I never understood Fleetwood Mac.

Jack Ziegler: This was a much earlier Fleetwood Mac I was referring to, around the time they got mega platinum. I just needed the name of a band there.

MM: You just imagined this scene?

fleetwood-mac

JZ: Yeah, right. Almost everything I do is as far as the scene background settings – it’s all made up.

MM: What are those little things off to the left on the bottom.

JZ: Oh those are just little houses down the hill. What did you think they were?

[laughter]

MM: Structures of some kind – I just wanted to be sure.

(you can see all of Pt.1 here, and all of Pt. 2 here. The above is found in Pt. 2)

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Rea Irvin: and of course one major difference between the older issue and this week’s issue is that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead was still in its usual spot in 1979. In 2019, the puzzling redraw of Mr. Irvin’s work continues its run. Read about these two designs here. Below: Irvin’s still a-missin’ and missed masthead.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Farley Katz delivers the post Game of Thrones Daily.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

 

 

 

The Online Tilley Watch, The Week Of March 4-8, 2019; Fave Photo Of The Day: Sorel & Gerberg; Elisabeth McNair Pencilled; Interview Of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist Marcellus Hall; Bud Grace On His Second(?) New Yorker Cartoon

The Daily cartoons this week were brought to us by Brendon Loper, Farley Katz, Peter Kuper, Tim Hamilton, and JAK (Jason Adam Katzenstein).  A mixed-bag, thematically, with three outta five of the cartoons Trumpish.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Amy Hwang, Ed Steed, and Ali Soloman.

See all of the above, and more, here.

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Fave Photo Of The Day: Sorel & Gerberg

Meant to post this a few weeks back. It was taken at The New York Historical Society opening for Mort Gerberg’s exhibit.  That’s Mr. Gerberg on the left and the great Edward Sorel on the right.

The exhibit, “Mort Gerberg Cartoons: A New Yorker’s Perspective” runs through May 5th.

(photo used with permission of Mr. Gerberg).

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Elisabeth McNair Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful Case For Pencils continues with the spotlight on Elisabeth McNair (above) and her tools of the trade.  Ms. McNair’s first New Yorker drawing appeared in the July 30, 2018 issue.  See the post here.

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Interview Of Interest: Cover Artist Marcellus Hall

From DART (Design Arts Daily), March 7, 2019, “The DART Interview: Marcellus Hall”

Mr. Marcellus’s first New Yorker cover appeared in 2005. Link here to his website.

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Bud Grace On His 2nd New Yorker Cartoon

Bud Grace, writes on his blog about his second New Yorker drawing, and a particularly good edit by the then cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz.

Not to be too nit-picky about this, but Mr. Grace identifies the above as his second New Yorker cartoon, yet I’m unable to find his first on the New Yorker‘s database. Perhaps he sold two, and only one (the one above)  appeared? Mr. Grace, if you see this,  please advise.

 

 

 

Book On The Horizon…”A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Audio Of Interest: Roz Chast; Audio Of Interest: Bob Eckstein: Chris Ware In School; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

Coming this July from Ohio State University Press,  A Mile And A Half of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber.

Edited by Michael Rosen, with contributions from Rosemary Thurber, Liza Donnelly, Seymour Chwast, Ian Frazier, and yours truly.

From the publisher:

Humorist, cartoonist, writer, playwright. James Thurber was to the twentieth century what Mark Twain was to the nineteenth. At one point, his books were the most read of any American in the world. His work could be found anywhere—from the pages of the New Yorker to the pages of children’s books, from illustrated advertisements to tea towels and dresses. Now, in celebration of the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth, A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber is a long overdue introduction and reintroduction to James Thurber and the artwork that fundamentally changed American cartoons. Including some 260 drawings, this collection is the first comprehensive focus on his work as an artist, a cartoonist, and an illustrator.

Coinciding with the first major retrospective of Thurber’s art presented by the Columbus Museum of Art in 2019, A Mile and a Half of Lines showcases both classic Thurber as well as visual material never before seen in print.

 

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

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Video of Interest: Liza Donnelly

Liza Donnelly was just out in Silicon Valley live-drawing at the Global Women In Data Science Conference. A short video here about her work

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Here’s her website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

A lot of fun snowman talk in this half -hour radio interview with Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007. (scroll down to February 13, 2019).

Mr. Eckstein is also the editor of this upcoming cartoon anthology:

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Roz Chast

From WBAI (NYC), March 6, 2019, this hour-long interview with Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.  Here’s her website.

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Chris Ware In School

From Skidmore College, March 6, 2019, “Cartoonist Chris Ware Talks Art careers”  — Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.  

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

 Facebook is the subject of today’s Daily, courtesy of cartoonist Farley Katz.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Here’s his website.

 

 

Gahan Wilson GoFundMe Campaign; The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker March 11, 2019; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Jason Adam Katzenstein

As mentioned here yesterday there is a GoFundMe campaign to help the one-and-only Gahan Wilson, who is suffering from severe dementia.  Go here to read much more and to help.

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The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker, March 11, 2019

In this week’s issue…

The Cover: There’s nothing quite like dogs romping in snow, as they are on Gayle Kabaker’s cover. Visit her website here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

1.  Liz Montague makes her debut in the issue. Ms. Montague is the fourth cartoonist to debut this year, and the twenty-eighth new cartoonist brought in since Emma Allen became the magazine’s cartoon editor in May of 2017.

2. There are two — count ’em, two — desert island drawings in this issue.  One by Tom Chitty, and the other by Pia Guerra (it appears on the Caption Contest page).

3. Applause Applause: Lars Kenseth’s couple in previews (p.53) and Farley Katz’s undersized load (p.67).

The Talk Of The Town Masthead:

Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead is still a-missin’ — read about it here.

Until it returns, if it ever does (perish the thought!), here’s what it looks like:

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, weather-related, is by JAK.  Mr. Katzenstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.