The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 6, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: A heart-strings reflection of the issue’s Health Issue theme (but it’s tempting to believe we’d see a cover along these lines even if it wasn’t the Health Issue).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An umbrella observation from the get-go:  the abundance of color pieces (one by Roz Chast, one by Emily Flake, and one by Liana Finck) in this issue at times kind’ve almost sorta made it feel as if I was paging through a Cartoon Issue. However, unlike the special pieces found in Cartoon Issues of yore, all three of these new pieces are distinctly linked to one subject (can you guess what it might be?).

There are a number of cartoons in this issue that got my attention, beginning with Barbara Smaller’s (p.26) — my favorite Smaller drawing thus far this year. Also eye-catching: Justin Sheen’s castle & moat drawing; Brendan Loper’s getting away from it all cartoon, and Ed Steed’s survivor. All four enjoy a sharply written caption.

A number of drawings (beyond the color pieces mentioned above)  are either directly related to, or can be seen as related to the coronavirus, foremost being Joe Dator’s terrif drawing (p.69), P.C. Vey’s (p.31), and Mr. Loper’s cartoon on page 39. Tom Chitty’s friendly city drawing (p.57), as well as John O’Brien’s drawing (on page 72) could possibly be read as corona-related cartoons. The folks in Mr. O’Brien’s supermarket all seem to be spaced at least six feet apart, but, as with most all of Mr. O’Brien’s drawings, it’s an evergreen.

The remaining four drawings: Sofia Warren’s, Amy Hwang’s, Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s, and an effort from the Bliss/Martin duo, are comic relief unrelated to the health crisis.

Paperwork: the aforementioned Justin Sheen is new to the New Yorker cartoonist fold. He’s the 4th new cartoonist of 2020, and the 57th new cartoonist brought into The New Yorker since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Read about Rea Irvin’s mothballed iconic Talk masthead (above) here.

And This:

Just noticed that The New Yorker‘s Facebook New Yorker Cartoons page received a make-over. The new look is shown below — new (old) typography, and a (recycled) Rea Irvin inspired banana peel-inspecting Tilley icon replacing Christoph Niemann’s guy at a table icon. Mr. Niemann’s icon showed up in the Spring of 2017, and replaced an existing icon — a drawing by Jack Ziegler.  It puzzled me at the time (and thereafter) that work by a non-New Yorker cartoonist (Mr. Niemann) was chosen to replace an icon drawn by an iconic New Yorker cartoonist.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Kendra Allenby on the newest normal.

Ms. Allenby began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Avi Steinberg gives us “Things That Used To Be Annoying But Are Now A Comfort” — Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

The Wednesday Spill: New Yorker Folks At SXSW 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Fave Photo Of The Day

New Yorker Folks At SXSW 2020

From SXSW’s schedule, here are several events featuring various New Yorker folks.

On March 14th, 2020, a talk by veteran New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly: ‘Humor Connects Us”  

On March 15, 2020, “New Yorker Cartoons In Augmented Reality” with the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, cartoonist Liana Finck, and others.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on moving the impeachment hearings.

Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.

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Fave Photo Of The Day

Here’s a photo from the Spill archives of a family cat settled down in front of a Jack Ziegler original. The drawing, titled The Jungle Never Sleeps, appeared in The New Yorker,  July 28, 1980.

 

The Weekend Spill: Chuck Jones’s Eustace; The Cartoon Takeover Issue; The Tilley Watch Online, December 22-28, 2019

Here’s something new to me: the great Chuck Jones  take-off on Eustace Tilley. The poster can be found here.

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The Cartoon Takeover

It was an exciting week in The New Yorker cartoon world, what with the arrival of the magazine’s first ever Cartoon Takeover issue (covered here last Monday). For everyone who says that the first thing they turn to in the magazine is the cartoons, you had a lot to turn to.

Read about the issue in this piece, “The Cartoon Department Coup” by Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor.

Fingers crossed this special issue becomes a yearly thing, leading up to the magazine’s super-duper anniversary in 2025.

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The Tilley Watch Online: An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features.

Artists contributing to newyorker.com are of two stripes: some contribute solely to the online magazine, and others cross-over from print to online. For now, only the artists appearing in print are listed on the Spill‘s A-Z. Artists solely appearing online are italicized below.

The Daily Cartoon: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Paul Karasik, David Ostow, Felipe Galindo, Benjamin Slyngstad.

Daily Shouts: J.A.K., Olivia de Recat, Ali Fitzgerald.

And…

From Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “The Latest On J.D. Salinger Unearthed”

“The New Yorker Cartoons For The Holidays” — by Colin Stokes, the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker “Cartoon Takeover” Issue Of December 30, 2019

The Cover: The “Cartoon Takeover” theme begins on Robert Sikoryak’s cover as cartoon characters whitewash text. Read a Q&A with the cover artist here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Right off the bat, it should be noted that this issue is unlike the “Cartoon Issue” once produced this time of the year beginning in 1997; that series ended after a fifteen year run. It is also unlike the “Best Cartoons Of The Year” series begun in 2011, and ended five years later. This Cartoon Takeover is unlike those in that it contains a ton of archival material (the issue carries the descriptive “A Semi-Archival Issue” on the Table of Contents). While elements from the Cartoon Issues, and Best Of series are here: the graphic spreads for instance, and a profile of a cartoonist — the old tropes features thankfully haven’t resurfaced. This Takeover is a new and welcome creature, with a pulse I associate with the very oldest issues of The New Yorker.  As befits the issue’s theme, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, has taken over Talk’s “Comments” section, leading us into the action.

As you see from the number of cartoonists listed above, this new issue is packed with cartoons from a wide swath of the New Yorker‘s history, with work by such luminaries as Helen Hokinson, Barbara Shermund, James Thurber, William Steig, Gahan Wilson, and Steinberg represented. Nice to see Peter Arno’s ultra-famous, “Well, back to the old drawing board” included! Many cartoons from the archives are here as “favorites” selected by cartoonists and non-cartoonists. Free standing cartoons — what you normally see in every issue of The New Yorker — are also from the archives. I was very happy to see one of my favorite semi-modern cartoons included: Joe Duffy’s meta Care to join me in panel #3? (originally published, October 31, 2011).

Not whitewashed over by cartoon characters is a personal favorite John Updike piece (originally published in 1997) on his cartoonist roots, and terrif archival pieces, including two by two late-greats, Veronica Geng and Dorothy Parker. It’s an issue of a little something, and often a lot of something, for just about everyone who loves New Yorker cartoons.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch: Normally on the Monday Tilley Watch I woefully acknowledge another issue gone by without the return of Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead.  Since the Spring of 2017, a redrawn version has stood awkwardly in its place. This special Cartoon Takeover issue thankfully replaces the redraw with an Ed Steed take on the Irvin masthead. Mr. Steed’s playfulness is a refreshing delight, incorporating, to my eye, some Steigian/Steinberg elements.

With next week’s issue of The New Yorker the first of 2020, this would be the perfect opportunity to use Mr.Steed’s comic break as the moment to bring back Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead — and really now, why not bring it back?

Below, Mr. Irvin’s beautiful, now moth-balled masthead, and Mr. Steed’s fun take below it.

The Weekend Spill: A Whither Now? MAD Dartboard; The Online Tilley Watch: December 16 -20, 2019; From The Archives: 1984 “The New Yorker” Cartoonists Traveling Exhibit Poster

A Whither Now? MAD Dartboard

MAD was in the news not long ago when it announced it was no longer going to turn out a brand new content-filled magazine, but rely instead on reprinting older material.  Now the folks at MAD have (sort of) given its readers a game of choice. The below graphic piece appears in the February 2020 issue, along with the news that famed artist Al Jaffee will no longer do the fold-in back page after a gazillion years of doing so.

The Online Tilley Watch, December 16-20, 2019

An end of the week list of New Yorker artists* who contributed to newyorker.com features.

* artists contributing to newyorker.com are of two stripes: some contribute solely to the online magazine, and others cross-over from print to online.  For now, only the artists appearing in print are listed on the Spill‘s A-Z.

 

 

The Daily Cartoon: Ellis Rosen, Brooke Bourgeois, Ali Solomon, Avi Steinberg, Ellie Black.

Daily Shouts: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Ali Solomon.

and…

Instagram’s Favorite New Yorker Cartoons Of 2019…by The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.

Not-To-Be-Missed Shouts Of 2019…by The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

All of the above, and more, can be seen here.

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From The Archives: 1984 “The New Yorker” Cartoonists Traveling Exhibit Poster

I may, or may not, have posted this once before — if so, it was quite awhile ago. It’s a great at-a-glance look at The New Yorker‘s cartoon stable, mid 1980s (with a few departed stable mates work included:  Peter Arno, and R.Taylor, among them).