The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 27, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

The Cover: A standup paddle boarder in the shadow of The Brooklyn Bridge. Read about Malika Favre’s eighth New Yorker cover here. (if you go online you’ll see that the little paddleboarder’s been animated. What a world!)

The Cartoonists:

You’ll note New Yorker cover artist, John Cuneo’s name in the list, but this is the first time Mr. Cuneo’s name appears among the cartoonists — it’s his New Yorker cartoon debut. Mr. Cuneo is the 13th addition to the magazine’s cartoonist stable this year and the 39th new cartoonist added to the roster since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in May of 2017. 

The Cartoons: Just for fun, as I did here a few weeks ago, I went back a number of years (40 this time) to this date and took a look at the issue’s cartoonists and cartoons. Here’s the line-up from the issue of May 28, 1979:

As with the last time I did this, the number of cartoonists in the back issue is double the number in the present issue (22 in 1979; 11 in 2019). But…as was the case last time, the back issue was far heftier in page count (128) than this latest issue (78), so proportionately, the cartoonists are holding their own, numbers-wise.  The 1979 issue does however feature a wonderful two-and-a- half page Steinberg spread (“Cousins”). 

The Illustrations: The 2019 issue contains 20 color illustrations, including 3 1/2 full page  illustrations. The 1979 issue contains 2 small b&w illustrations.

___________________

A fun thing: The very first cartoon in the 1979 issue is by Jack Ziegler.  Coming across it this morning I remembered that Mr. Ziegler and I briefly discussed the drawing in the Spill‘s two-part 2016 Ziegler interview:

Michael Maslin: Here’s another far eastern themed drawing: Fleetwood Mac. I’ve always loved it because I never understood Fleetwood Mac.

Jack Ziegler: This was a much earlier Fleetwood Mac I was referring to, around the time they got mega platinum. I just needed the name of a band there.

MM: You just imagined this scene?

fleetwood-mac

JZ: Yeah, right. Almost everything I do is as far as the scene background settings – it’s all made up.

MM: What are those little things off to the left on the bottom.

JZ: Oh those are just little houses down the hill. What did you think they were?

[laughter]

MM: Structures of some kind – I just wanted to be sure.

(you can see all of Pt.1 here, and all of Pt. 2 here. The above is found in Pt. 2)

_____________________

Rea Irvin: and of course one major difference between the older issue and this week’s issue is that Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead was still in its usual spot in 1979. In 2019, the puzzling redraw of Mr. Irvin’s work continues its run. Read about these two designs here. Below: Irvin’s still a-missin’ and missed masthead.

____________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Farley Katz delivers the post Game of Thrones Daily.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 20, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Joe Dator

The Cover: It’s the Innovators Issue, hence the use of some headings floating in yellow-orangey color fields, like so:

 

  Let’s hope these color fields aren’t permanent innovations.

On the cover: robots by Tom Gauld.  Read what he has to say about his work here. The cover reminded me ever-so-slightly of Peter Arno’s meeting-of-the-dogs cover from the ancient times. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Another week with a cartoonist making their print debut (11 out of 19 issues thus far in 2019).  Kasia Babis is the 11th new cartoonist brought into the magazine’s stable this year, and the 37th cartoonist brought in by Emma Allen since she took the cartoon editor reins in May of 2017.

If the Spill handed out blue ribbons like the now dormant Cartoon Companion once did, I’d pin one on Sam Gross’s snail mail cartoon in the issue (p.30).

Rea Irvin:  A fun innovation this issue would’ve been bringing back something in the magazine that never should’ve gone away: Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. But not this week. Anyway, it appears below in its usual Monday Spill spot.  Read about it here.

_______________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Joe Dator on  fiction and/or/or not fiction.  Visit his website here.

Mr. Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006. 

Note: Mr. Dator, along with several other New Yorker cartoonists (Lars Kenseth and Mort Gerberg among them) will be appearing at this week’s National Cartoonists Society Fest in California. The Daily Cartoonist has all the info here.

 

 

The Tilley Watch, Monday, April 29, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Adam Douglas Thompson

The Cover: This week’s issue sports a wonderful dog-in-the-park cover by John Cuneo. We’re told in a Q & A that it’s his tenth cover for the magazine.  Very nice to see an early version of the cover in the online “Cover Story.” More of Mr. Cuneo’s work can be found on his website. 

The Cartoonists:

The Illustrations: Four-and-a-third full pages this week among the twenty-two illustrations (including photographs, but not including the Talk drawings).

Cartoons: Twelve cartoonists/twelve cartoons. 

This week’s new cartoonist: Evan Lian.  Mr. Lian has previously had a Daily Cartoon.  He is the tenth new cartoonist of the year and the thirty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s editorship.

Duo Effort: A fun cartoon from Pia Guerra and Ian Boothby.

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead:  It’s still a-missin’...read about it here.

______________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Spring selfie flowers by Adam Douglas Thompson (whose first print cartoon was in the issue of April 8, 2019).

 

 

 

Darrin Bell Wins Pulitzer For Editorial Cartooning; The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 22, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Elisabeth McNair; Bliss & Martin, Cont’d

Darrin Bell Wins Pulitzer For Editorial Cartooning

From The Washington Post, April 15, 2019, “How the Trayvon Martin tragedy led to Darrin Bell’s historical editorial cartooning Pulitzer.”  Mr. Bell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Link to his website here.

(Above: Mr. Bell, and one of his New Yorker cartoons, published July 9, 2018)

_____________________

The Cover:  Loveis Wise’s piece is added to the magazine’s collection of “covers about grooming.”  Read about it here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Becky Barnicoat makes her New Yorker debut this week. Ms. Barnicoat is the 8th new cartoonist to join the magazine’s stable this year, the 3rd this month, and the 33rd to be brought in since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

Of note: a double-page “Sketchbook” by Liana Finck.  

The Illustrators (in acknowledgement of their graphic presence per issue, the Spill will, from time-to-time, list the issue’s illustrators):

Philip Montgomery, Tillie Walden, Isabell Seliger, Laura Breiling, Jack Mitchell, Diego Patino, Alec Soth, Amy Lombard, Joost Swarte, Joao Fazenda, Devin Yalken, Luci Gutierrez, Zohar Lazar, Tyler Comrie, (photo courtesy of) Ben Taub), (photo courtesy of) Mohamedou Salahi, Eiko Ojala, Cristiana Couceiro, Ana Galvan, Rune Fisker, John Rogers (photo)/Mike McQuade (illus.), Bendik Kaltenborn

And speaking of illustrators, Christoph Niemann’s redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead remains in place nearly two years after it was installed. For those who wish to read about the original, go here

Below: Mr. Irvin’s Talk Masthead

__________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Dogs and taxes, by Elisabeth McNair.  Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2018.  Link here to her website.

________________

Bliss & Martin, Cont’d

Noted here in late March, Harry Bliss has been working with a high profile gagwriter.  Today there’s news of a book of cartoons in the works.

 

 

 

 

More MoCCA Today (With Photos) & “My First MoCCA”; David Sipress On A 1969 Harvard Protest

More MoCCA Today

At least three New Yorker cartoonist events scheduled today: Liana Finck in conversation with Gabrielle Bell; a “spotlight” on Mark Alan Stamaty; Emily Flake as part of a panel, “Narratives On Motherhood”; cover artist Ivan Brunetti in a panel on “Comics and the Teaching Artist” (right: Ms. Bell and Ms. Finck today. Courtesy of Stephen Nadler).

And more photos from today (all courtesy of Liza Donnelly, with the exception of the Mark Alan Stamaty photo.  That’s another courtesy of Stephen Nadler):

Top row, l-r: Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo, Mark Parisi, Ellis Rosen.

Middle row: Arnold Roth & Caroline Roth, Liza Donnelly, Keith Knight.

Bottom: Mark Alan Stamaty (l), and Bill Kartalopoulos, who, among other things, is MoCCA’s Programming Director, and Series Editor for The Best American Comics series. 

My First MoCCA:  A Personal Take

Judging by the scene I dove into at yesterday’s MoCCA Fest, the appetite for, and practice of comics and cartoons is booming. The place (the Metropolitan West on West 46th Street) was at capacity, loud and energized. I took in the must-see Cartooning For Peace exhibit on the second floor (curated by The New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly) then immediately ran into Dick Buchanan (who for quite some time has been sharing his voluminous cartoon file via Mike Lynch’s site). Mr. Buchanan had told me earlier in the week  that he’d be at the fest, and would bring along a copy of a book I’d never seen before:  Bernard Wiseman’s Cartoon Countdown (published in 1959). Mr. Wiseman contributed 197 cartoons to The New Yorker, from April 19, 1947 – June 11. 1960.

In the pr copy on the first page:

This is the first book of cartoons devoted exclusively  to he Conquest of Space. Let the Russians Match That! 

(to the right: The Cartooning For Peace Exhibit)

With  thanks to Mr. Buchanan for Cartoon Countdown, it was on to a tour of the fest.

 

  The illustrator Tom Bloom was seen engaged in conversation with an exhibitor, the illustrator/educator, Steve Guernaccia blew by (he’s hard to miss, sartorially). The multitude of people, of tables laden with products bearing graphic images, posters, cards, etc., etc., was astounding. Along with me on the tour was one of my co-panelists, Danny Shanahan.  We were moving along at a good pace with the flow of the crowd when a familiar book cover on the New York Review Comics table got our attention: Saul Steinberg’s recently reissued Labyrinth (also on the table were a number of Maira Kalaman titles).  I bet Steinberg would’ve enjoyed the scene passing by his book.

Closing in on the slotted time for our panel with Mort Gerberg, we headed over to Ink48 on 11th Avenue, where the panels took place. Ran into Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery  who reminded us that Mark Alan Stamaty was signing his anniversary edition of MacDoodle Street.

Co-panelist Bob Eckstein awaited us in the Garamond Room, where we were soon joined by Marisa Acocella, and the man of the hour, Mort Gerberg. Spotted in our audience were New Yorker contributors,  R. Sikoryak, and Sophia Warren, as well as friend to all comics creators, Karen Greene of Columbia University. Below photos of the panel courtesy of Mr. Nadler (l-r, Danny Shanahan, Bob Eckstein, myself, Marisa Acocella, and Mr. Gerberg).

One of the fun things to come out of paneling with colleagues is the unexpected nugget or two of New Yorker history. As he discussed selling his first cartoon to The New Yorker back in 1965 , Mr. Gerberg told us — and this is something I had never heard, and didn’t realize was even possible — that he had talked the then art editor, James Geraghty into allowing what was supposed to be a bought idea of Mr. Gerberg’s to become a bought drawing. New Yorker history buffs know that it was routine at the magazine back then to buy ideas and give them to established cartoonists. It’s quite a thing that Mr. Gerberg, with his first sale to the magazine, was not only able to buck that well-entrenched system, but to deliver the full page below (published in October 20,1965).

  After our panel concluded we panelists stayed in the same room to attend the next panel,  “Professional Development 101: Art Directors Roundtable.” How could we not –it included our very own cartoon editor, Emma Allen. As we moved into the audience we spotted fellow colleagues, Kendra Allenby, Tracey Berglund, and cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey. Ms. Allen was joined by Matt Lubchansky (of The Nib), Alexandra Zsigmond (formerly The New York Times), Will Varner (formerly Buzzfeed), and artist/educator, Viktor Koen, who moderated.  The “101” in the panel title was accurate — we heard what the scene was like for today’s beginning illustrator/artists trying to break in. One piece of advice from Ms. Allen that stood out for me:  something that would make her laugh while looking at [written and drawn] humor for four hours in a day, had an excellent shot.

By the way, the place was packed.

_____________________

David Sipress On A Harvard Protest In 1969

Mr. Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998, has a Personal History piece on newyorker.com: “Fake News, 1969: My Slightly Infamous Role In The Harvard Antiwar Protests”