The Wednesday Watch: Playboy Will End Its Print Edition; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Playboy Will End Its Print Edition

From WWD, March 18, 2020, “Playboy Magazine Ceases Print Edition After 66 Years”

The magazine’s Spring 2020 issue will be its last print edition. An online edition will continue (the magazine says “special” issues may appear next year).  For many years, in the latter part of the Golden Age of Cartoons, as magazines that carried cartoons failed, Playboy emerged as the next best market (after The New Yorker), pay-wise, for single panel cartoonists. Like The New Yorker, the magazine had an anchor stable of artists, some of them on contract. In recent years the magazine dropped cartoons, and then brought some back.

Here’s further reading on  Hugh Hefner, aspiring cartoonist turned Playboy founder.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Getting to know you, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“How I Wish To Receive Notifictions” by Emily Flake, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.

Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s); Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Blog Posts Of Interest From Mike Lynch

   Cartoonist Mike Lynch has posted two back-to-back New Yorker items of interest on his blog. Today’s is a look at some of Steinberg’s drawings from All In Line (the 1947 paperback edition), and yesterday a piece on a film about New Yorker cover artist Andre Francois. See them here.

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

Andre Francois’s entry on the A-Z:

Andre Francois (photo: 1978) Birth/death information from his New York Times obit of April 15, 2005: Born Andre Farkas, 1915, Timisoara. Died, April, 2005, Grisy-les-Platres, France.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Emily Bernstein, who began contributing to The New Yorker in July of last year, on shopping now. Yesterday’s Daily was by Emily Flake, who began contributing to the magazine in 2007.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts

A trio effort by cartoonist Jeremy Nguyen, along with writers Irving Raun, and Julia Edelman. Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 23, 2020: No GOAT

The Cover: This week’s cover, by Christoph Niemann is right on the money. The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, has a Q&A with the artist here.

Historical Note:  this is the first issue of The New Yorker  not to include a Goings On About Town section. A notice appears on this week’s Table of Contents.

A potted history of GOAT (as it’s sometimes affectionately called)

The very first issue of The New Yorker  included a “conscientious calendar of events worth while” called Goings On.  The very first Goings On was just one page, near the back of the book. Below is the heading of that first Goings On.

The Goings On heading survived up through the issue of October 31, 1925. Goings On About Town was used for the very first time in the next issue (November 7, 1925). Goings On About Town was moved to the very front of the magazine in the issue of January 23, 1926.

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And now back to the present…and this week’s issue.

The Cartoonists:

Once again, I’ve posted the entire listing of artists as this week’s Spots are by the fab cover artist, Marcellus Hall.

There is a newbie this week: Matilda Borgstrom, who is the third new cartoonist to enter The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists this year, and the fifty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

The Cartoons:

There are, as you would expect, a number of cartoons (“Drawings”) this week reflecting directly or indirectly the times we’re in: Roz Chast’s store front sign referencing hand sanitizer and face masks, Frank Cotham’s castle cleaning crew, Liza Donnelly’s kitchen full of fermented food, Emily Flake’s monster coming out of a closet.

The remaining cartoons take us away for awhile– as we’d want them to; the variety includes a mermaid, a couple of cowboys, a typing kitty, stargazers…and more.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Virus, or no virus, the watch continues. Read about Mr. Irvin’s moth-balled iconic Talk masthead here.

Here’s what we’re no longer seeing:

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 2, 2020

The Cover: As mentioned last Friday, Barry Blitt‘s Bloomberg exploding cigar cover (above) was rush-released. Here’s a short piece about the cover’s subject by magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.

The Cartoonists

The Cartoons

A likely too-deep-in-the-weeds observation: I believe (someone please correct me if I’m wrong!) this is the first issue of the magazine in contemporary times composed fully of stable mates whose entry into the stable dates back no further than the early 1990s (Frank Cotham, who began contributing in 1993 is this week’s elder, with 27 years at The New Yorker). On the flip side, you might recall that the last issue of the magazine (the 95th anniversary issue) contained a drawing by Edward Koren, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. A deep (cartoonist) bench remains at The New Yorker.

Here’s the rundown of this week’s cartoonists, in order of their freshman year:

Frank Cotham (1993); William Haefeli (1998); David Sipress (1998); Joe Dator (2006); Julia Suits (2006); Emily Flake (2008); Amy Hwang (2010); Liana Finck (2013); Lars Kenseth (2016); Maggie Larson (2017); Liz Montague (2019).

Two cartoons in the issue that caught my attention both feature non-humans. David Sipress‘s stand-up kitty, and Joe Dator‘s opposum/possum. Also noted: Ed Steed‘s (sort’ve Ben Shahn-esque) full page illustration for Adam Levin’s fiction piece.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Read about Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead,shown directly below.  Below it is the redrawn version plugged-in Spring of 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 3, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: a snowy bridge. Read the Q&A with the cover artist here, and see the pretty digital snowflakes fall.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

In a throw back to earlier Monday Tilley Watches, I’ll take a quick tour through all the cartoons in the issue; a mostly text-driven drive-by of the work.

The first drawing, by David Sipress, references the recent demise of Mr. Peanut (is he really gone, or was it just a dream?). The topic of the late legume was recently covered here.

…Julia Suits’s pirate in cargo shorts on a gangplank is next (cannot see cargo shorts/pants on a New Yorker cartoon character without thinking of the below cargo pants drawing by the late great Leo Cullum — it appeared in The New Yorker,  August 17, 1998:

…The third cartoon (oh, alright: drawing) in the issue belongs to Barbara Smaller, who’s been contributing to the magazine since 1996.  A bedroom, a married couple, and a reasonable question.

…next is a Zach Kanin poker game (assuming it’s poker — I see chips on the table). I really like the three card players Mr. Kanin has drawn. The fellow to the left looks a little like Ernest Borgnine (with a pinch of Broderick Crawford tossed in?):

To me, the guy on the far right resembles Mandy Patinkin.

…next up: Liana Finck on an age-old flooring concern. Nice floating ghost.

…Harry Bliss and one of his collaborators (Steve Martin) address a potential problem for passengers on one of those floating mini-cities sailing the seven seas.

…five pages later: an Emily Flake drawing far far removed from her usual style and cartoon concerns. Think Hindenburg disaster mashed with social media done in a sort of Stuart Leeds style.

…on page 45, a Tersa Burns Parkhurst retirement party. Dunno why but the cartoon reminds me of MAD magazine’s Dave Berg’s “Lighter Side Of…” drawings (that’s a good thing!).

…on page 43 is a drawing by Mick Stevens, one of the most veteran artists in this issue.  He began contributing in December of 1979 (Roz Chast in this issue with a full page color Sketchbook, beats him out by more than a year– her first drawing appeared in June of 1978).  I wonder if the male dancing bird in Mr. Stevens’s drawing was originally in color. Either way (color, or b&w), a fab cartoon.

…David Borchart’s auto rental drawing (page 43) gets a Spill gold star for the use of the word “rassle.” Zeke, the fellow that’s prepared to rassle, is also mighty terrific.

…On page 54 is an Ed Steed drawing that at first glance reminds me of Zach Kanin’s in this same issue, but only because, in both drawings, the viewer is seeing a table front and center and from near precisely the same angle. Instead of card players (as seen in Mr. Kanin’s drawing) we have animated garden utensils and tools. They’re plotting something.

…next up is a Robert Leighton drawing of mountain climbers.  I love how Mr. Leighton has immediately tossed us into a situation that would normally demand the best possible equipment available. You gotta feel for the climber who came unprepared.

…Thoroughly enjoyed  — as usual with Lars Kenseth’s work — his drawing of campers situated down on the ground, and in much nicer weather than Mr. Leighton’s. Look at the care he took in adding the reflection of the moon on the lake.

…next up is a three panel hat x-ray drawing by Liza Donnelly ( who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982). This drawing answers the oft-asked question of what could possibly occupy all that beanie air space. Love the kitty!

Lastly, Adam Douglas Thompson (the most junior artist in this issue — his first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of April 8, 2019) gives us a sort of contemporary Chon Day drawing (it’s on page 68). “Sort of” because Mr. Thompson’s line and Mr. Day’s line have different flows.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

This man (Rea Irvin) is wondering what happened to his beautiful Talk masthead design (shown below). You know — the one that appeared in The New Yorker for 92 years, not the re-draw that’s been around since May of 2017.  Who took the iconic masthead away, and why, and where oh where can it be? Actually, the answer to the first question is easy. Perhaps the last question is easy as well.  It likely resides in a file on a desktop, easily accessed. The question of why is the puzzler. Read more about its disappearance here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Daily Cartoon: by Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…and a Daily Shouts by J. A. K., who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.