The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 13, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

To my readers: This being the time we’re in, the online issue has not yet been posted (as of 11:00am), so what follows is a shortened version of The Monday Tilley Watch. Long-time visitors might recall I prefer first sightings of new cartoons in situ, but in order to provide at least some basic info, I’ve gone to the slideshow (it’s posted here — scroll way down).

The Cover: The last time we saw a Pascal Campion cover (Jan.6, 2020) the Spill pointed out its uncanny resemblance to an Arthur Getz cover from 1965. This week Mr. Campion speaks with The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, about Mr. Getz’s (and Sempe’s) influence on his work.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Just as The New Yorker ran a good number of war cartoons during World War II (enough to fill an Album of war cartoons), we are beginning to see a number of corona virus-related cartoons during this particular war. In the latest issue, five of the eleven cartoons are tied-in to the virus, with another few possibly so.

Update after the digital edition was posted: a color strip by Ed Steed is also virus-related.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Talk Masthead Watch:

Without access to the digital edition, I can’t say for sure that Christoph Niemann’s Talk masthead redraw(!) still appears instead of Mr. Irvin’s iconic masthead.  If I had to guess, I’d say the real deal (just below) is still on a shelf, waiting to be dusted off.

Update after the digital edition was posted: the redraw remains…for now.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Jeremy Nguyen on what everyone’s doing again.

Mr. Nguyen began contributing to The New Yorker in

2017. Visit his website here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Unboxing A Box Of Steinbergs & Steigs; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 2-6, 2020; James Stevenson Documentary At Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest; More Spills…

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So often when I go on a hunt for something in the Spill‘s archives I come upon some other thing that takes me off onto another track. Today for instance, while poking around piles of boxes, I came across the box you see above.  Many years ago I filled the box with issues of The New Yorker bearing  Steinberg covers and Steig covers — then I stuck a label on the box and put the box on a shelf where it remained unopened for at least a decade, if not more. Today I opened the box and placed most of the issues out on a table.

Gems all! Maybe a dozen more issues didn’t make it into the photograph, but you get the idea. What I find interesting about this group is that I cannot remember why I bothered to gather these particular issues.

After photographing them, I put them all back in their beat-up box. I have plans to incorporate them into the loose issue New Yorker collection — but not today; maybe in 2030, when I come across the box again.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features this past week

The Daily Cartoon: Christopher Weyant, David Sipress, Ellis Rosen, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon.

Daily Shouts: Ward Sutton.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

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Sally Williams fab 2019 documentary Stevenson Lost & Found will be shown March 29th at The Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest. Info here.  Lucky you if you’re on the island and able to attend.

Mr. Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson was a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He was a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, published in 2013, is essential reading.  Sally Williams’ 2019 documentary film, Stevenson Lost & Found is essential viewing.

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…Just a few days ago while browsing through a bound volume of New Yorkers I came across a drawing by Ihrie Means (in the issue of May 14, 2007). Ms. Means name has now been added to the Spill‘s A-Z. My apologies for not adding her sooner.

…Work by Liz Montague, a newer addition to the New Yorker’s stable (March, 2019), is in (A Mini) Zine Fest, later this month.  Details here.

…The late great Syd Hoff‘s name came up in yesterday’s New York Times crossword puzzle: the clue (if that’s what it’s called — I’m not a crossword puzzler) was Cartoonist Hoff. 

Here’s Syd Hoff’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Syd Hoff ( Photo source: Esquire Cartoon album, 1957) Born 1912, New York City, died May 12, 2004, Miami Beach, Florida. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1975. Visit the Syd Hoff website here.

 

A New Charles Addams Collection!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

An early afternoon trip to my local independent bookstore turned up a surprise: Addams’ Apple: The New York Cartoons of Charles Addams (Pomegranate); Foreword by Sarah M. Henry (deputy director and chief curator at The Museum of The City of New York) and Preface by Luc Sante (author, Guggenheim Fellow, and teacher at Bard College).

Most appealing to me about this themed collection — and the reason I bought it — are the eight previously unpublished Addams pieces — one of them a color piece, obviously intended as a New Yorker cover, titled “Green City” — it’s dated 1979. While most of the work included was published in The New Yorker, a good number previously appeared only in Addams cartoon collections. A few others (seven, if my counting is correct) appeared via the McClure Syndicate; a couple appeared in The New York Times.

I love that the book includes more than a dozen color plates of New Yorker covers. Addams’ covers are masterpieces of the form. There’s a really nice photo of Addams, taken in his studio as he’s working on a New Yorker cover published October 31, 1983 (it is, of course, included in the book). In the photo, you see a sliding glass door hard by his drawing table. Seen through the glass, out on the lawn, are a couple of Addams’ dogs sniffing around.

The Spill doesn’t rate cartoons, or cartoonists, or books of cartoons, but  occasionally it breaks into a round of applause.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoons

Ellis Rosen on yesterday’s political drama. Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

 

 

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet; A New Yorker State Of Mind: Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of February 3-7, 2020

Liza Donnelly Returns To Oscar’s Red Carpet

Liza Donnelly will be back on Oscar’s Red Carpet tomorrow night for her fifth year of live-drawing.  Five years ago she made Oscar history by being the very first cartoonist to draw while on the Red Carpet. She began posting drawings yesterday, and will continue posting today, leading up to her coverage of tomorrow night’s big shindig. Follow her on Instagram & Twitter: @lizadonnelly

Above: Ms. Donnelly yesterday on the mostly still-covered red carpet.

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Thurber’s First New Yorker Drawing

A Spill fave blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker, takes a close look at the issue of January 31, 1931, which boasts James Thurber’s inaugural New Yorker cartoon appearance. Read it here.

According to Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography (Ohio State University Press, 1968), Thurber’s previous published drawing appeared in his college’s magazine,Ohio State’s Sun-Dial, March 1918.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features during the week

The Daily Cartoon:

Ellis Rosen, Jon Adams, J.A.K., Chris Weyant, Trevor Spaulding

Daily Shouts: Ali Fitzgerald, J.A.K., Olivia de Recat (with Sarah Vollman)

...and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Review Of Interest: Carol Isaacs’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”; Photo: A Cartoonist & A Kitty

Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

Oscar in therapy courtesy of Ellis Rosen who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

Visit his website here.

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Review Of Interest: Carol Isaacs’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”

From Broken Frontier, February 6, 2020, “The Wolf of Baghdad: Memoir Of A Lost Homeland — Carol Isaacs Provides A Haunting Account Of Persecution In Mid-Twentieth Century Iraq”

 Ms. Isaacs is also known as The Surreal McCoy. She began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014 (that first drawing signed “T.S. McCoy”). Visit her website here.

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Photo: Garrett Price & Friend

The arrival in today’s mail of a Garrett Price sketch caused me to go to his one collection, Drawing Room Only. Looking through, I’d forgotten that the photo shown here was on the back flap. I thought what better way to end this wacky week than with a photo of a cartoonist and a kitty.

Here’s Mr. Price’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Garrett Price  Born, 1897, Bucyrus, Kansas. Died, April, 1979, Norwalk, Conn. Collection: Drawing Room Only: A Book of Cartoons (Coward -McCann, 1946). New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.