Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 11-15, 2019; About The Upcoming Animated Addams Family; Early Cover Release; Video: Chast At The Strand

The Daily was three-fifths Trump this week.  The contributors:  Brooke Bourgeois, Mary Lawton, Ellis Rosen, Emily Flake, and Jason Chatfield/Scott Dooley.

And the New Yorker cartoonists contributing to the Daily Shouts: Jason Adam Katzenstein/Ellie Black, and Roz Chast.

You can see all of the above and more here.  

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About The Upcoming Animated Addams Family

From Paste, March 15, 2019, “Everything We know About the New Animated Addams Family Movie So Far”

Below left, some of the television cast, and on the right, an Addams drawing of the family.

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Early Cover Release

As happens when the New Yorker is particularly keen on a newsy cover, they let us see it well before the usual Monday morning publication.  And so it is with Mark Ulriksen’s piece above.  Read about it here.

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Chast At The Strand…and in the Newspaper

Mike Lynch has posted a link to a video of the recent Strand bookstore appearance by Roz Chast.  Go here to Mike’s site for the actual video link.

Even more Chast: this piece from The New York Times, March 14, 2019,  “Roz Chast and Patricia Marx Mine the Motherlode”

Fave Photo Of The Day: Lee Lorenz At The Bruce Museum; The Tilley Watch Online: Newyorker.com Daily Cartoons & Shouts, February 17-23, 2019; Liza Donnelly Live-Draws From The Oscars Red Carpet Tomorrow

Courtesy of the Bruce Museum, this photo of the New Yorker‘s former art/cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz taken on a recent visit to the Bruce’s current exhibit, Masterpieces From The Museum Of Cartoon Art.

Here’s Mr. Lorenz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Lee Lorenz Born 1932, Hackensack, New Jersey. Mr. Lorenz was the art editor of The New Yorker from 1973 to 1993 and its cartoon editor until 1997. During his tenure, a new wave of New Yorker cartoonists began appearing in the magazine — cartoonists who no longer depended on idea men. The group included, among others, Jack Ziegler, Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, Peter Steiner, Liza Donnelly, Leo Cullum, Tom Cheney, Gahan Wilson, Richard Cline, Michael Crawford, Danny Shanahan, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Victoria Roberts, and Arnie Levin.

Cartoon collections: Here It Comes (Bobbs-Merrrill Co., Inc. 1968) ; Now Look What You’ve Done! (Pantheon, 1977) ; The Golden Age of Trash ( Chronicle Books, 1987); The Essential series, all published by Workman: : Booth (pub: 1998), Barsotti ( pub: 1998), Ziegler (pub: 2001), The Art of The New Yorker 1925 -1995, (Knopf, 1995), The World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998). New Yorker work: 1958 –.

Mr. Lorenz’s 1977 cartoon collection

A Daily week nearly devoid of politics. The Daily cartoonists: Ellie Black, Karl Stevens, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, and Julia Suits.

The Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists: Ali Fitzgerald, Liana Finck, Sophia Warren, Tom Chitty, and Maggie Larson.

You can see all of the above, and more here.

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Donnelly At The Oscars

Four years ago Liza Donnelly made history as the first cartoonist to live-draw from the Oscars Red Carpet. She’s been in LaLa Land this past week drawing events leading up to tomorrow’s big day when she’ll once again live-draw from the Red Carpet. Follow her work on @Lizadonnelly .

Ms. Donnelly’s first New Yorker cartoon appeared in 1982. She is the author of eighteen books, including Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005).

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of February 11, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoon

The Cover: This week’s New Yorker cover is by Pascal Campion, his second cover for the magazine — his second moody metropolis scene. Read about it here. I wonder if we’ll see a moody mid-western, western, northeastern or southern scenario anytime soon.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Several nice surprises this week. The first was running into Sam Gross’s lead-in cartoon (his work has been appearing in the magazine for forty-nine years). There are certain cartoonists whose style alone gets the laugh meter buzzing. Mr. Gross is one of those cartoonists. The other surprise: R.O. Blechman’s “spot” drawings. Mr. Blechman’s wonderful drawings and covers have appeared in the magazine for forty-five years.

A third nice thing to see in this issue: the number of cartoons. Bumped up from the usual dozen or so to a healthy eighteen. They just keep on a-comin as you flip through the magazine (as do the illustrations).

If I have one little dark cloud to drag over this sunny moment it’s another plea for some of the work to be run larger (true, some cartoons run large, should be smaller). A number in this issue are, to my eyes, sized just right (a few for instances: Tom Cheney’s on page 54, and Jon Adams on page 52). Perfectly sized is Seth Fleishman’s terrific drawing on page 39. But others seem wedged into their corners; Roz Chast’s intricate Candy Land For Adults (page 32) and David Sipress’s off the beaten track restaurant (page 25) would benefit from more space. Really all I’m campaigning for is a graphic invitation for readers to fully appreciate the work. The work of the late George Price is a good example of how a cartoonist’s world can take us in for some detached momentary fun-time. Mr. Price’s drawings were usually allowed a lot of breathing room on the page. One paused to inspect the work, to enjoy all the “stuff” Price gave us. Imagine one of his drawings run in a little box on the corner of a page.

A few favorite drawings, or elements of drawings in this issue: Joe Dator’s monkey (page 40); Paul Noth’s drawing (page 60) — a great addition to the New Yorker‘s doctor canon; P.C. Vey’s theater drawing; Maddie Dai’s drawing of a sculptor and friend, as well as the caption; Frank Cotham’s perfect caption for his drawing (page 36). All fine, inspiring moments.

Next-to-Lastly, a mention of the newest cartoonist on the block: Ellie Black, the third newbie this year and the twenty-seventh new cartoonist brought in since Emma Allen became the magazine’s cartoon editor in May of 2017. A good debut, with a welcome unexpected play on the well-worn hands touching moment we’ve seen in movies and books.

And lastly, let us not forget the great work of Rea Irvin, especially his mothballed masthead design. Here it is:

Speaking of Mr. Irvin, I spoke too soon last week about the New Yorker‘s anniversary issue appearing this week. Had I bothered to consult the fine print publishing info found near the end of each issue I would’ve seen that next week’s magazine (a double issue: February 18 & 25) is the 94th anniversary issue.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, a post-Super Bowl tie-in, is by Farley Katz, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Link to his website here.