The Weekend Spill: Unboxing A Box Of Steinbergs & Steigs; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of March 2-6, 2020; James Stevenson Documentary At Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest; More Spills…

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So often when I go on a hunt for something in the Spill‘s archives I come upon some other thing that takes me off onto another track. Today for instance, while poking around piles of boxes, I came across the box you see above.  Many years ago I filled the box with issues of The New Yorker bearing  Steinberg covers and Steig covers — then I stuck a label on the box and put the box on a shelf where it remained unopened for at least a decade, if not more. Today I opened the box and placed most of the issues out on a table.

Gems all! Maybe a dozen more issues didn’t make it into the photograph, but you get the idea. What I find interesting about this group is that I cannot remember why I bothered to gather these particular issues.

After photographing them, I put them all back in their beat-up box. I have plans to incorporate them into the loose issue New Yorker collection — but not today; maybe in 2030, when I come across the box again.

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A listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features this past week

The Daily Cartoon: Christopher Weyant, David Sipress, Ellis Rosen, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon.

Daily Shouts: Ward Sutton.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

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Sally Williams fab 2019 documentary Stevenson Lost & Found will be shown March 29th at The Martha’s Vineyard Film Fest. Info here.  Lucky you if you’re on the island and able to attend.

Mr. Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other New Yorker artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson was a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He was a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, published in 2013, is essential reading.  Sally Williams’ 2019 documentary film, Stevenson Lost & Found is essential viewing.

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…Just a few days ago while browsing through a bound volume of New Yorkers I came across a drawing by Ihrie Means (in the issue of May 14, 2007). Ms. Means name has now been added to the Spill‘s A-Z. My apologies for not adding her sooner.

…Work by Liz Montague, a newer addition to the New Yorker’s stable (March, 2019), is in (A Mini) Zine Fest, later this month.  Details here.

…The late great Syd Hoff‘s name came up in yesterday’s New York Times crossword puzzle: the clue (if that’s what it’s called — I’m not a crossword puzzler) was Cartoonist Hoff. 

Here’s Syd Hoff’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Syd Hoff ( Photo source: Esquire Cartoon album, 1957) Born 1912, New York City, died May 12, 2004, Miami Beach, Florida. New Yorker work: 1931 – 1975. Visit the Syd Hoff website here.

 

Cover Revealed! Harry Bliss & Steve Martin’s “A Wealth Of Pigeons”; Searle’s 100th Celebrated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…And Yesterday’s)

And now there’s a cover for the Harry Bliss & Steve Martin collaborative cartoon collection. We’ll see it on sale November 17th (Celadon Books). The Spill first ran a piece about their New Yorker duo efforts back in March of 2019.

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Searle’s 100th Celebrated

Today marks the 100th birthday of the late great Ronald Searle, New Yorker cartoonist & cover artist. A Spill fave blog, Attempted Bloggery has been celebrating for weeks; see today’s post here. Also visit Perpetua, the Searle “tribute” blog.

Mr. Searle’s Spill A-Z entry:

Ronald Searle  Born, Cambridge, England March 3, 1920. Died, December 30, 2011, Draguignan, France. Steven Heller, who wrote Searle’s obit for The New York Times (Jan 4, 2012) said Searle’s “outlandishly witty illustrations for books, magazine covers, newspaper editorial pages and advertisements helped define postwar graphic humor…”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (…and Yesterday’s)

Elisabeth McNair on Purell & crime.

Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2017. Visit her website here.

…Yesterday’s Daily cartoonist: Ali Solomon on Super Tuesday.

Ms. Solomon began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2018.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 6, 2020

The Cover: A retro cover! When I saw this attractive cover I immediately placed its style and structure in the early 1960s, and thought of a particular artist: the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, Arthur Getz. To illustrate, here’s Mr. Getz’s cover from December 18, 1965 side-by-side with this new one by Pascal Campion.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Some random thoughts on a few of the cartoons in The New Yorker‘s first issue of the 2020s…

There’s a duo effort by Jose Arroyo and Rob Kutner. Mr. Arroyo first began contributing to the magazine in 2008. Mr. Kutner is a comedy writer.

Really like Suerynn Lee’s breadcrumbs-on-a-trail drawing (it’s on page 28) — graphically appealing with a strong caption. Of the breadcrumbs-on-a-trail themed New Yorker cartoons over the years, here’s a favorite from the great Arnie Levin, published May 22, 2000.

Zach Kanin’s mounted python (on p. 36) is a hoot (or a “ssssssss”).  Mr. Kanin’s drawings always seem (to me) to contain some kind of Charles Addamsy-ish dna, which is a very good thing.

Can’t see a dog at a computer cartoon, such as Elisabeth’s McNair’s (p. 34) without thinking of  Peter Steiner‘s celebrated New Yorker drawing published July 5, 1993:  “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” It remains the most republished New Yorker drawing in modern history.

Joe Dator’s procrastinating writer cartoon (p. 39) is fun. The length of the caption — and the time it takes to read it —  becomes another element of delay.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Last Monday, in this space, I held out the faint hope we might see Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead return to kick off the new year and decade. No dice. The redraw — plopped-in in the Spring of 2017 — is back after Ed Steed’s fun one-off in last week’s “Cartoon Takeover” issue.  Read more about the masthead here, and, as always (until something changes for the better… or worse!), here’s Mr. Irvin’s classic (sadly moth-balled) masthead…

 

Weekend Spill: 64 Works By Steinberg Go To Long Island Museum; The Tilley Watch Online; Meet The Artist (1943): Alan Dunn; Liza Donnelly Speaks on Drawing For Change; Upcoming Swann Auction Loaded With New Yorker Art

64 Steinberg Works To Long Island Museum

From ArtNews, November 15, 2019, “Parrish Art Museum Acquires 64 Works By Famed Cartoonist Saul Steinberg” 

Mr. Steinberg’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts, November 11-15, 2019.

The Daily Cartoon: Kim Warp, Emily Flake, Ellis Rosen, Elisabeth McNair, Christopher Weyant.

Daily Shouts: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Liana Finck (another in her Dear Pepper series), Tim Hamilton.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

See all of the above and more here.

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Liza Donnelly Speaks On Drawing For Change

From Elon University, November 15, 2019, “Cartoonist Liza Donnelly offers look at using visual humor to affect change” — a piece on Ms. Donnelly’s recent talk at the university.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982. Visit her website here.

 

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Meet The Artist (1943): Alan Dunn

One of a number of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the catalog Meet The Artist, published in 1943 by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum.

Alan Dunn’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Alan Dunn Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. New Yorker work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

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Upcoming Swann Auction Abounds With New Yorker Art

The December 10th Swann Illustration Auction catalog is now available online and, as usual, there is a New Yorker section loaded with original pieces.  This particular offering includes a large number of contemporary contributors as well as work by such Golden Age luminaries as Peter Arno, Charles Saxon, Charles Addams, and Steinberg.

See it all here.

Happy bidding!

An Upside Down New Yorker Cover And More From A New Yorker State Of Mind; Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

Here’s a fun post from A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine. The unusual cover art* is by the great Rea Irvin.

Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  (Self portrait above right from Meet the Artist) Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

*Mr. Irvin’s upside down cover was a first for the magazine. The next upside down cover appeared April 12, 1947. It was also by Mr. Irvin. There wasn’t another upside down cover until the anniversary cover of February 11, 2008 (Mr. Irvin co-credited with Seth, who incorporated Democratic candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton with Irvin’s Eustace Tilley trappings).

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

The office cold by Elisabeth McNair, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.