An Upside Down New Yorker Cover And More From A New Yorker State Of Mind; Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

Here’s a fun post from A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker Magazine. The unusual cover art* is by the great Rea Irvin.

Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  (Self portrait above right from Meet the Artist) Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

*Mr. Irvin’s upside down cover was a first for the magazine. The next upside down cover appeared April 12, 1947. It was also by Mr. Irvin. There wasn’t another upside down cover until the anniversary cover of February 11, 2008 (Mr. Irvin co-credited with Seth, who incorporated Democratic candidates Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton with Irvin’s Eustace Tilley trappings).

 

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist

The office cold by Elisabeth McNair, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2018. Visit her website here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of September 9, 2019

The Cover:

It’s the Style Issue this week….thus the bountiful polka dots on Malika Favre’s eighth cover for the magazine. A Q&A with the artist here. If you link to the Q&A you’ll see the polka dot dress swirl.

I can’t see that many polka dots (and red) on the cover without thinking of Peter Arno’s March 23, 1935 New Yorker cover. It was also used as the cover for The Seventh New Yorker Album.

The dalmatians cover is perhaps overly familiar to me because it’s the front endpaper of my biography of Arno. Hey, what can I say? I like dogs…and Arno.

 

The Cartoonists and Cartoons

With the appearance of another team effort (third? fourth?) by Pia Guerra and Ian Boothby I think we’re in new territory as far as crediting a writing team goes for single panel cartoons in the magazine. Someone please correct me if there has been another duo credited beyond one or two appearances (Robert Crumb and Aline Kominsky-Crumb come to mind, but their work is in a different realm, i.e., their “thing” is not single panel cartoons). The duo of Guerra & Boothby have given us a slightly different take on the usual cartoonist’s representation of Noah’s Ark (the drawing appears on page 78). Instead of the long ramp leading up to the ark, it’s more of a tailgate.  It works well here.

Of note: Elisabeth McNair’s drawing of the tortoise and the hare (p. 72). If you remove the art hanging on the wall, and the door frame, the cartoon could easily be seen as descended from the school of (Charles) Barsotti minimalism. Love the turtle’s expression.

Also of note: Hilary Fitzgerald Cambell’s spooky “campfire” story-time drawing (p.49). At first glance I thought the scene was outdoors, but then saw the light sockets in the background with a charging electronic device (a phone?) connected to one of them. That it plays a trick on the eyes — intended or not — is pleasing, as is the drawing itself.

Further of note: Ed Steed adds another drawing to the cartoon canon of mounted something (in this case, someone) or others on the wall (p. 25).

Being the great grandson of bakers, and a fan of baked goods in general, it was a nice surprise  seeing pastries as a focus in Amy Hwang’s drawing (p. 43). Also a nice surprise: seeing Glen Baxter’s drawing (p.68). While a number of cartoonists box in their drawings, Baxter’s boxes somehow seem part of the drawing within, if that makes any sense (is the word “integral” — maybe, maybe not).

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead: Still not home. Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online, April 21-26, 2019; Two Books From Will McPhail; About Zach Kanin

An end of week round-up of the New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the online features, the Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Seth Fleishman, Christopher Weyant, Elisabeth McNair, J.A.K., Avi Steinberg, and Tom Toro.

Daily Shouts: Julia Wertz, Edward Steed, and Ellis Rosen (with Irving Ruan)

To see all of the above, and more, link here.

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Two Books From McPhail

From Publishers Weekly, “Book Deals: Week of April 29, 2019” — news of a two-book deal for Will McPhail. The first, a graphic novel, “In, The Story of Nick” will be out in 2020. The second, Collected Cartoons, will be just that.

Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. Visit his website here.

Further reading: From The Daily Cartoonist: “Tales From the Reuben —  Cranky Digression” 

 — D.D. Degg fact-checks the PW‘.

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About Zach Kanin

From Monsters & Critics, April 27, 2019, Zach Kanin: Who is writer and creator behind I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson on Netflix”

Mr. Kanin began contributing to The New Yorker in 2005. Further reading here.

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Elisabeth McNair; Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad”At Shrewsbury Int’l Cartoon Festival; Today’s Daily Shouts By…Julia Wertz; Cooper Hewitt’s Steinberg’s Spot The Difference; Dick Buchanan’s Perry Barlow File

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Kids, parents, computers…by Elisabeth McNair.  Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.  Visit her website here.

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Surreal McCoy’s “Wolf Of Baghdad” At Shrewsbury Int’l Cartoon Festival

All the info here on the film and the festival.

Ms. McCoy (Carol Isaacs) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts by…Julia Wertz

“Conversations with Ma: Making Wreaths and Having Kids” by Julia Wertz. Ms. Wertz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.   Visit her website here.

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Cooper Hewitt’s Steinberg Spot the Difference

Something fun.  From Cooper Hewitt, April 24, 2019, “Spot the Difference: Steinberg Edition”

Here’s Steinberg’s Spill A-Z entry:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Dick Buchanan’s Perry Barlow File

Another great post from Dick Buchanan via Mike Lynch’s blog.  This time it’s “Perry Barlow 1932- 1961”

(Above: a Barlow from Collier’s, January 21, 1955).

From Mr. Barlow’s Spill A-Z entry:

Perry Barlow ( photo above from barlowgeneology.com) Born 1892, McKinney, Texas. Died, Westport, Connecticut, December 26,1977. New Yorker work: 1926 -1974, with 1,574 drawings and 135 covers. According to Barlow’s obit in The New York Times (Dec. 27, 1977) William Shawn called him “one of the gentlest and most humane of all comic artists…he was also one of our three or four most prolific people.” In the same piece, James Geraghty (The New Yorker’s Art editor from 1939 thru 1973) said “he often tried to interest Mr. Barlow in publishing a book of his drawings ‘but he was halfhearted about it.’” Mr. Barlow’s wife, Dorothy Hope Smith, played a role in his work: she colored-in his covers because her husband was partly color blind.

The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of April 15-19, 2019; Attempted Bloggery’s 2900th Post; A Daily Shouts Correction

A round-up of the week’s online New Yorker cartoonists…

The Daily Cartoonists: P.C. Vey, Barry Blitt (a Bonus Daily), David Sipress, Danny Shanahan, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Elisabeth McNair.

Daily Shouts (by New Yorker cartoonists): Liana Finck, Becky Barnicoat, and a trio effort by Amy Kurzweil, J.A.K., and Ellis Rosen.

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Attempted Bloggery Celebrates Its 2900th Post

Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery celebrates his site’s 2900th post with a look at his signed (and sometimes drawned(?)) copies of Bob Eckstein’s Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons.  See it all here.

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A Correction: In yesterday’s post concerning the Daily Shouts trio of Amy Kurzweil, J.A.K. and Ellis Rosen, I suggested that the trio effort may have been a Shouts first.

There was at least one previous trio: the July 20, 2018 Shouts by Sharon Levy, Olivia de Recat, and Lars Kenseth. My thanks to my colleague, Jeremy Nguyen for bringing this to my attention.