Late Notice: A Launch Party Tonight With Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell Live-Drawing; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of November 18, 2019; Some Thoughts After Seeing The Documentary Film, “Stevenson Lost And Found”

Late Notice: A Launch Party Tonight With Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell Live-Drawing

From the Facebook Invite:

Come celebrate the release of Sarah Dooley’s new book ‘Are You My Uber?’ which is a parody of the P.D. Eastman classic ‘Are You My Mother?’ Listen to comedians Sydnee Washington, Eva Victor, Larry Owens, Pat Regan, Marcia Belsky, Gabe Gonzalez, and Taylor Ortega tell hilarious stories of wild cab experiences while Hilary Campbell, the book’s illustrator, does live drawings.

Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017. Visit her website here.

______________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A leafy Daily from Chris Weyant, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. Visit his website here.

 

______________________________________________________________________________

The Cover: I see leaves. The fifth cover (below right) by Brigit Schossow.  Read a Q&A with her here.

There’ve been a lot, a whole lot, of leafy New Yorker covers, but this current one by Ms. Schossow  brought to mind (courtesy of a helpful New Yorker colleague) the beauty below left by the magazine’s former art & cartoon editor, Lee Lorenz.

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A scattering of thoughts about just a few of the cartoons in this issue:

P.C. Vey’s bear and couple in the woods (on page 33) made my day.

Something totally unexpected cartoon-wise is usually always good, and so it was coming upon a Jack Ziegler cartoon. Especially nice that the drawing is set in one of his favorite cartoon scenarios: a bar.

A fun Pete Mueller drawing (p.27).  Two Mueller drawings in two issues. Yay!

Ellis Rosen’s friend’s shower (p.56) is different. Like the choices of warm/cold and cold/warm.

Needed a ten second Googled refresher course with Liana Finck’s drawing (p. 60).  Not so much what her drawing means, but the meme’s origin (just curious, y’know).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Am hoping to open the issue one day and see Mr. Irvin’s iconic design has returned. No dice this week. For now, there’s that re-draw. Read about the classic Irvin Talk masthead here.

Here’s the real deal:

___________________________________________________________________________

Some Thoughts After Seeing The James Stevenson Documentary Film, Stevenson Lost And Found

A few random thoughts after attending last night’s premiere of Sally Williams’ fab documentary film, Stevenson Lost And Found.  There are are so many moments in the film — too many to go into here — that cartoonists and people who love New Yorker cartoons will treasure.

One instance I found particularly fascinating: the animated sequence showing what might go through cartoonists brains as they sit down and begin the day’s work. We’re shown a series of cartoons covering a wide variety of subject matter. It is, for this cartoonist, a relatable experience, as the mind careens through unlimited places every morning.

Another instance: in some eye-popping sequences we’re shown images of Mr. Stevenson’s children’s books lined-up, as well as Mr. Stevenson’s New Yorker  black scrap books (shown above) kept in the magazine’s library. These books contain every single signed New Yorker contribution by Stevenson, whether it’s his writing or drawing (including covers of course).*  Most of The New Yorker’s nearly 650 cartoonists (from 1925- present) have not had their work collected in one scrap book, let alone five. **

At the screening, I was lucky enough to be seated next to the legendary artist, Edward Sorel. During one of the sequences in the film where we are grasping the enormous amount of work Stevenson did (both published and unpublished) Mr. Sorel leaned over and said to me, “Do you feel as much like an underachiever as I do?”

In a perfect cartoon world, there’d be films such as Lost And Found for a number of the magazine’s artists. It’s heartening that there is already a Thurber film out there, and an Addams documentary in the works, as well as a film about George Booth.  But how about a Steinberg documentary, and one about Steig***?  I can dream, can’t I.  For now, we are quite fortunate to have this gem on Stevenson showing on the big screen. Go see.

__________________________________

* I say “signed” because The New Yorker  did not and does not scrap book cartoon ideas handled by other artists. Mr. Stevenson, early in his New Yorker career, wrote a large number of captions for some of the magazine’s artists (read about his “secret job” here).

**Artists (and writers) without an enormous amount of work are scrap booked in alphabetically  cataloged books, along with other contributors.

***A short video accompanied the Steig exhibit that ran at The Norman Rockwell exhibit.

There is a 20 minute film about Edward Sorel available here.

A 40 minute Eldon Dedini film here, 

And a short film about C.E.M. (Charles E. Martin) here.

 

 

When One Cartoon Is (Very) Much Like Another’s; The Latest Blitt Kvetchbook; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

When One Cartoon Is (Very) Much Like Another’s

From The Boston Globe, September 5, 2019, “Did a biotech exec crib a New Yorker cartoon?”— this piece about a cartoon recently published that closely resembles one by the late great Eldon Dedini published in The New Yorker  November 17, 1986.

Here’s Eldon Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Photo source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. NYer work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

 

______________________________________________________________________

The Latest Blitt Kvetchbook

From Mr. Blitt: Trump’s revised weather map.

Mr. Blitt has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2006.

Visit his website here.

________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

And here’s Tim Hamilton’s take on Trump’s weather map.

Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.  Visit his website here.

 

Of Interest: Early Dedini!; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Mary Lawton

My thanks to Scott Burns for sending along this wonderful piece by Eldon Dedini, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1950. Mr. Dedini also had a long association with Playboy.

Below: from the Dedini exhibit at the Billy Rose Cartoon Library & Museum

Mr. Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z : Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died January 12, 2006, Carmel, California. New Yorker work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery (Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

____________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily Cartoon is by Mary Lawton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of June 18, 1984

As mentioned here last week, it’s double issue time again. We’re halfway though it now ; only a week til the new issue (dated June 18, 2018) appears online early Monday morning. Just for fun I thought I’d go back to another June 18th issue — the one from 1984. 

Here’s the cover, by Susan Davis, who contributed fifteen covers to the magazine from 1983 – 1992.

 

And here are the cartoonists in that issue:

A number of New Yorker cartoon gods in that lineup. And, as you might expect, some cartoonists  contributing to the magazine then who still contribute now. On the downside, a number of colleagues who’ve passed on: George Price, James Stevenson, William Steig, Stan Hunt, J. B. Handelsman, Steinberg, Bernie Schoenbaum, Frank Modell, Barney Tobey, Ed Arno, Mischa Richter, Ed Fisher, Eldon Dedini, and Robert Weber.

A quick tour through the issue: Ed Frascino has a very funny cartoon name-checking Indiana Jones; Lee Lorenz ( the art editor at the time) puts the word “glitz” to excellent use; a half page George Price cartoon centered on the Year of the Rat; a beautiful full page Saxon drawing about the Museum of Modern Art; a four part Stevenson spread across two pages. He animates television antenna; a titled Steig: “Eastbound Traffic.” Great drawing!;  Stan Hunt’s drawing is one of those cartoons that could’ve run anytime in the previous thirty years (previous to 1984, that is) — a boiler plate kind of cartoon; “Bud” Handelsman gives us a heaven-based piece; a Roz Chast drawing split into four boxes. It could’ve run this year; an Ed Koren drawing that just is so like butter — drawing and caption;  Steinberg provides an illustration for a Profile piece by E.J. Kahn, Jr.; opposite Steinberg is a Bernie Schoenbaum cocktail party drawing — a scenario employed by nearly every cartoonist back then; a Frank Modell drawing with his signature people — love his grumpy husband; an Arnie Levin caterpillar/butterfly drawing — that that loose Levin line is so great; a Barney Tobey drawing set in another favorite situation: the boardroom; a great Warren Miller drawing:

 Following Mr. Miller’s cartoon is an Ed Arno drawing — that fine controlled line of his! Immediately identifiable; a Mischa Richter dog at a desk drawing; Ed Fisher gives us a weather bureau drawing with lots of fun detail; Eldon Dedini’s cartoon of two guys at a bar with a caption that could run today:Everything’s a trap if you’re not careful.”;  next up, a cartoon that made me laugh out loud, by the great cartoonist, Robert Weber:

Next, a beautiful Sempe drawing (is there any other kind?); and last, a Sidney Harris restaurant drawing. Mr. Harris’s style is his and his alone: an angular line that appears to almost spin out of control, but never does.

So, there it is. A cartoon feast in mid-June, thirty-four years ago. 

 

     

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini; The Monday Tilley Watch

Photo of Note: Eldon Dedini

Out of the blue, the Monterey Herald posted this fine photo of the late Eldon Dedini under the headline, “Looking Back, Portrait of a Cartoonist”

Here’s Mr. Dedini’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Eldon Dedini ( Pictured above. Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born 1921, King City, Calif. Died Jan.12, 2006, Carmel, Calif. New Yorker work: 1950 – 2003. Collection: The Dedini Gallery ( Holt, Rhinehart and Winston, 1961)

And a real treat, mentioned here a long time back: there’s a multi-panel documentary of Mr. Dedini available onYouTubePart 1 here

_____________________________________________________________________

The Monday Tilley Watch

The issue of May 14, 2018, The “Innovators Issue”…

Record keeping: here’re the cartoonists in the issue (Liana Finck’s name isn’t below but she is listed on the Table of Contents for a Sketchbook piece titled “Life and Work”).

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk Of The Town masthead (below) is still in storage.  As the president might say: Sad!

And sorry to bring this up again, but this business of switching from the Irvin typeface on bylines (see below: “By Tad Friend”) strikes me as tweaking something that does not need tweaking. In fact, some newly incorporated design elements need to be un-tweaked. Would you tweak the top of the Empire State Building because you could? I hope not.

 

Below is a heading plucked from the Dec. 3, 2012 issue.  Notice Calvin Trillin’s name set in Irvin type. Now look back up at the byline for Superior Intelligence.  No question which is the superior typeface. 

Ok, back to cartoons, briefly.  If you want a close look at each cartoon in the issue please visit the Cartoon Companion.  They usually post their rated takes for the latest issue at the end of the week. The CC and the Spill are not affiliated, and in fact often disagree on what’s a great cartoon and what’s a dud.  I’ll return to looking closely at cartoons in this space every so often.