New New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt.2: Edward Steed

And here’s part two of Ink Spill‘s look at some of the newest New Yorker cartoon contributors. If you saw the piece about Liana Finck the other day you’ll remember I’ve asked a trio of fresh faces to tell us a little about themselves and how it was they ended up at The New Yorker. Today we hear from  Edward Steed, who hails from England (joining a stellar cast of our colleagues from across the Atlantic, including Alfred Leete*, who was in the very first issue of The New Yorker).

Mr. Steed’s first New Yorker appearance was in the issue dated March 4, 2013 (an example of his work is below. The cartoon appeared in The New Yorker September 16, 2013).  Mr. Steed has graciously provided Ink Spill with a self portrait.

The floor is now all his:

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I discovered New Yorker cartoons recently, just a couple of years ago. I saw them online and decided I would like to do that too. I hadn’t been interested in cartoons since I’d outgrown the stuff I looked at when I was young, but these were clearly different. I started writing down ideas straightaway.

When I had a bunch of what I thought were good ones I sent them in. Didn’t know about the Tuesday deadline or how the system worked, I just kept sending as many as I could come up with. I hadn’t really drawn cartoons since I was a child. I had no style. So I hoped to impress with quantity. I did that for a few months and heard nothing. Eventually, Bob Mankoff phoned and said he wanted to buy a few of them.

After that, I quit my job and went to New York (I’m from England). I bought the New Yorker magazine for the first time at the airport and read it on the plane, I liked it.
Went to the Tuesday meeting and met Bob and some of the other cartoonists. Everyone was great, very kind and welcoming. Karen Sneider took me to an art shop and explained what kinds of pens cartoonists are supposed to use. Sam Gross showed me round the cartoon section of the Strand bookshop.

& I’ve been drawing cartoons for the magazine fairly regularly since then.

Lead into gold cartoon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And…

See Edward Steed’s New Yorker work here on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

*Additional reading: here’s Alfred Leete‘s entry on Ink Spill‘s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z”:

 

Alfred Leete  (photo above)  Born at Thorpe Church, Northamptonshire, England,  August 28, 1882; Died in London,  June 17, 1933. The son of a farmer, Leete had no formal art training. According to his obit in The Times of London, June 6. 1933: “…his work early showed a keen sense of humour and a bold technique, and was welcomed by the principal illustrated weekly papers and magazines.”    NYer work: appeared in the very first issue of The New Yorker, February 21, 1925. Mr. Leete is uncredited in The New Yorker’s database (listed only as “unidentified”).  As of February 27, 2013, he’s been identified (with the assistance of colleagues, Rick Marschall, Mike Lynch  and Brian Moore). A website bio

 

The New Yorker’s 89th Anniversary Issue

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A very happy 89th  birthday to The New Yorker.   While there’s no classic Eustace Tilley cover this year (the last time we saw Tilley as Rea Irvin* intended was in 2011, we do have, according to the Art Editor, Francoise Mouly, “the first published Tilley painted on an iPhone”; inside the magazine, not including the drawings on the Caption Contest page, are sixteen cartoons by fifteen cartoonists (Joe Dator‘s work appears twice). Two of the drawings contain some color (a cartoon by Ben Schwartz & one by Edward Steed).  Color cartoons were once so unusual in the magazine that when they appeared in The New Yorker‘s 64th anniversary issue in 1989, N.R. Kleinfield wrote a piece about it for The New York Times (“Inside New Yorker, a Splash of Color”). The color appeared in a four page spread by William Steig.

 

 

*Below: Rea Irvin’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

Rea Irvin  (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925.  He was the magazine’s  first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

Below: the first issue of The New Yorker, February 21, 1925.  Cover by Rea Irvin.

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