The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 6, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: A heart-strings reflection of the issue’s Health Issue theme (but it’s tempting to believe we’d see a cover along these lines even if it wasn’t the Health Issue).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An umbrella observation from the get-go:  the abundance of color pieces (one by Roz Chast, one by Emily Flake, and one by Liana Finck) in this issue at times kind’ve almost sorta made it feel as if I was paging through a Cartoon Issue. However, unlike the special pieces found in Cartoon Issues of yore, all three of these new pieces are distinctly linked to one subject (can you guess what it might be?).

There are a number of cartoons in this issue that got my attention, beginning with Barbara Smaller’s (p.26) — my favorite Smaller drawing thus far this year. Also eye-catching: Justin Sheen’s castle & moat drawing; Brendan Loper’s getting away from it all cartoon, and Ed Steed’s survivor. All four enjoy a sharply written caption.

A number of drawings (beyond the color pieces mentioned above)  are either directly related to, or can be seen as related to the coronavirus, foremost being Joe Dator’s terrif drawing (p.69), P.C. Vey’s (p.31), and Mr. Loper’s cartoon on page 39. Tom Chitty’s friendly city drawing (p.57), as well as John O’Brien’s drawing (on page 72) could possibly be read as corona-related cartoons. The folks in Mr. O’Brien’s supermarket all seem to be spaced at least six feet apart, but, as with most all of Mr. O’Brien’s drawings, it’s an evergreen.

The remaining four drawings: Sofia Warren’s, Amy Hwang’s, Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s, and an effort from the Bliss/Martin duo, are comic relief unrelated to the health crisis.

Paperwork: the aforementioned Justin Sheen is new to the New Yorker cartoonist fold. He’s the 4th new cartoonist of 2020, and the 57th new cartoonist brought into The New Yorker since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Read about Rea Irvin’s mothballed iconic Talk masthead (above) here.

And This:

Just noticed that The New Yorker‘s Facebook New Yorker Cartoons page received a make-over. The new look is shown below — new (old) typography, and a (recycled) Rea Irvin inspired banana peel-inspecting Tilley icon replacing Christoph Niemann’s guy at a table icon. Mr. Niemann’s icon showed up in the Spring of 2017, and replaced an existing icon — a drawing by Jack Ziegler.  It puzzled me at the time (and thereafter) that work by a non-New Yorker cartoonist (Mr. Niemann) was chosen to replace an icon drawn by an iconic New Yorker cartoonist.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Kendra Allenby on the newest normal.

Ms. Allenby began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Avi Steinberg gives us “Things That Used To Be Annoying But Are Now A Comfort” — Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of October 28, 2019

The Cover: Trick or treaters in the woods courtesy of Liniers. To me, the creatures appearing in this cover seem to be above-sea-level up-in-the-trees relatives of Ed Steed’s August 26th cover’s creatures. I’m reminded of the fun fans had years ago by hunting for The Beatles faces on the cover of The Rolling Stones album, Their Satanic Majesties Request.

Details from each below, with Mr. Steed’s fabulous creatures on the left and Mr. Linier’s on the right:

                                          The Cartoonists And Cartoons

A number of cartoons to mention this time around beginning with David Sipress’s alien being at the eye doctor’s office (the drawing is on page 29). It’s a clean, clear drawing with an excellent caption. The second I saw it it became my all-time favorite Sipress cartoon (applause, applause)…

…The same applause goes to Ed Steed’s dog at a typewriter (p.56). It’s a captionless drawing that excels because of words, or more specifically one word repeated twenty-two times.  As a bonus,  the drawing has been placed beautifully on the page. It too has risen in status to at least my co-all-time favorite in the Steed canon. Great drawing…

…Roz Chast’s drawing (p. 61) immediately brought to mind this hilarious scene from Jerry Lewis’s 1985 movie “Cracking Up” — Zane Busby is the waitress…

…I wonder how many New Yorker readers will be Googling “Gowanus” after looking at Paul Karasik’s drawing (p.28).  The same cartoon happily led me to thinking about this scene from Monty Python’s “Holy Grail”…

…Really enjoyed Lars Kenseth’s good humored and practical dad reassuring his son (p. 34)…

…Frank Cotham’s drawing (p.66) is another which has instantly become a favorite. It reminds me somehow of Charles Saxon’s best work (which is to say, a large percentage of Saxon’s seven hundred and twenty-five New Yorker drawings). Love the mood of the drawing plus its triumphal caption.  Applause Applause…

…Also much fun is Barbara Smaller’s  city dwellers politically flavored Halloween cartoon (p.17). Ms. Smaller sets a fab scene with details galore: the port-hole elevator door window, the number of locks on the apartment door, the taped-up paper pumpkin on the door…and let’s not forget the dandy caption.

The Rea Irvin Talk Of The Town Masthead Watch

The above heading by the great New Yorker artist Rea Irvin sat atop the New Yorker‘s Talk Of The Town for ninety-two years until being removed and replaced by a redrawn(!) version in the Spring of 2017. Here’s hoping the powers that be (or power that be) reverses the situation. Read more here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of August 26, 2019

The Cover: Way to go, Ed Steed! Mr. Steed’s debut New Yorker cover is a gem.  See the cover and read this short interview about it with Mr. Steed.

It’s always a thrill, and always a reason to cheer when a New Yorker cartoonist’s work appears on the cover. Our presence there took a major hit once the singular title of art editor (last enjoyed by Lee Lorenz) was split in two back in the Tina Brown era. One job became two jobs: a cartoon editor for the cartoons, and an art editor for the covers. For the better part of the magazine’s history, the cartoonists were in the majority as cover contributors (over 60%). That dropped to a single digit percentage in the years since the cover editor’s position was created. Mr. Steed’s breakthrough is encouraging.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

A Spill round of applause for several cartoons in the issue that caught my eye: Tim Hamilton’s lion at a party (p.65) is a stand out. Perhaps I’m a sucker for drawings depicting a person held in clenched jaws.  I’m also quite fond of P.C. Vey’s worked-his-way-up-the-ladder chef in a cubicle (p.63). Mr. Vey has given us a very good drawing. Lila Ash’s trapeze artists (p.79) are also a lot of fun; the drawing clicks perfectly with a caption that heavily depends — even more so than usual in this case — on timing.

The over-all cartoon picture for the issue: Just ten cartoons amid a multitude of illustrations (four of the illustrations are full page). I wonder if my colleagues ever submit cartoons as intended full page drawings. Something to ask next time we gather en masse.

Breathing room around the cartoons is good this issue. Frank Cotham’s drawing (p.52) could’ve used a bit more space so we can appreciate and dive into all that’s going on in his court room. Perhaps, as is sometimes the case, that’s not an issue in the print issue.

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead:  It’s been twenty-seven months since it was abandoned in favor of a (gasp!) redraw. Read about it here.

Here’s the real thing:

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online, April 21-26, 2019; Two Books From Will McPhail; About Zach Kanin

An end of week round-up of the New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the online features, the Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Seth Fleishman, Christopher Weyant, Elisabeth McNair, J.A.K., Avi Steinberg, and Tom Toro.

Daily Shouts: Julia Wertz, Edward Steed, and Ellis Rosen (with Irving Ruan)

To see all of the above, and more, link here.

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Two Books From McPhail

From Publishers Weekly, “Book Deals: Week of April 29, 2019” — news of a two-book deal for Will McPhail. The first, a graphic novel, “In, The Story of Nick” will be out in 2020. The second, Collected Cartoons, will be just that.

Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014. Visit his website here.

Further reading: From The Daily Cartoonist: “Tales From the Reuben —  Cranky Digression” 

 — D.D. Degg fact-checks the PW‘.

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About Zach Kanin

From Monsters & Critics, April 27, 2019, Zach Kanin: Who is writer and creator behind I Think You Should Leave with Tim Robinson on Netflix”

Mr. Kanin began contributing to The New Yorker in 2005. Further reading here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 29, 2019; Seven Earth Day Animations By Liza Donnelly For CBS This Morning; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Tom Toro; Reminder! Tomorrow At Word Bookstore, A Trio Of New Yorker Cartoonists; Lost Gems By Charles Addams, Barbara Shermund, William Steig, And Syd Hoff From Dick Buchanan

The Cover: As mentioned here days back, Bob Staake’s cover was (very) early released. You can read what Mr. Staake has to say about it here

The Cartoonists:

This is Darrin Bell’s first appearance in the magazine since his Pulitzer win was announced.

 The cartoon by Miriam Katin marks her debut appearance in the magazine.  She is the 9th new cartoonist brought into the stable this year, and the 34th new cartoonist brought in since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

The Cartoons:

Three cartoons especially stood out this week.

  Joe Dator‘s world continues to fascinate. His floating mammals drawing (p.34) is about as good as it gets. The drawing itself is great, as is the caption. If the Cartoon Companion guys were still in the business of rating cartoons, this would certainly be awarded their blue ribbon. 

Another contender is Ed Steed‘s trapeze artists with baby (p.28). For me, it’s the best baby-centric New Yorker drawing since Zach Kanin’s wonderful drawing of July 7, 2008, “I can feel the baby kicking.”

Charlie Hankin‘s cartoon (on p.64):  like desert island drawings, the cartoon scenario of a person seated by the fire with their mounted trophies up on the wall has been around in the cartoon universe for a very long time. Mr. Hankin has given us a terrific “If I Had A Hammer” moment.

Finally…

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead has not yet been returned — its replacement, a re-draw, continues to appear.  Read about the unfortunate situation here. Below is the real thing.

Below: Mr. Irvin himself, looking a little frustrated?

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Seven Animations For Earth Day By Liza Donnelly

CBS News This Morning has posted seven Earth Day specific animations by Liza Donnelly (Ms. Donnelly is their resident cartoonist). See the work on Twitter @LizaDonnelly & @CBSThisMorning.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Tom Toro delivers a Games of Throne-ish drawing. Mr. Toro began contributing to The New Yorker  in 2010.  

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A Reminder! Three New Yorker Cartoonists at Word Bookstore Tomorrow

An event celebrating a fun new book with three fun cartoonists. Further info here.

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Dick Buchanan’s Files via Mike Lynch: “New Yorker Luminaries 1933-1942″

Further lost gems from Mr. Buchanan’s files via Mike Lynch’s site include work from Charles Addams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., William Steig, Richard Taylor, Syd Hoff, Richard Decker, and Barbara Shermund.  Above, a Barbara Shermund drawing from Colliers, September 10, 1938. See them all here.