Lee Lorenz in Conversation with Edward Sorel; Kuper Pencilled & Panelled

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Two heavy hitters, Lee Lorenz and Edward Sorel will share a stage on September 26th for an event billed “Drawing Sides: A Timely Conversation on Political Cartoons”   Details here.

 

 

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Peter Kuper joins a very long list of New Yorker artists who’ve told us about their chosen tools of the trade on Jane Mattimoe’s terrif blog, A Case For Pencils. Read it here.

 

And speaking of Mr. Kuper, he’ll be appearing on a panel tonight at the New York Academy of Art. The discussion will center on the history and future of MAD magazine. nyaof-art-mad

 

The Outer Boroughs’ New Yorker Cartoonists: An Ink Spill Map

Joining two previous Ink Spill maps, The New Yorker’s New York, and New Jersey’s New Yorkers, is the Outer Boroughs’ New Yorker Cartoonists. Cartoonists included were born in the boroughs.  I’m fairly certain this is not a complete picture — corrections and suggestions always welcome (for instance: please advise if Staten Island had at least one native born New Yorker cartoonist).

[Click on the map to enlarge it].

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Event of Note: Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer in Conversation, Oct. 20th; More Spills: Al Frueh’s Studio and Paul Noth’s Book News

sorel_feifferCartoon gods Edward Sorel & Jules Feiffer will be in conversation on October 20th at the Parkway Central Library in Philadelphia.  Mark your calendar!  Details here.

Mr. Sorel’s latest book, Mary Astor’s Purple Diary: The Great American Sex Scandal of 1936 is due this October while Mr. Feiffer’s latest, Cousin Joseph, is just out. Both are published by Liveright. 9781631490231_300

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More Spills Icon EditedPaul Noth has signed up for three books with Bloomsbury.  Writing on Facebook about the news, Mr. Noth said: “They’re my favorite thing I’ve ever done.”

And here’s what Publisher’s Weekly had to say:

 

 The illustrated adventure series features Happy Junior, a bearded 10-year-old who wants to be normal but can’t, thanks to his family, including his father, a brilliant inventor whose screwball products are trumpeted in TV infomercials, his five unusual sisters, and his despotic grandmother who has relegated the whole family to a basement corner of her grand estate. The first book in the series, How to Sell Your Family to the Aliens, will be published in winter 2018…

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And from out of left field, this real estate listing for a Greenwich Village townhouse (34 Perry Street) that includes a mention of Al Frueh, who had the first cartoon in the very first issue of The New Yorker.

*New Yorker Minutiae Recollection Award of the year goes to Stephen Nadler, who runs the wonderfully entertaining and informative Attempted Bloggery.  Stephen wrote to me after reading this post and pointed out that this very same studio  was mentioned in that very same inaugural issue under the heading In Our Midst. And here it is:

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From the realtor’s listing:”The fourth floor is exceptional. In 1924, it was transformed into a loft and artist studio by renowned New Yorker cartoonist Mr. Al Frueh with a raised roof and extraordinary large windows and north facing skylight across the entire frontage.”


Al Frueh's studio

 

 

 

Out Today! Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist

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Finally!

My thanks to Karen Green of Columbia University for last night’s wonderful send-off for Arno at Butler Library.  And thanks too to Edward Sorel for co-piloting the program with me.

A big thank you to all who attended, including those from my New Yorker family: Roxie Munro, George Booth, Tom Bloom, Sam Gross, Robert Leighton, Felipe Galindo, David Borchart, Liza Donnelly, Peter Kuper and Bob Eckstein.

From the book’s afterword, where 60 New Yorker cartoonists talk about Arno,  here’s what George Booth had to say:

 Peter Arno’s work stands out and holds up in the test of time. His drawings and words were never timid, or just clever. They stated high quality, joy, confidence, strength, style, humor, idea, life, simplicity. His color was right; black and white became color. His cartoons were researched, with words well applied. The communication was clear and timely. He knew what he was doing. Peter Arno was an artist who gave something of value to the world. A hero.