The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of November 12-16, 2018; Of Interest: Mort Gerberg Anthology and Exhibit In 2019; More Spills: Vinciguerra On “The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons”… Edward Koren’s “In The Wild”

The Daily Cartoon contributing New Yorker cartoonists for the past week: David Sipress, Peter Kuper, Jason Chatfield (with Scott Dooley), and Jason Adam Katzenstein. Not so much a Trumpian week this week.

The New Yorker cartoonist contributing to Daily Shouts: Emily Flake (with Abby Sher). 

To see all the work, link here.

________________________________________________

Out mid-January 2019 from Fantagraphics, Mort Gerberg On The Scene.  The publisher tells us that the book is a “career retrospective of Gerberg’s magazine cartoons, sketchbook drawings, and on-the-scene reportage sketches.”

According to the current issue of the National Cartoonists Society publication The National Cartoon!st [sic] Mr. Gerberg’s art will be on exhibit at The New York Historical Society in 2019. 

I’m trying to find a way to link to the excellent Gerberg interview in the issue. 

Trivia: within the interview a full page Gerberg cartoon from the October 20, 1965 New Yorker is identified as Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon (Mr. Gerberg  talks about the history of the cartoon in question).  In fact, Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon ran in April of that year (the issue of April 10th, ’65). This is it:

Link here to Mr. Gerberg’s website.

___________________________________________

…Thomas Vinciguerra, author of the wonderful Cast of Characters: Wolcott Gibbs, E.B. White, James Thurber, And The Golden Age Of The New Yorker (Norton, 2016) has reviewed the big red trope box, The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons  for The Wall Street Journal. Unfortunately, the WSJ‘s paywall gets in the way of fully reading it.  Here’s a link anyway (in case you subscribe, or wish to).

…And from Seven Days, November 14, 2018, an article on Edward Koren’s just published In The Wild

 

 

Book Of Interest: I Think, Therefore I Draw

Published a couple of weeks ago, I Think, Therefore I Draw: Understanding Philosophy Through Cartoons (Penguin) includes enough New Yorker cartoons (among a number of non-New Yorker cartoons) to mention here. The New Yorker cartoonists represented (in order of their appearance): Paul Noth, John McNamee, Tom Cheney, Danny Shanahan, P.C. Vey, David Sipress, George Booth, Avi Steinberg, Amy Hwang, Leo Cullum, Mort Gerberg, P.S. Mueller, John Klossner, Aaron Bacall, Sam Gross, “Bud” Handelsman, Lee Lorenz, Michael Maslin, Jack Ziegler, Edward Koren, Matt Diffee, Eric Lewis, Edward Frascino, and Charles Barsotti.

The authors have this (in part) to say in their introduction: “Here, then, is a collection of our favorite philosophical cartoons and our annotations about what they teach us about the Big Questions in philosophy.”

You can sample the text by going to the Amazon listing and clicking on the “Look inside” feature.

 

Edward Koren Book Events; An Early Release Of Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Colin Tom Is Pencilled; Live New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers; Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

From UV Index, November 8, 2018, “Ed Koren, the ‘New Yorker’ cartoonist who served as Vermont’s cartoon laureate, releases new book” — this press release mentioning two upcoming events featuring Mr. Koren.

Ed Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Link here to his website.

______________________________________________________________

An Early Release of Next Week’s Cover

As happens every so often, the magazine has early-released its upcoming cover (cover artist: Barry Blitt). You can read about it here. 

_______________________________________________________

Colin Tom Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils’ spotlight falls on Colin Tom. Mr. Tom began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

Go here to read all about Mr. Tom’s  tools of the trade.

______________________________________

Live New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick (above left) returned to NBC’s “Late Night With Seth Meyers” for the seventh installment of “Live New Yorker Cartoons” (this one carried the tag, “Raiders of the Lost Snark”). Cartoons by Liam Walsh, Liana Finck, Jon Adams, Zach Kanin, and Mick Stevens were brought to life.  See it here.

And:  here’s Mr. Remnick’s sit-down chat with Mr. Meyers. It includes some interesting cartoon talk.

_____________________________________________________

Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” focus on all the cartoons in the latest issue of the New Yorker (the one with the row boat on the cover). Read it here.

 

Coming Events Of Interest: Death Panel At The New York Public Library; Eckstein Talks Snowmen; Liza Donnelly Talks Dogs With Carolita Johnson; An Edward Koren Book Event In Vermont

October 31st:  “Death Panels: Comics That Help Us Face End Of Life”  includes work by New Yorker cartoonists Ben Schwartz, Emily Flake and Roz Chast. Info here

______________________________________________________________________

Two Snowman Events with The New Yorker’s Bob Eckstein

Mr. Eckstein, a contributor to The New Yorker since 2007 is the world’s leading snowman expert.  You can catch him at these two locations:

November 7:  Book Culture, Columbus & 72nd St. NYC. 7pm  All the Info here

November 28: New York Public Library, 42nd St & 5th Ave., NYC. 6:30pm Info here.

________________________________________________

Liza Donnelly Talks Dogs With Carolita Johnson

Ms. Donnelly and her New Yorker colleague, Carolita Johnson (far right, above) will be at Books Are Magic, discussing dogs and the just released, Be The Person Your Dog Thinks You Are (illustrated by Ms. Donnelly). November 2. Info here. 

_________________________________________________

Edward Koren at Phoenix Books in Vermont

The one and only Edward Koren will be at Phoenix Books in Burlington Vermont celebrating his latest book, Koren: In The Wild.  November 15th from 7:00pm — 8:30pm Details here

 

 

A Second Look: Steinberg At The New Yorker

In the past week I’ve mentioned two New Yorker cartoon gods, Charles Addams and Edward Koren — here are a few thoughts on another: Saul Steinberg. I admit to not paying enough attention to Joel Smith’s Steinberg At The New Yorker when it came out in 2005. Perhaps, at the time, I was in the early stages of being Steinberged-out.  A traveling exhibit, Illuminations, followed on the heels of this book (I saw, but did not really see the show at the Morgan in Manhattan — it was too crowded; I was jostled every time I paused in front of a piece. I made a second pilgrimage when it traveled to Vassar College, a less crowded venue, far more condusive to examining and enjoying the work (on the back flap of Steinberg At The New Yorker, the author is noted as a curator at Vassar’s Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, where the exhibit was held). 

I left both exhibits feeling the opposite of how I felt seeing Steinberg’s big solo show at the Whitney in 1978.  In 1978 Steinberg, along with a handful of other New Yorker artists, owned the New Yorker cartoon world. I left the Whitney Steinberg exhibit feeling as if I was coming down from the mountaintop.  An inspiring day (followed by an inspiring intersection with the man himself).

Twenty-five years later, leaving the Vassar exhibit, a large fraction of the awe remained; the mathematical designs, the subject matter, his color pencil work; the way he drew colorful feathers on poultry, the way he used color as pulsating rays emanating from the emergency lights on police cars — all still caused a stir of appreciation.  But…seeing the work hanging on the gallery walls I was too aware of perfection, or my perception of Steinberg’s perfection. The perfection had worn me down.  The designs were too good, the work too beautiful, too creative. No particular piece in the exhibit disappointed, yet the show as a whole disappointed.

This afternoon, while standing in front of the Spill‘s cartoon library wall, I spotted Mr. Smith’s book and took it down. Why not give it another spin around the block. I opened to the back where each and every Steinberg New Yorker cover, from 1945- 2004, is laid out — there are nine to a page. The very first, in 1945 was followed nine years later in 1954.  I hadn’t remembered that — or had never processed it. Nine years between covers…hmmm, hard to believe.

Scanning the covers it dawned on me why I became burned out on the man’s art: I was reminded of a spur of the moment decision years ago while I was walking along 5th Avenue in midtown Manhattan: I ducked into Tiffany’s (for the first and possibly last time) to explore the fleet of display cases filled with so many perfect jewels. Looking now at all of these Steinberg covers, encased in a way, I felt much like I felt following my brief tour of Tiffany’s —  I wanted to be back out in our imperfect world.

Going through the rest of the book was a better time. Seeing familiar covers reproduced full page was a treat. This is how to see them, full size, one cover at a time — as originally experienced when they appeared on the magazine. When the covers were doubled up, facing each other across the gutter, I again found the work too rich to enjoy. Oddly enough I don’t have this problem looking at several Addams covers in a row, such as found in The World Of Charles Addams, or a string of covers by various artists such as you find in The New Yorker 1950-1955 Album, or the  essential Complete Covers From The New Yorker: 1925 – 1989. 

Is Steinberg At The New Yorker an essential anthology? Yes, of course.  Besides seeing so many familiar Steinberg drawings, there were many unfamiliar. But again, I preferred a single scoop –seeing a little of the work at one sitting, rather than sitting down with a banana split (sorry about that). I particularly enjoyed Ian Frazier’s Introduction.

As always with every cartoonist mentioned here on the Spill, I encourage looking at the various anthologies that came out during the artist’s lifetime. Here are some favorite Steinberg anthologies, all easily found online.

For further immersion, don’t forget Deirdre Bair’s hefty Saul Steinberg: A Biography: