The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 25, 2020: CBS Sunday Morning’s Mini-Slideshow; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

It’s become (almost) the norm during these strange days, weeks, and months that the online digital edition of The New Yorker is not as yet posted by this time of day (early morning that is). Back in the pre-shutdown days it usually appeared in the wee hours (usually around 3 a.m.). There was even a time before that when it was posted, in a sort of dramatic reveal, at the stroke of midnight.

I’ll post more about the new issue later in the day when I have the online issue in front of me. If possible I like seeing the cartoons as they appear on the magazine’s pages before saying a thing about them. I’ve already seen them this morning as they appear in the slideshow found on this page and, despite what I just said about commenting, have already said something about one of the drawings.

Update: The digital issue was all ready to go this mornin (May 19). A few additions to the Monday Tilley Watch below, as well as some content removed.

The Cover: I had a hunch we’d see a Barry Blitt cover much sooner than later following his Pulitzer…and bingo!

Read the short Q&A with him here about the cover.

The Cartoonists:  I’ve * the two cartoonists who are newbies, Kate Isenberg and Suzy Becker. The two newbies are the seventh and eighth new cartoonists to join the stall this year and the sixtieth and sixty-first to be brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship that began in May of 2017.

  Ellis Rosen, Liana Finck, Zachary Kanin, P.C. Vey, Edward Koren, Victoria Roberts, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Navied Mahdavian, Hartley Lin, Tom Toro, Elisabeth McNair, *Kate Isenberg*, Roz Chast, Sofia Warren, Jared Nangle,*Suzy Becker*

The Cartoons:

Really enjoyed Victoria Robert‘s celebrity drawing and caption, as well as Edward Koren‘s family cliff-climbing outing. Lovely drawings. Also catching my eye: Elisabeth McNair‘s fun take on the famous Magritte pipe (This Is Not A Pipe).  and Jared Nangle‘s Jack-In-The-Box.

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below) is still in storage…but hopefully not forever. Read about it here.

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CBS Sunday Morning’s Mini-Slideshow

CBS Sunday Morning ran a mini slideshow of three coronvirus theme New Yorker cartoons on yesterday’s broadcast. Cartoonists responsible for the three drawings: Roz Chast, Victoria Roberts, and Danny Shanahan.

The show has been attentive to New Yorker cartoonists over the years, with several profile pieces, including this one from 2017 and this one from 2009.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon 

Ali Solomon on a facsimile.

Ms. Solomon has been contributing to The New Yorker since November of 2018. See more of her work here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 20, 2020

A Note To Readers: Due to the times we’re in the digital edition of the magazine appears later in the day than usual. Thus, instead of the usual look through the magazine, I’m working off of the slide show of cartoons on newyorker.com, as well as the cover Q&A found there. If any mistakes are made on my part I’ll correct them once the digital issue is posted.

Update: 1:00pm.  Digital issue posted about an hour ago.

The Cover: Owen Smith gives us a tired worker (the piece is titled — and again, why do we need cover titles? —  “After The Shift”)…four out of the last five covers have been corona virus themed. Read about the cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

I don’t know how others respond to an issue’s cartoons. For me, it’s always at least a two-level response:

1. How each drawing hits me — did a drawing stand out (for better or worse).

2. The feeling from all the drawings combined: was it a strong issue of work, or not.

This new issue feels strong, covering a wide range of territory in cartoonland, from aliens (courtesy of Charlie Hankin) to a PC Satyr (from Edward Koren), from dolphins in a swimming pool (McPhail), to what might be found on the other side of the mountaintop (Colin Tom)… and so much more.

 

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch:

Rea Irvin, the fellow shown here, did so much to shape the look of The New Yorker (okay, I’ll say it — he was instrumental). One of his greatest lasting contributions was adapting Allen Lewis’s typeface; it eventually became known as the Irvin typeface, although these days I hear it   referred to as the New Yorker typeface.  Among Irvin’s many contributions other than art supervisor to Harold Ross (in itself a huge contribution!) was contributing covers, including, of course, the very first one, featuring Eustace Tilley. He also contributed cartoons, and headings for various departments. His design for Talk Of The Town stood in place (with a few adjustments in the magazine’s earliest days) for 92 years, until May of 2017 when his iconic design was mothballed and replaced by a redraw.

Am I wrong to think of Irvin’s typeface, his Tilley, his Talk masthead, and his “catholic” taste in cartoon selection as representing the graphic soul of the magazine?  So many modern changes (or “tweaks” as they were referred to) were test ballooned in recent years and then withdrawn (layout, typography, headings, etc., etc.) —  why not bring back this not insignificant bit of soul.

 

Weekend Spill: “I Played Ping-Pong” With Thurber…The New Yorker’s Roger Angell Interview; John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin; The Tilley Watch Online: February 10-14, 2020

Interview Of Interest: Roger Angell

From The New Yorker, this terrif interview of Roger Angell by Willing Davidson, a senior editor at the magazine: “Baseball, Fiction, And Life: Roger Angell’s Era-spanning Career At The New Yorker”

Left: Mr. Angell, wearing the hat, with another New Yorker era-spanner, Edward Koren

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John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin

When I meet up with cartoonists here in the Hudson Valley it’s a rare thing for any drawing to be done. Most of the time — 99.999% of the time — is spent jabbering about all kinds of things. But — there’s always a but, right? — yesterday while sitting in a bakery/coffee joint with New Yorker colleagues, Danny Shanahan and John Cuneo, John began to describe a cover he’s working on for Michael Gerber’s fab American Bystander. As the fine tip Uniball pen often cuts to the chase quicker than the spoken word, John grabbed a napkin and within seconds ( a minute at most) drew the above. Hoarder that I am, I asked him if I could have it just as he was about to crumple it up, and then asked if he would sign it. Luckily, he was  agreeable-enough to both requests. I’ll run his sketch again side-by-side the finished piece once it appears on The American Bystander.

—My thanks to John Cuneo for sharing his napkin with the Spill. 

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The Tilley Watch Online

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features,  February 10-14, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Amy Hwang, Ivan Ehlers, Kim Warp, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash.

Daily Shouts:  Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), J.A.K. (with Harris Mayersohn),

…And:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

“Dinner Party” — A video with Marc Philippe Eskenazi, who was at one time an assistant in the cartoon department.

 

 

The Tilleys They Are A-Changin’… The New Yorker’s 95th Anniversary Issue, February 17, 2020

The cover above, by Rea Irvin, appeared on the very first issue of The New Yorker — thereafter it showed up for every anniversary issue from 1926 through 1993. If you happen to have a bunch of those anniversary issues and fan them out on your floor — such as I did back in 2008 — they look pretty neat:

In 1994, Tina Brown broke the string of Rea Irvin Tilleys by running Robert Crumb’s “Elvis Tilley.”  Since 1994 Mr. Irvin’s original cover (with slight alterations from time-to-time) has been seen in the years 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009. It was last seen 2011.

In 1995, Irvin’s Tilley appeared swimming in gold to celebrate the magazine’s 75th anniversary. When the original Tilley hasn’t appeared he’s been replaced by look-a-likes, or take-offs, or homages, or what-have-yous. Sometimes Tilley has been left off/left out altogether. On this week’s 95th anniversary issue, there is, what’s described on the Table of Contents, an “origin” cover by Barry Blitt (who also supplied the Tilley-ish spot drawings this week).

My instinct to gather has led to the below gallery of substitute anniversary covers, from Crumb to Blitt. Included are the covers that have no Tilley reference whatsoever but appeared in the anniversary slot.

Above: the non-Tilley anniversary cover artists: R. Crumb (1994), R.O. Blechman (1996), Art Spiegelman (1997), Michael Roberts (1998), Edward Sorel 1999), William Wegman 2000), Chris Ware (2005), Seth (2008), Chris Ware (2010), Bruce McCall (2012), Simon Greiner (2013) Jorge Colombo (2014), Barry Blitt (2015), Liniers (2016), John W. Tomac (2017), Malika Favre (2018), Kadir Nelson (2019), Barry Blitt (2020)

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

 Zoe Si is the first newbie of 2020. She is the fifty-fourth new cartoonist brought into the magazine’s stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Fourteen cartoons in this issue (fifteen cartoonists as Emily Flake provided a “Sketchpad”), with two cartoon gods on board: Edward Koren and George Booth.  With Valentine’s Day approaching, cartoon love is in the issue, including a great cupid cartoon by Paul Noth and a fab love & justice drawing by Peter Vey.  A Spill round of applause for those as well as Bruce Eric Kaplan’s splendid dinner party drawing.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: this being a big birthday issue, I had low high hopes for a return of Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead (shown below).  Alas, the spring of 2017 re-draw is still in place. Read about the original and its replacement here.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 10, 2020

The Cover: a photographer. Go here to read a short Q&A with the cover artist, Malika Favre. 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Random thoughts on just a few of the dozen drawings in the issue

Two New Yorker Cartoon Gods in this issue: Sam Gross and Edward Koren. Mr. Gross, who has the lead cartoon in the issue — and what a great drawing it is! — has been contributing since 1969.  Mr. Koren has been contributing his fab work, covers and drawings, since 1962.

…the issue’s second drawing — it’s by Emily Bernstein — features a fiery ball heading for Earth (a meteor? Guess it doesn’t matter exactly what it is. What it is for certain is trouble). It’s the second fiery ball about to crash into Earth drawing in the magazine within the past three issues (Jessica Olien had one in the issue of January 27th). Is the fiery ball about to hit Earth the new crash test dummy scenario?  These aren’t the first published by the magazine — my hope is they won’t be the last. Can’t wait to see what colleagues do with it (haven’t tried one yet myself, but the day is young).

…I really like Mike Twohy’s personal info drawing (p. 36). He employs a little used (anymore)  folksinger scenario. I’m always reminded, seeing a folksinger drawing, of the one below by the late, exceptionally great, Charles Saxon. I first saw it in The New Yorker Album Of Drawings 1925-1975  (I started my collection with that Album). The drawing originally appeared as a full page in The New Yorker issue of January 24, 1970.

…Jeremy Nguyen’s drawing (p. 38) deals with an issue  — table wobble — most of us have dealt with at one time or another. A fun intricate well-executed drawing…

…J.A.K.’s octopus on page 42 brought to mind an on-the-spot cartoon fact-checking moment I experienced in front of an auditorium filled with school children about a decade ago. I’d just drawn an octopus on a large pad of paper. The school principal, standing onstage with me, came over and, counting aloud — a teaching moment — made sure I’d drawn all eight arms (I had). Mr. Katzenstein has drawn all eight arms as well (yes, I counted).

The Rea Irvin Missing Talk Masthead Watch

Rea Irvin, The New Yorker‘s art supervisor who gave us the magazine’s inaugural cover featuring Eustace Tilley, designed the above masthead. It sat in place for 92 years before being replaced in 2017 by a re-draw (heavens!). Read about it here. The magazine’s 95th anniversary issue, out next week, would be the perfect occasion to return Mr. Irvin’s iconic design.