A Kovarsky Scarf; Checking In On A New Yorker State Of Mind; Video Interview Of Interest: Edward Koren; Event Of Interest In Chicago: Ken Krimstein’s “Three Escapes Of Hannah Arendt”; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Brendan Loper

A detail from Attempted Bloggery

Attempted Bloggery looks at an Anatol Kovarsky scarf (perhaps the beginning of a cartoon clothing and accessories series?). Read here!

Mr. Kovarsky’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Anatol Kovarsky (photo above, NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) New Yorker work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

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Checking In On A New Yorker State Of Mind

With the Westminster Dog Show champion recently named, what better time to head over to A New Yorker State of Mind’s fascinating post covering the above issue of February 8, 1930. The cover artist: TheodoreHaupt.

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Video Interview of Interest: Edward Koren

From PBS Vermont, this video interview with Edward Koren, first aired April 13, 2003.

Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Link here to his website.

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Event of Interest in Chicago: Ken Krimstein’s “Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt”

Opening in March, an exhibit of work from Ken Krimstein’s excellent Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt. All the info here.

Mr. Krimstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2000. Link here to his website.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Trump today, of course. Brendan Loper handles the national emergency. Mr. Loper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker 94th Anniversary Issue; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Julia Suits

The very first issue.

The above cover does not appear on the New Yorker‘s 94th Anniversary issue; note the date and price. I’ve posted it — the very first New Yorker cover — because sentimental me misses seeing Rea Irvin’s iconic curiously curious Eustace Tilley, dressed in his oddly compelling finery. He hasn’t shown up since 2011 (below)…that seems like such a long time for him to be away. Sometimes it’s good to go back, before, you know, you drift too far from shore (to read about Kadir Nelson’s Tilley-inspired take-off on the cover of the current issue, go here).

The 86th anniversary issue


The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

It has made my week seeing George Booth’s drawing in the issue (p.47). It’s classic Booth. And no small thing, it inhabits the perfect space on the page — it is where it should be and it looks as it should look. And… it looks great. I could, and will, say the same for Edward Koren’s drawing (p.80).

Two of our cartoon gods delivering the goods, continuing to share their worlds, a half century or more since they began contributing to The New Yorker (Mr. Koren began in 1962, Mr. Booth in 1969).

Of interest to the weedsy cartoon folks: there is not just one caption-less cartoon in the issue — there are three (Seth Fleishman, Will McPhail, and Ed Steed). By caption-less, I should clarify that I mean a cartoon that appears without assistance from words in a box, or a title, or a thought balloon.

Finally, I end as I began: by mentioning the work of The New Yorker artist Rea Irvin. His beautiful masthead — the one that ran for most of the magazine’s 94 years but went missing in the Spring of 2017 (read about it here) is also still out of sight this anniversary week (well, two weeks, as it’s a double issue). It appears here once again, as it always does on Mondays, until someone tells me to cut it out (so to speak) or until it reappears in the magazine (and wouldn’t that be great).

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon (Trumpish, of course) is by Julia Suits, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006. Link here to her website.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 4, 2019

The Cover: Vegetation abounds. Here’s what the artist,Tom Gauld had to say about it.

The Cartoonists in the new issue:


The Magazine: Whenever February comes around, I begin thinking about the upcoming anniversary issue of The New Yorker, a favorite child here on this site (Spill visitors might remember this Tilley-centric piece I wrote for newyorker.com a few years back). Seeing Rea Irvin’s classic dandy this year would be such a welcome surprise. Even more of a surprise than, say, coming upon the now-famous Mandy the Mandarin duck in Central Park. It’s been awhile since we’ve seen Irvin’s iconic cover. In fact, the last time was in 2011. So what will next week’s cover be: the dandy or a duck?



Ink Spill’s 2018 Book Round-Up

Gathered below, in no particular order, are some of the books published this year by New Yorker artists, or including New Yorker artists.

In The Wild  by Edward Koren. Ampress.  Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962.

 

I Love You: Stories and Cartoons by Sara Lautman. Retrofit Comics. Ms. Lautman began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

 

The Illustrated History of the Snowman  by Bob Eckstein. Globe Pequot Press. Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

Be the Person Your Dog Thinks You Are. By C.J. Frick. Illustrations by Liza Donnelly. Flatiron Books. Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.

 

The Three Escapes of Hannah Arendt: A Tyranny of Truth  by Ken Krimstein. Bloomsbury Publishing. Mr. Krimstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2000.

 

Passing For Human: A Graphic Memoir  by Liana Finck. Random House.  Ms. Finck began contributing to The New Yorker  in  2013.

 

I Think, Therefore I Draw: Understanding Philosophy Through Cartoons by Thomas Cathcart and Daniel Klein. Penguin Books. Assorted New Yorker cartoons throughout by a number of the magazine’s contributors.

 

How To Sell Your Parents To The Aliens by Paul Noth. Bloomsbury USA. Mr. Noth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2004.

 

 

A Sidecar Named Desire: Great Writers and the Booze That Stirred Them by New Yorker illustrator Greg Clarke, and art director/graphic designer, Monte Beauchamp.  Dey St.  Lovely illustrations, with a small wealth of famed New Yorker “names” tossed around  (E.B. White, Dorothy Parker, John Held, Jr., Peter De Vries, etc.).

 

Assume The Worst: The Graduation Speech You’ll Never Hear.  By Carl Hiaasen.  Illustrated by Roz Chast. Knopf.  Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.

 

Memoirs Of A Very Stable Genius by Shannon Wheeler. Image Comics.  Mr. Wheeler began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

 

Someone Farted by Bruce Eric Kaplan. Simon & Schuster.  Mr. Kaplan began contributing to The New Yorker in 1991.

 

Kafkaesque: Fourteen Stories by Peter Kuper.  W.W. Norton & Co. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.

 

Eraser by Anna Kang. Illustrated by Christopher Weyant. Two Lions. Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in  1998.

 

The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons. Blackdog & Leventhal.  An anthology, non-traditionally arranged. 

 

 

Happy Birthday, Edward Koren!

Birthday hats off to one of The New Yorker‘s great artists, Edward Koren, born on this day in 1935.  Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Since his debut he’s contributed over 1000 cartoons and numerous covers to the magazine.

Below: a fave Koren New Yorker cover.  Published December 31, 1979.

 Below: his latest collection of cartoons.