The Tilley Watch Online, Newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoons, February 4-8, 2019; Post-Auction Hokinsons On Attempted Bloggery; A Charles Saxon Shout-Out

This week’s Daily cartoons — close to 100% Trumpian — were contributed by Jason Adam Katzenstein, Michael Shaw, Peter Kuper, Barry Blitt, and Christopher Weyant.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Ed Steed, Tim Hamilton, Roz Chast, and Emily Flake.

See all of the above and more here on newyorker.com

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Post-Auction Hokinsons on Attempted Bloggery

Published January 1944 in The New Yorker

Attempted Bloggery has been taking a look at a small crop of Helen Hokinson drawings recently up-for-auction. You should take a look too!

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A Charles Saxon Shout-Out

A Charles Saxon cartoon anthology from 1977

It’s always a treat to see one cartoonist say nice things about another. Here’s Bill Abbott on Facebook talking about the late very great Charles Saxon.*

* Mr. Abbott suggests in his shout out that Saxon “never actually wrote any of his own material” — I believe he’s thinking of George Price, who is the only New Yorker cartoonist, other than Helen Hokinson, who relied solely on provided ideas.

And here’s Charles Saxon’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Saxon Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. NYer work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

Bonus! Here’s a link to a fun Saxon photo I’d not seen until this morning.


The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 28, 2019

The Cover this week — rushed released days earlier — is from the masterful pen of John Cuneo. Below is an early version of the published cover, provided courtesy of Mr. Cuneo.

The Cartoonists (note the Spots contribution from Ed Steed) :

The Cartoons:

A little bit of something for everyone in this issue: an ice fisherman, a whale, a cat person in a dog park, a windy city street, imbibing cave people, a library, clowns, the subway, domestic situations, the mob, a police lineup, a restaurant scenario, Snow White.

Cartoon placement-wise, it was good to see some stretching out from the usual rectangular box seated in a corner of a page. Frank Cotham’s basement drawing run three columns wide (on page 30) is a good example, as is Zach Kanin’s ice fisherman on page 63 and Liana Finck’s drawing on page 72. Brendan Loper’s party-folk drawing on page 44, and Kim Warp’s police lineup drawing on page 48 were also given more breathing room. Then there’s Will McPhail’s full page (with the “Sketchbook” heading of “L’) on page 43. I’ve given this drawing some extra thought this morning, wondering if it needed the “Sketchbook” heading. What exactly does the “Sketchbook” designation bring to the page. I also wonder if those outside the New York/ Metropolitan area understand that the “L” refers to the “L” line of the New York City subway system (and local stories concerning the line). And then there’s the question of whether the “L” train reference actually means something here that’s essential to understanding the little story played out in sequence. Perhaps, perhaps. Perhaps not. So many questions! Anyway, it’s a fun drawing that works well no matter the subway line. As noted with a hint of impatience on Cartoon Companion, New Yorker subway cartoons have become nearly a standard scenario in recent months. I continue to believe that no scenario is played-out if the idea works well.

A subway sidenote: when I think of previous multi-panel subway cartoons my first thought is of this one by Liza Donnelly from the New Yorker issue of April 14, 1986. And speaking of Ms. Donnelly, in her cave man drawing on page 21 of this latest issue of the magazine there’s not a cave man in sight.

I’ve been re-watching the entire run of “The Sopranos” lately, so Joe Dator’s cement shoe drawing on page 52 grabbed my attention. I especially enjoyed seeing the George Boothian bare light bulb hanging down from the ceiling.

This issue marks the New Yorker print debut for Emily Bernstein. Ms. Bernstein is the third new New Yorker cartoonist of the year and the 28th since Emma Allen became the magazine’s cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Tilley Watch again signs-off with a nod to the missing Rea Irvin masthead (seen below). Read about it here.


New Yorker Cartoonists Holiday Party

Decades ago, in the William Shawn era, New Yorker cartoonists celebrated the holidays in-house (specifically, in-department).  They’d show up at the office and drink punch provided by the art editor Lee Lorenz and his assistant, Anne Hall. Cartoonists would sample rum balls brought in by their colleague, Henry Martin.  During the Tina Brown years the holiday party went big time, when all departments went out-of-office and co-mingled in (mostly) downtown establishments.  Coming full circle this year’s party for cartoonists came back home to the offices (yay!).  Last night’s shindig was hosted by the cartoon editor, Emma Allen, and the assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes (and, shades of Henry Martin, cartoonist David Borchart even brought in some homemade cookies).

Ink Spill‘s official photographer for the evening, cartoonist Liza Donnelly attended the festivities, and captured the scene. 

Below, left to right: Kendra Allenby, Ali Soloman, Farley Katz and Emma Allen.

Below: in the foreground, Robert Leighton (on the left) speaks with Ed Steed. In the back, left-to-right, with his back to the camera is Colin Stokes, Avi Steinberg (in the hat), and a partially obscured Ellis Rosen. Between Mr. Steinberg and Mr. Ellis is the fabulous Peter Arno New Yorker cover of June 5, 1954.

Below: a frieze of cartoonists. Will mention just a few: to the far left is Emma Hunsinger. To the far right, second in, is PC. Vey.

 

Below: Mort Gerberg (on the left) and George Booth.

Below, left-to-right: Avi Steinberg, Karen Sneider, Jason Adam Katzenstein, and, with her back to the camera, Gabrielle Bell.

Below: foreground, looking at the camera is Sophia Warren, then Robert Leighton, and (with eyepatch) Mort Gerberg. In the background: far left, is Ed Steed, then (with back to camera) David Sipress, Joe Dator (with scarf), and Kendra Allenby.

Below: on the far left is Joe Dator, and then Emily Flake and Marisa Acocella.

 

Below: a waving Jeremy Nguyen and Maggie Larson. Far left, in the back is Brendan Loper.

Below, left to right:  George Booth, Liza Donnelly, and David Borchart (this photo courtesy of  Mr. Borchart).

Below: Felipe Galindo and Drew Dernavich.

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Below: The New Yorker‘s Jack-of-All Trades,Stanley Ledbetter, Johnny DiNapoli, Farley Katz, and Ellis Rosen.

Below, left to right: David Sipress and Ben Schwartz.

Below: Emma Allen and Farley Katz.

Below: the ever festive Rea Irvin type-faced logo!

 

— My thanks to Liza Donnelly, Colin Stokes, Emma Allen, and David Borchart for their assistance  with this post.

 

 

Cartoon Collection Of Interest: The Ultimate Cartoon Book Of Book Cartoons

We’ll have to wait til April for it, but judging by the “Look Inside” available on Amazon, The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons will be well worth the wait. Published by Princeton Architectural Press, the anthology was edited by New Yorker cartoonist, Bob Eckstein.

Mr. Eckstein has packed the pages with New Yorker contributors such as Sam Gross (whose drawing graces the cover), Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, Peter Steiner, Roz Chast, Arnie Levin, George Booth, David Borchart, Ed Steed, John O’Brien, and many more (the full list is below).

If you love cartoons, books and bookstores, this is most definitely the collection for you.

Complete List of Contributors:

Marisa Acocella, George Booth, David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, Roz Chast, Frank Cotham, Liza Donnelly, Nick Downes, Bob Eckstein, Liana Finck, Alex Gregory, Sam Gross, William Haefeli, Sid Harris, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Robert Leighton, Arnie Levin, Bob Mankoff, Michael Maslin, Paul Noth, John O’Brien, Danny Shanahan, Michael Shaw, Barbara Smaller, Ed Steed, Peter Steiner, Mick Stevens, Julia Suits, P.C. Vey, Kim Warp, Christopher Weyant, Jack Ziegler.

 

 

 

 

The Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue Of October 29, 2018

It’s not a trick: this post about the October 29, 2018 New Yorker looks and feels and reads suspiciously like the Spill’s now defunct Monday Tilley Watch, but it’s not a Monday Tilley Watch…I think.

So often in the past 90+ years of The New Yorker ‘s existence, an issue dated October 29 (or 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, or 31) would bear a Halloween cover. Not this year, folks.  But who doesn’t like pastries.

Just for fun, here’s a cover submission of mine that combines pastries and Halloween — it was probably submitted, and definitely rejected, in the late 1980s or early 1990s:

 You’ll find more than twenty illustrations in this issue (not including the seven photographs accompanying the piece by Janet Malcolm). Four-and-a-half full pages are given over to illustration.  You’ll find ten cartoons. There’s a Halloween cartoon (by a modern Spill fave cartoonist, Seth Fleishman) squeezed in at the top of page 32.

If you’re a leaf-peeper, or just like leaves in general, you’re sure to fall for Joe Dator’s brilliant desert island drawing (on page 41). There have been, of course, other brilliant New Yorker cartoons in the not-so-distant past; two that I can’t resist mentioning whenever I have the chance:  Bob Eckstein’s 3-D Thanksgiving drawing and Robert Leighton’s Escher drawing. If you link to C-Span’s coverage of the recent Milford Readers & Writers Festival you’ll see a few more candidates by panelists, Christopher Weyant and David Borchart. This current drawing by Mr. Dator sits squarely in the Charles Addams branch of New Yorker cartooning (a branch notably climbed by P.C. Vey, Gahan Wilson, Zach Kanin…and Ed Steed, sort of). I would go as far as suggesting that if Mr. Addams was still with us, the magazine would’ve wanted to purchase Mr. Dator’s idea to hand over to Mr. Addams to execute. Yes, pun intended.  (Here’s a Spill piece about the magazine’s history of buying ideas).

For the record (your honor), here are the ten cartoonists in the issue:

 

— Finally, still in the Halloween spirit, here’s a Boo!

Below: the missing Rea Irvin iconic Talk masthead switched out for a re-drawn version early last year. Read about that here: