Exhibit of Interest: Mary Petty; Article of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist John Cuneo; The Tilley Watch Online; And Even More E. Simms Campbell

Exhibit of Interest: Mary Petty

 What fun! 30 Mary Petty watercolors on exhibit at the Huntsville (Alabama) Museum of Art:  The Life and Art of Mary Petty.

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Article of Interest: New Yorker Cover Artist John Cuneo

From HV1, April 11, 2018, “Dancing Bears and John Cuneo’s Portable Therapy” — this good read about the fascinating Mr. Cuneo.

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The Tilley Watch Online: April 9-13

The week’s Daily Cartoons were courtesy of: Peter Kuper (Trump’s cabinet), Ellis Rosen (politics: Michael Cohen), Kim Warp ( Facebook), Brendan Loper (politics: Trump-related), and Paul Noth (taxes)

On Daily Shouts, contributing the New Yorker cartoonists were Maddie Dai, Kim Warp, and Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell

All of the above, and more, can be seen here.

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And Even More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

As the world turns, let’s not forget that Stephen Nadler continues his E. Simms Campbell fest on his wonderful blog.  So much to see there (here).

Here’s Mr. Campbell’s entry on the A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell (photo above) Born, 1906. Died, 1971. NYer work: 1932 -1942. Key collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist); More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

 

 

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery; Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

Interview of Interest: Sam Gross

Yesterday Jane Mattimoe gave us an audio snippet of her recent interview with the great Sam Gross.  Today we get the whole print interview right here.

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC”s “Max” and “Simon” return with their up-close takes on each and every cartoon in the new issue (y’know, the issue with the brain on the cover).  Read it all here.

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Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Above is just a sample.  To see more, go to Stephen Nadler’s wonderful blog here.

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Finally, it was exactly one year ago today that we lost Jack Ziegler, one of the New Yorker‘s cartoon gods. I’m posting something I wrote, in tribute, shortly after he passed away. It has never been published til now.

Jack Ziegler: Calmly Zany

The New Yorker hadn’t seen anyone like Jack Ziegler – or more precisely, like Jack Ziegler’s cartoons — when he began submitting his work in the early 1970s. The craziest art the magazine had allowed in was perhaps Edward Koren’s furry, or fuzzy creatures, and of course, Saul Steinberg’s figurative flights of fancy.  Jack brought in a completely different bag of tricks filled with a sensibility borne out of the Mad magazine school of art, but with a firm grasp of New Yorker art history in mind.  He knew what he was doing, and in the great tradition of the magazine’s best artists, he was doing it for himself, to amuse himself. He was not trying to be like a New Yorker cartoonist; he was doing Jack Ziegler cartoons that he wanted to see published in the New Yorker.

His cartoon-like sensibility found hilarity in, most famously, hamburgers and toasters, and, of course, human beings. For Jack, the backyard hibachi was turned into a shrine-like thing of beauty in a Mt. Rushmore like setting complete with Japanese inspired cloud-work.  The regular guy he added to many of his drawings – he called him his “onlooker”  — was always slightly surprised to find himself looking at, say, an enormous hamburger on a beach. I imagine the onlooker was actually Jack, within his own world, not particularly shocked, but accepting of whatever freaky thing he’d come upon in a given cartoon panel.

Jack’s world was a calmly zany world, gleefully shared with all of us.  His work was like the man himself: calmly zany.  He had a wonderful little burst of  laughter when it occurred to him that one of life’s little moments was hysterical. He recognized so many of them in these past forty-three years.  Here’s to sinister Mr. Coffee machines, and giant toasters, and sensitive cowboys, and superheroes losing their shorts, mid-air!

 

 

Harold Ross: Six Getty Images; And Even More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Harold Ross: Some Getty Images

The above is obviously not an image from the Getty images photo archives — those cost to license. Above is Rea Irvin‘s cover for a parody issue of the New Yorker celebrating Harold Ross‘s 34th birthday, with Mr. Irvin substituting Mr. Ross for Eustace Tilley. To see a small array of photos of Mr. Ross, link here to the Getty site. I find it amusing that the half-dozen Ross’s photos are surrounded by other photos (a sea shell, commuters, exotic locations).

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Even More E. Simms Campbell from Attempted Bloggery

Over on Attempted Bloggery  the tribute to the work of E. Simms Campbell continues.  See it here!

Marisa Acocella’s Animation; Blog Post of Interest: Captionless Cartoons; Campbell Fest Rolls On

Marisa Acocella’s Animation

Marisa Acocella’s animated “Mission Control” is up on Youtube See it here.

Ms. Acocella began contributing to the New Yorker in 1998.  Her most recent book was Ann Tenna.

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Blog Post of Interest: Captionless Cartoons

Thanks to Dick Buchanan by way of Mike Lynch’s blog we can see a sampling of non-New Yorker captionless cartoons from 1938 – 1970.  A number of New Yorker cartoonists are represented, such as Everett Opie, above. See all the work here. 

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E. Simms Campbell Fest Continues on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s blog continues to direct a spotlight on Mr. Campbell’s Esquire work.  See the latest post here!

Here’s Mr. Campbell’s entry on the A-Z:

E. Simms Campbell (above) Born, 1906. Died, 1971. New Yorker work: 1932 -1942. Key collections: Cuties in Arms (1943) – the earliest published collection of cartoons by an African-American cartoonist); More Cuties in Arms (also 1943); and Chorus of Cuties (1953)

Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery; New Yorker State of Mind on the New Yorker’s 1929 Anniversary Issue

Lots More E. Simms Campbell on Attempted Bloggery

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery continues its E. Simms Campbell fest with a lot more drawings. Go see!

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New Yorker State of Mind on the New Yorker’s 1929 Anniversary Issue

Another Ink Spill favorite blog, A New Yorker State of Mind: Reading Every Issue of The New Yorker looks at the magazine’s fourth anniversary issue. Much fun!