More MoCCA Today (With Photos) & “My First MoCCA”; David Sipress On A 1969 Harvard Protest

More MoCCA Today

At least three New Yorker cartoonist events scheduled today: Liana Finck in conversation with Gabrielle Bell; a “spotlight” on Mark Alan Stamaty; Emily Flake as part of a panel, “Narratives On Motherhood”; cover artist Ivan Brunetti in a panel on “Comics and the Teaching Artist” (right: Ms. Bell and Ms. Finck today. Courtesy of Stephen Nadler).

And more photos from today (all courtesy of Liza Donnelly, with the exception of the Mark Alan Stamaty photo.  That’s another courtesy of Stephen Nadler):

Top row, l-r: Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo, Mark Parisi, Ellis Rosen.

Middle row: Arnold Roth & Caroline Roth, Liza Donnelly, Keith Knight.

Bottom: Mark Alan Stamaty (l), and Bill Kartalopoulos, who, among other things, is MoCCA’s Programming Director, and Series Editor for The Best American Comics series. 

My First MoCCA:  A Personal Take

Judging by the scene I dove into at yesterday’s MoCCA Fest, the appetite for, and practice of comics and cartoons is booming. The place (the Metropolitan West on West 46th Street) was at capacity, loud and energized. I took in the must-see Cartooning For Peace exhibit on the second floor (curated by The New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly) then immediately ran into Dick Buchanan (who for quite some time has been sharing his voluminous cartoon file via Mike Lynch’s site). Mr. Buchanan had told me earlier in the week  that he’d be at the fest, and would bring along a copy of a book I’d never seen before:  Bernard Wiseman’s Cartoon Countdown (published in 1959). Mr. Wiseman contributed 197 cartoons to The New Yorker, from April 19, 1947 – June 11. 1960.

In the pr copy on the first page:

This is the first book of cartoons devoted exclusively  to he Conquest of Space. Let the Russians Match That! 

(to the right: The Cartooning For Peace Exhibit)

With  thanks to Mr. Buchanan for Cartoon Countdown, it was on to a tour of the fest.

 

  The illustrator Tom Bloom was seen engaged in conversation with an exhibitor, the illustrator/educator, Steve Guernaccia blew by (he’s hard to miss, sartorially). The multitude of people, of tables laden with products bearing graphic images, posters, cards, etc., etc., was astounding. Along with me on the tour was one of my co-panelists, Danny Shanahan.  We were moving along at a good pace with the flow of the crowd when a familiar book cover on the New York Review Comics table got our attention: Saul Steinberg’s recently reissued Labyrinth (also on the table were a number of Maira Kalaman titles).  I bet Steinberg would’ve enjoyed the scene passing by his book.

Closing in on the slotted time for our panel with Mort Gerberg, we headed over to Ink48 on 11th Avenue, where the panels took place. Ran into Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery  who reminded us that Mark Alan Stamaty was signing his anniversary edition of MacDoodle Street.

Co-panelist Bob Eckstein awaited us in the Garamond Room, where we were soon joined by Marisa Acocella, and the man of the hour, Mort Gerberg. Spotted in our audience were New Yorker contributors,  R. Sikoryak, and Sophia Warren, as well as friend to all comics creators, Karen Greene of Columbia University. Below photos of the panel courtesy of Mr. Nadler (l-r, Danny Shanahan, Bob Eckstein, myself, Marisa Acocella, and Mr. Gerberg).

One of the fun things to come out of paneling with colleagues is the unexpected nugget or two of New Yorker history. As he discussed selling his first cartoon to The New Yorker back in 1965 , Mr. Gerberg told us — and this is something I had never heard, and didn’t realize was even possible — that he had talked the then art editor, James Geraghty into allowing what was supposed to be a bought idea of Mr. Gerberg’s to become a bought drawing. New Yorker history buffs know that it was routine at the magazine back then to buy ideas and give them to established cartoonists. It’s quite a thing that Mr. Gerberg, with his first sale to the magazine, was not only able to buck that well-entrenched system, but to deliver the full page below (published in October 20,1965).

  After our panel concluded we panelists stayed in the same room to attend the next panel,  “Professional Development 101: Art Directors Roundtable.” How could we not –it included our very own cartoon editor, Emma Allen. As we moved into the audience we spotted fellow colleagues, Kendra Allenby, Tracey Berglund, and cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey. Ms. Allen was joined by Matt Lubchansky (of The Nib), Alexandra Zsigmond (formerly The New York Times), Will Varner (formerly Buzzfeed), and artist/educator, Viktor Koen, who moderated.  The “101” in the panel title was accurate — we heard what the scene was like for today’s beginning illustrator/artists trying to break in. One piece of advice from Ms. Allen that stood out for me:  something that would make her laugh while looking at [written and drawn] humor for four hours in a day, had an excellent shot.

By the way, the place was packed.

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David Sipress On A Harvard Protest In 1969

Mr. Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998, has a Personal History piece on newyorker.com: “Fake News, 1969: My Slightly Infamous Role In The Harvard Antiwar Protests”

 

 

A George Booth Film!; A Q&A Of Interest: Ellis Rosen; The Traveling Cartoon Museum; Liza Donnelly To Judge Cartoons In Cuba; More From The Dick Buchanan Files Via Mike Lynch; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Peter Kuper

A George Booth Film!

Happy to report that a George Booth film is in the works. Mr. Booth is, of course, one of the gods of The New Yorker‘s cartoon world.  This year marks his 50th year at the magazine.  Read about the film and George Booth, and see a Kickstarter teaser clip here.

Here’s Mr. Booth’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

George Booth (photo above taken in NYC 2016, courtesy of Liza Donnelly) Born June 28, 1926, Cainesville, MO. New Yorker work: 1969 – . Key collections: Think Good Thoughts About A Pussycat (Dodd, Mead, 1975), Rehearsal’s Off! (Dodd, Mead, 1976), Omnibooth: The Best of George Booth ( Congdon & Weed, 1984), The Essential George Booth, Compiled and Edited by Lee Lorenz ( Workman, 1998).

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A Q&A Of Interest: Ellis Rosen

From Unsettled, “Q&A With Ellis Rosen, Cartoonist And illustrator For The New Yorker” 

Mr. Ellis began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.  Visit his website here.

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The Traveling Cartoon Museum

The Museum of Cartoon Art first caught my attention in September of 1980 when the article above appeared in The New York Times. Since then the museum has moved about a good deal (for a museum). This is a good catching up article about its travels: “The Rocky History of Connecticut’s Cartoon Museum” — from the CTPost, March 21, 2019.

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Liza Donnelly To Judge Cartoons In Cuba

Liza Donnelly, that globe-trotting New Yorker cartoonist (she was live-drawing on China’s Great Wall not long ago; she’s shown above live-drawing at a conference in Brussels last week) is off to Cuba in a few days to join in the judging of cartoons for the 21st Bienal International De Humorismo Grafico.  Info here.

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More From The Dick Buchanan Files Via Mike Lynch

Dick Buchanan continues to share his incredible cartoon tear sheet collection via Mike Lynch’s blog. Without Mr. Buchanan (and Mr. Lynch), such great work as Gahan Wilson’s cartoon from Collier’s (shown above) might be lost to the ages.

This is how Mike introduced the latest Buchanan Files:

Thank you, you lovely, crazy Dick Buchanan, for diving into your files in your Greenwich Village apartment so many times and coming up with these pretty-much-unseen-since-publication single panel cartoons. These are, as you will see, crazy good.

See all the work here.

And speaking of Gahan Wilson, the GOFundMe campaign for him is still underway.  Go here to read more, and contribute.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Today’s Daily cartoon, Trump not letting go, not letting up, is by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011. Link to his website here.

Playful Pages; Early Gahan Wilson Art; Yesterday’s and Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon

Playful Pages

On many a Monday Tilley Watch I mention placement of art. Usually I’m talking about how large a drawing appears on the page, and where it sits. I’m fairly certain I’ve also mentioned how the art once played across the pages of The New Yorker, creatively interacting with text.  While randomly (electronically) flipping through elder issues of The New Yorker this morning I happened upon some examples.  The first one (by Al Frueh) is especially striking:

Below: Julian de Miskey, February 6, 1926.

Below: JTI, November 6, 1926.

Below: unsigned, November 24, 1928

Below: Leonard Dove, on the left and Rea Irvin on the right, November 24, 1928.

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Early Gahan Wilson

If you head over to Mike Lynch’s blog you’ll see, courtesy of Dick Buchanan, a great selection of early Gahan Wilson art.  And be sure to link to the Gahan Wilson GoFundMe campaign that’s in progress Mr. Wilson, one of the New Yorker cartoon gods,  is suffering from severe dementia. 

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Today’s Daily

Yesterday’s Daily cartoon was a duo effort: Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley.  Today’s cartoon is by Emily Flake.

Jason Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017, Emily Flake in 2008.

Move Over Addams, Steinberg Did An 89 Foot Long Mural; Dick Buchanan’s Tip Of The Hat To Funny Ladies At The New Yorker Show, and …A First Glimpse of the Exhibit

Steinberg’s 89 Foot Mural

We recently learned of a fourteen foot mural Charles Addams executed (a good Addamsy word!); well here’s a piece in Cincinnati Magazine about an eighty-nine foot Steinberg mural.  Wowzers.

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Dick Buchanan’s Tip Of The Hat To Funny Ladies At The New Yorker

Via Mike Lynch’s site: “From The Dick Buchanan Files: Women Cartoonists: Barbara Shermund, Hilda Terry, Mary Gibson, and Dorothy McKay 1935-1952”

Mr. Buchanan’s latest file finds are in honor of the upcoming Society of Illustrators exhibit, Funny Ladies At The New Yorker: Cartoonists Then and Now

Liza Donnelly, who curated the show, has posted (on Instagram) a preview photo. Nice blow-up of a Helen Hokinson drawing! : 

 

Chatfield Pencilled; From Dick Buchanan’s Files: Work by Gardner Rea; Splat! New Yorker Reveals Its Next Cover; Even More Cartoons; New Yorker Union Certified

Chatfield Pencilled

Jason Chatfield is up next on A Case For Pencils, Jane Mattimoe’s wonderful blog wherein New Yorker cartoonists show us their tools of the trade.  Read it here!

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 From Dick Buchanan’s files via Mike Lynch: Gardner Rea

Mike Lynch has posted another bevy of cartoons from Dick Buchanan’s Files.  This time it’s work from the underappreciated Gardner Rea.  See it all here

Here’s Mr. Rea’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Gardner Rea (self portrait above from Collier’s Collects Its Wits. Photo from Rea’s NYTs obit, 1966.) Born, Ironton, Ohio 1892. Died, 1966. Collections: The Gentleman Says It’s Pixies / Collier’s Cartoons by Gardner Rea (Robert McBride & Co. 1944), Gardner Rea’s Sideshow (Robert McBride & Co, 1945). New Yorker work: 1st issue (February 21, 1925) – 1965.

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Splat! New Yorker Reveals Its Next Cover

Barry Blitt talks to Francoise Mouly about his cover (above) for next week’s issue. And here’s a Washington Post piece about it.

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Even More Cartoons

 12 more pages, showing 18 more cartoons have been released by the publisher of the upcoming (October) New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons. See them here on the book’s Amazon listing.

With 3000 images promised, we’ve been shown a total of 25.  Only 2975 to go!

Note to tote bag afficionadoes: If you preorder either the $800.00 deluxe edition or the not-deluxe $100.00 edition, you’ll receive a tote bag.

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New Yorker Union Certified

The News Guild of New York posted this photo on Twitter congratulating the New Yorker Union’s certification. Keen-eyed observers will note a portion of James Thurber’s wall drawings on the extreme right. The drawings have moved with the magazine since it left its second home at 25 West 43rd Street in 1991.

This is what the drawings look like without company :