Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Sipress; Interview Of Interest: P.C. Vey; Blitt’s Redacted New Yorker Cover

Today’s Daily cartoon, Mueller Report-ish, is by David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. See more of Mr. Sipress’s work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site here.

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Interview Of Interest: P.C. Vey

From Daily Hampshire Gazette, April 18, 2019, “Artmaker: Meet Peter Vey, Cartoonist and Illustrator”

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A Bonus Daily Cartoon: Barry Blitt’s Redacted New Yorker Cover

A bonus Daily Cartoon courtesy of Barry Blitt, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. To see the entire cover, go here. 

More MoCCA Today (With Photos) & “My First MoCCA”; David Sipress On A 1969 Harvard Protest

More MoCCA Today

At least three New Yorker cartoonist events scheduled today: Liana Finck in conversation with Gabrielle Bell; a “spotlight” on Mark Alan Stamaty; Emily Flake as part of a panel, “Narratives On Motherhood”; cover artist Ivan Brunetti in a panel on “Comics and the Teaching Artist” (right: Ms. Bell and Ms. Finck today. Courtesy of Stephen Nadler).

And more photos from today (all courtesy of Liza Donnelly, with the exception of the Mark Alan Stamaty photo.  That’s another courtesy of Stephen Nadler):

Top row, l-r: Peter Kuper, Felipe Galindo, Mark Parisi, Ellis Rosen.

Middle row: Arnold Roth & Caroline Roth, Liza Donnelly, Keith Knight.

Bottom: Mark Alan Stamaty (l), and Bill Kartalopoulos, who, among other things, is MoCCA’s Programming Director, and Series Editor for The Best American Comics series. 

My First MoCCA:  A Personal Take

Judging by the scene I dove into at yesterday’s MoCCA Fest, the appetite for, and practice of comics and cartoons is booming. The place (the Metropolitan West on West 46th Street) was at capacity, loud and energized. I took in the must-see Cartooning For Peace exhibit on the second floor (curated by The New Yorker cartoonist, Liza Donnelly) then immediately ran into Dick Buchanan (who for quite some time has been sharing his voluminous cartoon file via Mike Lynch’s site). Mr. Buchanan had told me earlier in the week  that he’d be at the fest, and would bring along a copy of a book I’d never seen before:  Bernard Wiseman’s Cartoon Countdown (published in 1959). Mr. Wiseman contributed 197 cartoons to The New Yorker, from April 19, 1947 – June 11. 1960.

In the pr copy on the first page:

This is the first book of cartoons devoted exclusively  to he Conquest of Space. Let the Russians Match That! 

(to the right: The Cartooning For Peace Exhibit)

With  thanks to Mr. Buchanan for Cartoon Countdown, it was on to a tour of the fest.

 

  The illustrator Tom Bloom was seen engaged in conversation with an exhibitor, the illustrator/educator, Steve Guernaccia blew by (he’s hard to miss, sartorially). The multitude of people, of tables laden with products bearing graphic images, posters, cards, etc., etc., was astounding. Along with me on the tour was one of my co-panelists, Danny Shanahan.  We were moving along at a good pace with the flow of the crowd when a familiar book cover on the New York Review Comics table got our attention: Saul Steinberg’s recently reissued Labyrinth (also on the table were a number of Maira Kalaman titles).  I bet Steinberg would’ve enjoyed the scene passing by his book.

Closing in on the slotted time for our panel with Mort Gerberg, we headed over to Ink48 on 11th Avenue, where the panels took place. Ran into Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery  who reminded us that Mark Alan Stamaty was signing his anniversary edition of MacDoodle Street.

Co-panelist Bob Eckstein awaited us in the Garamond Room, where we were soon joined by Marisa Acocella, and the man of the hour, Mort Gerberg. Spotted in our audience were New Yorker contributors,  R. Sikoryak, and Sophia Warren, as well as friend to all comics creators, Karen Greene of Columbia University. Below photos of the panel courtesy of Mr. Nadler (l-r, Danny Shanahan, Bob Eckstein, myself, Marisa Acocella, and Mr. Gerberg).

One of the fun things to come out of paneling with colleagues is the unexpected nugget or two of New Yorker history. As he discussed selling his first cartoon to The New Yorker back in 1965 , Mr. Gerberg told us — and this is something I had never heard, and didn’t realize was even possible — that he had talked the then art editor, James Geraghty into allowing what was supposed to be a bought idea of Mr. Gerberg’s to become a bought drawing. New Yorker history buffs know that it was routine at the magazine back then to buy ideas and give them to established cartoonists. It’s quite a thing that Mr. Gerberg, with his first sale to the magazine, was not only able to buck that well-entrenched system, but to deliver the full page below (published in October 20,1965).

  After our panel concluded we panelists stayed in the same room to attend the next panel,  “Professional Development 101: Art Directors Roundtable.” How could we not –it included our very own cartoon editor, Emma Allen. As we moved into the audience we spotted fellow colleagues, Kendra Allenby, Tracey Berglund, and cartoonist, Marc Bilgrey. Ms. Allen was joined by Matt Lubchansky (of The Nib), Alexandra Zsigmond (formerly The New York Times), Will Varner (formerly Buzzfeed), and artist/educator, Viktor Koen, who moderated.  The “101” in the panel title was accurate — we heard what the scene was like for today’s beginning illustrator/artists trying to break in. One piece of advice from Ms. Allen that stood out for me:  something that would make her laugh while looking at [written and drawn] humor for four hours in a day, had an excellent shot.

By the way, the place was packed.

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David Sipress On A Harvard Protest In 1969

Mr. Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998, has a Personal History piece on newyorker.com: “Fake News, 1969: My Slightly Infamous Role In The Harvard Antiwar Protests”

 

 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker March 18, 2019

The Cover: This is Malika Favre’s seventh cover for The New Yorker (according to the Contributors info on page 4). An exceptionally decorative cover for “The Style Issue”… Read more here

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A very Charles Addamsy David Sipress drawing this week (that’s a compliment, of course).

Cartoon placement on the page has been mentioned here numerous times: happy to say that seven (i.e., half) of the  cartoons in the issue were given breathing room. They look great.

Tom Cheney’s Hell’s Auditors cartoon especially caught my eye (it’s on page 29). I believe that this is the fourth time New Yorker cartoonists have specifically word-played with the Hell’s Angels “colors.” Jack Ziegler had two, this beauty, published in The New Yorker, February 27, 1989:

And an earlier one, published in The New Yorker, December 17, 1984:

And then there was this one by yours truly in the December 25th, 1995 issue of The New Yorker:

A quick search of The New Yorker‘s database shows over a hundred of its cartoons have incorporated a motorcycle.  Sometimes the bike and biker are bit players, and other times they’re the focus of the drawing.  An awful lot of the cartoons concern folks getting speeding tickets from a motorcycle cop (and many of them show the cop in-wait behind a billboard). 

There are a small number of cartoons with motorcyclists wearing colors, but the usage doesn’t include mention of the Hell’s Angels. Ed Arno’s motorcycle gang wearing jackets that read “Inflation Fighters” (published April 2, 1979) is one example. 

To return to the great Jack Ziegler for a moment, he used the Hell’s Angels colors once again, but left their name intact in this fabulous drawing published in The New Yorker, November 13, 2000:

A long long way from the subject of Hell’s Angels, for those interested in trivia: the first mention of a motorcycle cartoon in the New Yorker‘s database is Al Frueh’s cartoon in the February 13, 1926 issue.  The  second cartoon with a motorcycle in the picture was published December 7, 1929.  It set off a bit of a in-house squabble, but that’s a story for another time (the artist was Peter Arno).

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Lastly, still no sight of Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead. Read about it here, and see it below:

 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of February 11, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoon

The Cover: This week’s New Yorker cover is by Pascal Campion, his second cover for the magazine — his second moody metropolis scene. Read about it here. I wonder if we’ll see a moody mid-western, western, northeastern or southern scenario anytime soon.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Several nice surprises this week. The first was running into Sam Gross’s lead-in cartoon (his work has been appearing in the magazine for forty-nine years). There are certain cartoonists whose style alone gets the laugh meter buzzing. Mr. Gross is one of those cartoonists. The other surprise: R.O. Blechman’s “spot” drawings. Mr. Blechman’s wonderful drawings and covers have appeared in the magazine for forty-five years.

A third nice thing to see in this issue: the number of cartoons. Bumped up from the usual dozen or so to a healthy eighteen. They just keep on a-comin as you flip through the magazine (as do the illustrations).

If I have one little dark cloud to drag over this sunny moment it’s another plea for some of the work to be run larger (true, some cartoons run large, should be smaller). A number in this issue are, to my eyes, sized just right (a few for instances: Tom Cheney’s on page 54, and Jon Adams on page 52). Perfectly sized is Seth Fleishman’s terrific drawing on page 39. But others seem wedged into their corners; Roz Chast’s intricate Candy Land For Adults (page 32) and David Sipress’s off the beaten track restaurant (page 25) would benefit from more space. Really all I’m campaigning for is a graphic invitation for readers to fully appreciate the work. The work of the late George Price is a good example of how a cartoonist’s world can take us in for some detached momentary fun-time. Mr. Price’s drawings were usually allowed a lot of breathing room on the page. One paused to inspect the work, to enjoy all the “stuff” Price gave us. Imagine one of his drawings run in a little box on the corner of a page.

A few favorite drawings, or elements of drawings in this issue: Joe Dator’s monkey (page 40); Paul Noth’s drawing (page 60) — a great addition to the New Yorker‘s doctor canon; P.C. Vey’s theater drawing; Maddie Dai’s drawing of a sculptor and friend, as well as the caption; Frank Cotham’s perfect caption for his drawing (page 36). All fine, inspiring moments.

Next-to-Lastly, a mention of the newest cartoonist on the block: Ellie Black, the third newbie this year and the twenty-seventh new cartoonist brought in since Emma Allen became the magazine’s cartoon editor in May of 2017. A good debut, with a welcome unexpected play on the well-worn hands touching moment we’ve seen in movies and books.

And lastly, let us not forget the great work of Rea Irvin, especially his mothballed masthead design. Here it is:

Speaking of Mr. Irvin, I spoke too soon last week about the New Yorker‘s anniversary issue appearing this week. Had I bothered to consult the fine print publishing info found near the end of each issue I would’ve seen that next week’s magazine (a double issue: February 18 & 25) is the 94th anniversary issue.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, a post-Super Bowl tie-in, is by Farley Katz, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Link to his website here.

The Tilley Watch Online: The Newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoons, January 28 – February 1, 2019; Article Of Interest: Ken Krimstein; Thurber’s Last Drawings on Attempted Bloggery; Today’s Daily Cartoon

The New Yorker Daily cartoons this week were by Bob Eckstein, David Sipress, Lila Ash, Maddie Dai, Lars Kenseth, and David Ostow.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Roz Chast (the first of a monthly feature), Jason Adam Katzenstein, a Brendan Loper illustrated piece by Evan Allgood, Will McPhail, and Jeremy Nguyen.

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Article of Interest: Ken Krimstein

From chicagojewishnews.com, February 1, 2019, “Artist With A Pen: Chicagoan Ken Krimstein on his life as a cartoonist, and on his new book about Jewish philosopher Hannah Arendt, the subject of an exhibit at Spertus”

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Thurber’s Last Drawings On Attempted Bloggery

Attempted Bloggery looks at an early version of Thurber’s last published drawings (they appeared on the Time magazine Thurber cover story, July 9, 1951). See it here.

From the Time piece:

“After a lapse of several years, during which he did not draw at all, Thurber is drawing again (see cover). He works with chalk on black paper, preferably just at sundown on clear days. About the porch of his Connecticut home, where he has his drawing board set up, drawings are stacked along with stove wood.”

— Thurber also made it to the cover of Newsweek, and The Atlantic.

Newsweek, February 4, 1957, and below, The Atlantic, August 1956

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon (groundhogian of course) is by David Ostow, whose first New Yorker cartoon appeared in November of 2018. Link here to his website.