Sipress Sees The Birds; Feiffer, Katchor, Burns, Tomorrow, Mankoff & more at Small Press Expo; Books on the Horizon

 

birds

From newyorker.com, August 27, 2014:

“A Fear of The Birds — a piece by the cartoonist, David Sipress.

 

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

SPX_Poster_Gif1

From Michael Cavna’s  Washington Post “Comic Riffs” column, August 27, 2014, “SPX 2014: From alt-weeklies to web-comics, Small Press Expo announces its programming slate”

Among those scheduled to appear are Ben Katchor, Tom Tomorrow, Jules Feiffer, Charles Burns, and Bob Mankoff.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Far off in the distance,  a few books of interest have been listed on some popular bookseller websites:

From Thomas Kunkel, who authored  one of the very best New Yorker biographies, Genius in Disguise: Harold Ross of The New Yorker (Random House, 1995), comes Man in Profile: Joseph Mitchell of The New Yorker.  Due  April 21, 2015, from Random House.   No cover image & scant few details  as of now.

 

And in February of 2015, Writing For The New Yorker: Critical Essays on an American Periodical by Fiona Green (Edinburgh University Press). 9780748682492_p0_v1_s260x420Here’s what the publisher has to say:

Original critical essays on an iconic American periodical, providing new insights into twentieth-century literary culture

This collection of newly commissioned critical essays reads across and between New Yorker departments, from sports writing to short stories, cartoons to reporters at large, poetry to annals of business. Attending to the relations between these kinds of writing and the magazine’s visual and material constituents, the collection examines the distinctive ways in which imaginative writing has inhabited the ‘prime real estate’ of this enormously influential periodical. In bringing together a range of sharply angled analyses of particular authors, styles, columns, and pages, this book offers multiple perspectives on American writing and periodical culture at specific moments in twentieth-century history.

 

 

 

“60 Minutes” airs The Cartoonist

60 Minutes

In last night’s installment of 60 Minutes, Morley Safer & Company brought us “The Cartoonist” — a look at the weekly selection process for New Yorker cartoons, a glimpse of some of the cartoonists who show up at the magazine’s office every Tuesday, a peek at Editor David Remnick choosing which cartoons to buy, and a min-profile of the magazine’s current cartoon editor, Bob Mankoff.

An impressive number of cartoonists managed on-screen time in the thirteen-and-a-half minute segment including Robert Leighton, Paul Noth, Joe Dator, Bob Eckstein, Marisa Marchetto, Drew Dernavich, Corey Pandolph, Carolita Johnson, Emily Flake, Sam Gross, Mort Gerberg, Farley Katz, Charlie Hankin, Ben Schwartz, David Sipress and Roz Chast.  Go to The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank site to see work by any or all of these cartoonists.

Also, as you’d expect, a good number of cartoons went flashing by on the screen, including, the one below, only one of  two published in The New Yorker by J.S. Cook (both in 1927). j s cook

New New Yorker Cartoonists, Pt.3: Charlie Hankin

This is third part of an Ink Spill series looking at newer New Yorker cartoonists. I asked three of the most recent additions to the magazine’s stable of artists to tell us a little about themselves and how it was they ended up at The New Yorker (previously we heard from Liana Finck and Edward Steed). The  series wraps up with the newest of the trio: Charlie Hankin, whose first cartoon appeared in The New Yorker this past August (a Hankin cartoon from The New Yorker, October 14, 2014 appears below).

And now, here’s Charlie:

 

CharlieHankin_7615_cSashaArutyunova_WEB-1Hankin: Cardwells

I’ve been drawing cartoons in some form or another, on and off, since I was a kid. My main inspirations were strips and long-form pieces; I was young when Calvin and Hobbes stopped running, but I think I had read every strip by the time it ended, as well as most of the Tintin books. Eventually I grew into the more mature comics we had lying around the house–my dad curated a show of original work from Art Spiegelman’s RAW in 1987, and his complete collection of the series was a major discovery for me when I was a teenager. But gag cartooning always appealed to me, and I pored over anthologies of cartoons from Punch and The New Yorker.

My interest in cartooning went through cycles. I did single-panel bits for my high school newspaper, and then nothing until a single installment of a graphic-novel/zine I drew in college. After school, I got deep into realist painting. I also started a comedy webseries called Good Cop Great Cop with my friend Matt Porter. Maybe the merging of art and comedy finally attracted me to cartooning for The New Yorker. Either way, it seemed like a good fit: both the webseries and my paintings have undertones of dry, quiet absurdity.

Since entering the fold, it’s been great to meet some of the big names in cartooning–Roz Chast, David Sipress, Sam Gross, and of course Bob [Mankoff]. Ben Schwartz and Liam Walsh have both given me guidance. And I dig around the archives for extra inspiration. Much older generations aside (Chas Addams, Peter Arno, et al.), I love Mick Stevens, Mike Twohy, Tom Cheney, Leo Cullum, Jack Ziegler, Danny Shanahan, and too many others to name.

 

 

Further reading:

To see Charlie Hankin’s New Yorker work, link here to The New Yorker‘s Cartoon Bank.

Link here to visit Charlie’s webseries, Good Cop Great Cop.

To visit his website, link here:  charliehankin.com.

Photo: Sasha Arutyunova