Thurber Thursday: A Thurber Dog Cap; Sutton’s Daily; Chast In Florida; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

There aren’t a lot of wearables in the Spill’s archives — a Sam Cobean scarf, and just a few hats: one worn by Mischa Richter for the Arnold Newman New Yorker cartoonists group photo shoot in 1997, and this Thurber cap, bought ages ago in Columbus, Ohio at The Thurber House. I’ve always loved the simplicity of it — no need to fill the hat with running dogs. As befits Thurber’s art, less is so much more.

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Yesterday’s Daily Shouts, courtesy of the fab Ward Sutton: “Where All That Bloomberg Campaign Money Went”

Mr. Sutton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

 

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Chast In Florida

From Boca, March 4, 2020, “Roz Chast Delights, Moves Audience at Festival of the Arts”***

***A correction regarding this passage in the above piece:

She [Roz Chast] explored a bit of her glass-ceiling backstory as the only female cartoonist at the New Yorker circa 1978, when, at 23, she made a sale from her very first batch of submissions.

Nurit Karlin’s cartoons were being published at the time Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker. Ms. Karlin’s cartoons appeared in The New Yorker from 1974 through 1988.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Being right all the time, courtesy of David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998. See more of his work here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of March 2, 2020

The Cover: As mentioned last Friday, Barry Blitt‘s Bloomberg exploding cigar cover (above) was rush-released. Here’s a short piece about the cover’s subject by magazine’s art editor, Francoise Mouly.

The Cartoonists

The Cartoons

A likely too-deep-in-the-weeds observation: I believe (someone please correct me if I’m wrong!) this is the first issue of the magazine in contemporary times composed fully of stable mates whose entry into the stable dates back no further than the early 1990s (Frank Cotham, who began contributing in 1993 is this week’s elder, with 27 years at The New Yorker). On the flip side, you might recall that the last issue of the magazine (the 95th anniversary issue) contained a drawing by Edward Koren, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. A deep (cartoonist) bench remains at The New Yorker.

Here’s the rundown of this week’s cartoonists, in order of their freshman year:

Frank Cotham (1993); William Haefeli (1998); David Sipress (1998); Joe Dator (2006); Julia Suits (2006); Emily Flake (2008); Amy Hwang (2010); Liana Finck (2013); Lars Kenseth (2016); Maggie Larson (2017); Liz Montague (2019).

Two cartoons in the issue that caught my attention both feature non-humans. David Sipress‘s stand-up kitty, and Joe Dator‘s opposum/possum. Also noted: Ed Steed‘s (sort’ve Ben Shahn-esque) full page illustration for Adam Levin’s fiction piece.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Read about Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead,shown directly below.  Below it is the redrawn version plugged-in Spring of 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Article Of Interest: Sipress’s Appropriated Cartoon

A weekly time-out with something Thurber.

In this first installment of Thurber Thursday I thought I’d show my copy of Burton Bernstein’s Thurber: A Biography. It’s in rough shape now, as you can see; I bought it new in 1975, the year it was published. I was in college, in the beginning years of being totally gaga about everything Thurber, everything New Yorker. The publication of Mr. Bernstein’s book was a dream come true. It is, with the exception of Thurber’s own Thurber Carnival (known around here as “the bible”) the book I’ve re-read the most. When I finally met Mr. Bernstein a few years ago, I was so pleased to be able to tell him what his book meant and still means to me.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon 

Ivan Ehlers on politics getting us down.

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Article Of Interest: Sipress’s Appropriated Cartoon

A post from artnet about David Sipress’s recent newyorker.com piece, “Stop Thief! My Cartoon Gets Appropriated” — Mr. Sipress began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

 

Hokinson Covers The Stage, Again; “Stop Thief!” David Sipress’s 2006 New Yorker Cartoon Appropriated; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

The other day I posted three Helen Hokinson covers for The Stage.  Courtesy of collector extraordinaire, Warren Bernard, I’m now posting a fourth. How many more are out there?

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s Spill entry:

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois,1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

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“Stop Thief!” David Sipress’s 2006 New Yorker Cartoon Appropriated

From The New Yorker‘s online Culture Desk, February 4, 2020, “Stop Thief! My Cartoon Gets Appropriated”  — this piece, by David Sipress, on the appropriation of his above 2006 New Yorker  cartoon.

Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon  (And Yesterday’s)

Christopher Weyant on tonight’s State Of The Union address. Mr. Weyant has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

Visit his website here.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon: a splashy post-Super Bowl drawing by Trevor Spaulding, who began contributing to The New Yorker in April of 2014.  Visit his website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 3, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: a snowy bridge. Read the Q&A with the cover artist here, and see the pretty digital snowflakes fall.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

In a throw back to earlier Monday Tilley Watches, I’ll take a quick tour through all the cartoons in the issue; a mostly text-driven drive-by of the work.

The first drawing, by David Sipress, references the recent demise of Mr. Peanut (is he really gone, or was it just a dream?). The topic of the late legume was recently covered here.

…Julia Suits’s pirate in cargo shorts on a gangplank is next (cannot see cargo shorts/pants on a New Yorker cartoon character without thinking of the below cargo pants drawing by the late great Leo Cullum — it appeared in The New Yorker,  August 17, 1998:

…The third cartoon (oh, alright: drawing) in the issue belongs to Barbara Smaller, who’s been contributing to the magazine since 1996.  A bedroom, a married couple, and a reasonable question.

…next is a Zach Kanin poker game (assuming it’s poker — I see chips on the table). I really like the three card players Mr. Kanin has drawn. The fellow to the left looks a little like Ernest Borgnine (with a pinch of Broderick Crawford tossed in?):

To me, the guy on the far right resembles Mandy Patinkin.

…next up: Liana Finck on an age-old flooring concern. Nice floating ghost.

…Harry Bliss and one of his collaborators (Steve Martin) address a potential problem for passengers on one of those floating mini-cities sailing the seven seas.

…five pages later: an Emily Flake drawing far far removed from her usual style and cartoon concerns. Think Hindenburg disaster mashed with social media done in a sort of Stuart Leeds style.

…on page 45, a Tersa Burns Parkhurst retirement party. Dunno why but the cartoon reminds me of MAD magazine’s Dave Berg’s “Lighter Side Of…” drawings (that’s a good thing!).

…on page 43 is a drawing by Mick Stevens, one of the most veteran artists in this issue.  He began contributing in December of 1979 (Roz Chast in this issue with a full page color Sketchbook, beats him out by more than a year– her first drawing appeared in June of 1978).  I wonder if the male dancing bird in Mr. Stevens’s drawing was originally in color. Either way (color, or b&w), a fab cartoon.

…David Borchart’s auto rental drawing (page 43) gets a Spill gold star for the use of the word “rassle.” Zeke, the fellow that’s prepared to rassle, is also mighty terrific.

…On page 54 is an Ed Steed drawing that at first glance reminds me of Zach Kanin’s in this same issue, but only because, in both drawings, the viewer is seeing a table front and center and from near precisely the same angle. Instead of card players (as seen in Mr. Kanin’s drawing) we have animated garden utensils and tools. They’re plotting something.

…next up is a Robert Leighton drawing of mountain climbers.  I love how Mr. Leighton has immediately tossed us into a situation that would normally demand the best possible equipment available. You gotta feel for the climber who came unprepared.

…Thoroughly enjoyed  — as usual with Lars Kenseth’s work — his drawing of campers situated down on the ground, and in much nicer weather than Mr. Leighton’s. Look at the care he took in adding the reflection of the moon on the lake.

…next up is a three panel hat x-ray drawing by Liza Donnelly ( who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982). This drawing answers the oft-asked question of what could possibly occupy all that beanie air space. Love the kitty!

Lastly, Adam Douglas Thompson (the most junior artist in this issue — his first drawing appeared in The New Yorker in the issue of April 8, 2019) gives us a sort of contemporary Chon Day drawing (it’s on page 68). “Sort of” because Mr. Thompson’s line and Mr. Day’s line have different flows.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

This man (Rea Irvin) is wondering what happened to his beautiful Talk masthead design (shown below). You know — the one that appeared in The New Yorker for 92 years, not the re-draw that’s been around since May of 2017.  Who took the iconic masthead away, and why, and where oh where can it be? Actually, the answer to the first question is easy. Perhaps the last question is easy as well.  It likely resides in a file on a desktop, easily accessed. The question of why is the puzzler. Read more about its disappearance here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Daily Cartoon: by Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016.

…and a Daily Shouts by J. A. K., who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.