The Weekend Spill: More And More MAD; Photo: Chatfield At A Snazzy Drawing Board; Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of July 22-26, 2019; A New Comics Journal Column; Interview Of Interest: Paul “How To Read Nancy” Karasik

 

More And More MAD

From The Daily Cartoonist, July 27, 2019,  “We’re All MAD Here  (Paeans To The Magazine)”

D.D. Degg gathers cartoonist MAD pieces.

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Chatfield At A Snazzy Drawing Board

Courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole, this photo of Jason Chatfield at a drawing board at Dick Blick Art Supplies* last Thursday.

Mr. Chatfield began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

His website here.

*this isn’t a Spill commercial endorsement.

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A weekend roundup of the New Yorker cartoonists whose work appeared on newyorker.com‘s Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

Daily Cartoon contributors this week: J.A.K., David Sipress, Barry Blitt, Ellis Rosen, and Brendan Loper.

Daily Shouts contributors this week: Roz Chast (in her recurring Cut & Paste series), Farley Katz (in his recurring Cooking Cartoonist series), and Julia Wertz.

See all of the above, and more, here.

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A New Comics Journal Column/Columnist

There’s almost nothing the Spill likes more than a site that leads to other sites — and now there’s a new one.  From The Comics Journal, July 26, 2019, “You Build Walls, We’re Gonna Probably Dig Holes (This Week’s Links)”this new column of “links relating…to comics” by Ryan Flanders, who told us in his recent TCJ article about MAD, that he “was a member of the MAD Art Department, though my roles spilled into editorial, talent scouting and the amorphous responsibility of ‘coming up with new ideas.'”  You’ll find a sprinkle or two of New Yorker cartoonists mentioned in this first column.

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Interview Of Interest: Paul “How To Read Nancy” Karasik

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From The LA Review of Books, July 27, 2019, “It Takes A Deep Reading. and an Obsession: An Interview With Paul Karasik.”

Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

 

A Virgil Partch Bonanza Via Dick Buchanan; The New Yorker:”A World Without MAD Magazine”; A Daily Bonus And Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Virgil Partch Bonanza

Dick Buchanan has dug into his voluminous files for a whole lot of Virgil Partch. Mr. Partch’s cartoons  (he signed his work “VIP”) appeared in The New Yorker just a half dozen times, but could be found in many of the major (and some of the minor) magazines of his day . Mr. Buchanan gives us a wonderful four-part survey via Mike Lynch’s blog.

Above: From Liberty March 4, 1944, courtesy of Mr. Buchanan’s files

Below, his Spill A-Z entry

Virgil Partch (VIP)  Born, St. Paul Island, Alaska, 1917; died in a car crash on Interstate 5, north of Los Angeles. California, August 1984. New Yorker work: six drawings, beginning in November 21, 1942. His last appeared May 3, 1976.

 

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The New Yorker: “A World Without MAD Magazine”

 

The New Yorker has weighed in on the demise of MAD.  Read Jordan Orlando’s Culture Desk piece, “A World Without MAD Magazine” here.

Pictured: The Spill‘s all-too-slim collection of MADs, running from 1960 – 1981.

 

 

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A Bonus Daily from Barry Blitt…And Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mr. Mueller at home. Barry Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1993. Visit his website here.

And today’s Daily: More Mueller from David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 1, 2019; Talk Of Interest: Dana Fradon; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Sipress

The Cover: Summertime is very much here. I confess to being puzzled by the columns on this new cover but figured all would be revealed if I went to the now-standard Q&A with the cover artist (and all was). I guess I need to spend more time in Brooklyn. 

The Cartoonists

Last week I mentioned a collaborative cartoon effort; this week there are two sets: Pia Guerra & Ian Boothby, and, Seth Roberts & Brian Hawes. 3/4ths of the collaborators are making their cartoon-connected print debut (everyone but Pia Guerra, who has been contributing since 2017).  If we accept that each team contains at least one artist (i.e. someone had to draw the cartoon), then there is at least one new name to add to the newbie list. The addition of one new cartoonist from the group brings us to the 17th new cartoonist of the year (I’ll sort out who is who eventually).

But wait! Emily Bernstein is also making her debut in the print magazine, so just-like-that we’re now up to 18 new cartoonists added this year.  18 newbies this year, and 44 newbies in all under Emma Allen’s watch as cartoon editor (she began in May of 2017).

The Cartoons

 There are two kinds of cartoons that have always fascinated me. One is the drawing I linger over because I’m not at all enjoying that moment from the cartoonist’s world. The other kind is the drawing I linger over because I’m thoroughly enjoying that moment from the cartoonist’s world,  wanting to hang out with it, explore it, and learn from it. The best cartoons are shorthand graphic short stories. P.C. Vey‘s death on the beach drawing (p.18) is solidly the latter kind — a wonderful addition to the magazine’s archive of beach cartoons. It’s a drawing where everything works.

Also working is Liana Finck‘s one-two punch take on the devil and angel on one’s shoulders scenario (p. 24). I found myself studying the framework around the character — an unusual blending of box and body.

The Felipe Galindo drawing on page 70 is a fun twist on the lion tamer scenario crossed with the small but growing canon of cat scratch cartoons (a personal cat scratch favorite is this Mike Twohy classic from June 5, 1995). 

The Caption Contest Cartoonist: Liza Donnelly

Rea Irvin’s Talk Masthead

Still in storage: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead design, replaced in Spring of 2017 by a redraw(!). Below is Mr. Irvin’s drawing for those who don’t know what they’re missing, and for those who do know what they’re missing.

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Talk Of Interest: Dana Fradon

A New Yorker Cartoonist Mt. Rushmore:  From left to right: Charles Saxon, Former New Yorker Art Editor, James Geraghty, Dana Fradon, and Whitney Darrow, Jr.. Westport, Connecticut, 1982. Courtesy of Mr. Geraghty’s daughter, Sarah Geraghty Herndon).

Mr. Fradon, the subject of a lengthy Spill piece in 2013, will speak this Fall at Western Connecticut State University.  Here’s a chance to see one of the cartoon gods of The New Yorker‘s golden era.  Everything you need to know about the event here.

Mr. Fradon’s entry on the A-Z:

 

Dana Fradon Born, Chicago, Illinois, 1922. Studied at the Art Institute of Chicago prior to service in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Following his service, he attended the Art Students League of New York, New Yorker work: May 1, 1948 – . Collection: Insincerely Yours (Scribners, 1978).

 — My thanks to Warren Bernard for bringing Mr. Fradon’s event to the Spill’s attention.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

A Trump cartoon by David Sipress, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

Travels With Walter Groovy: Joe Dator & Friend In Japan; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Sipress

Joe Dator, fresh off his win at the NCSFest (he won in the category of Best In Gag Cartoons), headed to Japan with his traveling companion, Walter Groovy.  I asked Mr. Dator to talk a little about Mr. Groovy:

Well, he’s the doughy balding middle aged man who shows up in my cartoons quite a bit, enough so that I gave him a name. I took him to Australia in 2017, he was with me at the Reuben Awards in CA last week, and I’m probably taking him with me to Italy later this year. 

Mr. Dator added: “If he looks a little different, it’s because he’s a special version I dubbed “Konnichi-Groovy.'”

Above: Konnichi-Groovy and Mr. Dator — on the right, Mr. Dator with Mr. Groovy at the NCSFest

Mr. Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006.  Visit his website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon/Cartoonist

Politics and UFOs, courtesy of David Sipress, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

 

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings; The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019; Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings

Peter Steiner, a person who wears many hats (cartoonist, novelist, teacher, painter) will show recent paintings at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon in June.  All the info here (including an expanded bio). 

Mr. Steiner began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1979. His 1993 drawing“On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is one of the magazine’s most reprinted cartoons in its history. 

Mr. Steiner’s next book, The Good Cop, will be out this November.

Visit his website here.

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019

A weekly round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, John Cuneo, Lila Ash, David Sipress, and Adam Douglas Thompson.

Daily Shouts: Ellie Black, Jeremy Nguyen (with Irving Ruan), Caitlin Cass, Ali Fitzgerald, and Roz Chast.

To see all the above, and more, link here.

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Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

The cartoonist Seth Fleishman, is, along with John O’Brien, one of The New Yorker‘s few steady practitioners of the captionless cartoon (a far more difficult form, I’ve always believed, than the captioned cartoon).  Mr. Fleishman and Mr. O’Brien have done wonders with captionless cartoons in recent times.  

When Mr. Fleishman learned of the passing of Nurit Karlin, an earlier master whose entire New Yorker run of cartoons was, by far, captionless, he sent along this photo of himself,  sans text.