The Weekend Spill: The Tilley Watch Online, May 18-22, 2020; A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931; Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads; Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

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The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 18-22, 2020

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Jeremy Nguyen, David Sipress, Paul Noth, Ellis Rosen, Ali Solomon

Daily Shouts: Jason Chatfield (& Ethan Hall)

…and:

From the Culture Desk: Emily Flake’s “My Stupid Quarantine Body”

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Up and Inside”  & “Theatre Of The Absurd”

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A New Yorker State Of Mind Goes Deep Into The Issue Of May 2, 1931

One of the Spill‘s fave sites really goes to town with this particular installment. If you want to be carried away from 2020 for a bit, take a look.

Cover by Theodore Haupt, one of forty-four for the magazine.

As a sort of extra add-on to the NYSoM’s  “Tete-a-tete” section concerning Mr. Pulitzer’s fountain, here’s an Oct. 10, 2014 Spill entry

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Attempted Bloggery Shows Us Peter Arno’s Alemite Ads

Here’s a fun post from another Spill fave blog.  Attempted Bloggery looks at the Peter Arno Alemite campaign. See it all here.

[and wow! — just look at Arno’s composition in the ad shown above]

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Some Content Released For The Upcoming Cartoon Collection “All’s Fair In Love & War”

If you check out Amazon’s listing for the Bob Eckstein edited All’s Fair In Love & War (Princeton Architectural Press), you’ll be able to see 21 of the collected cartoons if you click on “Look Inside” and an additional 18 (with some duplications from “Look Inside”) if you click on the  array  of thumbnail cartoons shown below the cover.

Also shown on “Look Inside” is Mr. Eckstein’s introduction and the complete list of contributors. The book, the third in the Ultimate Cartoon Book series, comes out October 20th of this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday: The Thurber Carnival Original Broadway Cast Soundtrack; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

When I first began collecting just about anything with Thurber’s name and/or drawings, coming across the above vinyl album was a big big deal. Not just because it’s a very fun “objet d’Thurber,” but the design delivers more than your typical soundtrack album: when you open the gatefold sleeve you find Thurber’s The Last Flower in its entirety.

The inner front and inner back covers are also well-designed.  If you’re a Thurber fan, you get your money’s worth.

The soundtrack, released in 1960, came out of the successful Broadway review, which came out of Thurber’s successful book, originally published in 1945.

The Last Flower  was published in 1939. According to Thurber’s second wife, Helen, it was her husband’s favorite of his own books (and E.B. White’s favorite Thurber book). Thurber famously claimed to have “finished” The Last Flower in an hour, following dinner at The Algonquin, adding “it took some three hours of course, to ink these drawings in.”*

 

Around here, in Spill headquarters, The Thurber Carnival (book) is referred to as “The Bible.” If I had to be marooned on a desert island, this is the book I’d want with me.

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Thurber  Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

*According to Thurber’s second wife….and “It took some three hours…” From Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life And Times, p. 737.

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David Sipress on what one royal likes.

Mr. Sipress has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1998.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.); The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of May 11-15, 2020; Joe Dator’s Animation

 

From The Spill’s Library: A Look At New Yorker Biographies (Etc.)

If you’ve been spending as much time as I have online, you’ve seen multiple postings by individuals of their personal library (or parts of). Since visiting my fave bookstore is out of the question for now, I’ve found  browsing book collections by others a ton ‘o fun.  I’ve seen a number of (possible) must-have books over the past few weeks — books I didn’t know existed, or books I’d forgotten about. Over the years, I’ve done a few posts on what’s on the Spill’s shelves. Thurber biographies most recently, and not too long ago, a few of Thurber’s books here at Spill headquarters.

Below you’ll see another group that is ordered by subject (the subjects being folks who were or are New Yorker contributors).  This group of books is an arm’s length from where I sit; I like being able to lean back in my office chair and grab a needed title. I’ve included the whole of the Spill‘s E.B  White collection (mostly books by him, and the great White bio by Scott Elledge) because much of his work seems (to me) to fit into autobiography. The A-Z section begins just to the right of Katharine White’s Onward And Upward in the Garden with Renata Adler’s Gone. Not everything New Yorker contributor/autobiographical/biographical is shown here. Books by the subjects (that is, books by New Yorker contributors) are on the other side of my desk — not arm’s length, but close enough. There’s plenty of autobiographical material in many of them (the Updike and Roth books alone take up a couple of shelves). There are also books that haven’t yet found a shelf (I need to build more). But the ones shown here are the core — the go-to books that help me determine what was what and who was who at The New Yorker.

The Ross section includes a title that might cause some head-scratching: Good Food For Bad Stomachs by Sara M. Jordan, M.D. & Sheila Hibben. It’s there because the (4 page)  Introduction was written by Harold Ross.

 

 

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The Tilley Watch Online, May 11-15, 2020

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Colin Tom, Tom Toro, Lars Kenseth, David Sipress, Elisabeth McNair.

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat, Gabrielle Bell.

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Joe Dator’s Animation

The fab Joe Dator has posted a four minute animation. Mr. Dator had this to say about it on Facebook:

My quarantine project for several weeks has been writing and directing this animated short film, called “EARTH”, about an alien invasion gone wrong. I’m thrilled to finally to be able to show it to you guys!  

See it here.

Joe Dator began contributing to The New Yorker in August of 2006.  Visit his website here.

Personal History: From Zero To Sixty; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s

Personal History: From Zero To Sixty

In the summer of 1977, with college behind me and the demands of school work finally over, I was able to focus all of my attention on getting into the New Yorker — my New Yorker or Bust phase.  I’d begun sending the magazine work when I was still in high school, and then all through college, with no luck whatsoever, and an ever-increasing pile of rejected work.

For some reason, during that summer, I thought it would be smart to make a few stabs at being organized, and so I began a ledger, recording what I sent in to the magazine every week. In those days there were a bunch of other magazines buying cartoons — a ledger would help me keep track of what went where; it became routine to send my New Yorker rejects out to them (I’d somehow learned that’s what the professionals did). By mid-August I’d yet to to sell a single cartoon anywhere; I hadn’t made a penny from my work (think Beatles: Out of college, money spent, see no future, pay no rent, all the money’s gone, nowhere to go”) — even something called UFOlogy was rejecting my drawings.

Everything changed when the August 22nd batch — seventeen cartoons — was submitted to The New Yorker. That week I went from having sold zero number of drawings anywhere to any publication to having my work accepted at The New Yorker (it was a drawing of a fortune teller speaking to a customer, saying,“Nothing will ever happen to you”). As momentous a moment as that was for me — my foot finally in the door at The New Yorker! — the magazine was buying the idea (the caption) and handing it to veteran contributor Whitney Darrow, Jr. to execute. As noted in the ledger, it appeared in a December issue of the magazine — December 26th, to be exact.

By 1977, Mr. Darrow had been with the magazine 44 years. It had long been a practice at The New Yorker to supply artists in need of fresh ideas with work sent in from the outside (like me), or from other cartoonists at the magazine, or from the art department staff. There were even a few idea men contracted to do nothing but think up ideas for the artists.

I knew nothing about that system when the fortune teller cartoon made it through The New Yorker‘s editorial hurdles and was bought. I received a check for $150.00 — the first time I was paid for what I wanted to do for a living. When I look at the list shown above it’s a little frightening how empty the page is — all those empty squares, all those rejected drawings. Only two other sales on the page: both New Yorker rejects from that same August 22nd batch: one to Dawn Dusk magazine, and the other to the about-to-be-refurbished Esquire magazine (Esquire never ran that drawing or others of mine it later purchased — they changed course on running cartoons before the maiden issue under Clay Felker appeared on newsstands).

As summer turned to winter, my initial luck with The New Yorker seemed to have run out. Weeks and then months of empty ledger boxes. In early 1978, justlikethat, The New Yorker bought another from me (this time the drawing they published was mine). Oddly, I abandoned the weekly ledger just before that second drawing was taken. I think all those empty boxes were beginning to get to me.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Sipress on dinosaurs and stress. Mr. Sipress began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

And Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Elisabreth McNair on when it’s safe to go out again.

Ms. McNair began contributing to The New yorker in July of 2018.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 18, 2020

The Cover: a sign o’ the times graduation piece by Anita Kunz. This is the tenth out the last eleven covers that is coronavirus-related.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An even dozen cartoons & cartoonists, with a thirteenth, Ed Steed, as this week’s Spot drawing artist. The newbie in the crowd, Oren Bernstein, is the sixth new New Yorker cartoonist of 2020, and the fifty-ninth new addition to the stable since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

Some fleeting thoughts on a few of this week’s drawings:

…The aforementioned newbie’s drawing style looks to be in the school of John O’Brien (although this drawing carries a caption; Mr. O’Brien is one of the masters of the captionless cartoon).

…I was hoping to see a horse in Roz Chast’s ranch drawing, but alas! (I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s horse drawings).

…two drawings, two very different styles, caught my eye: Mitra Farmand’s cats in bags (p.62)… and Liana Finck’s moonbeam in a jar (p. 40).

…Emily Bernstein’s racoon drawing caption is swell & funny.

…the rhythm of the wording in the boxed title of Maddie Dai’s gameboard drawing (p.37) vaguely echoed (for me) the wording in John Held, Jr.’s New Yorker work (with maybe a dash of Glen Baxter tossed in).

…I like seeing the George Boothian rug in Frank Cotham’s cartoon (p. 44). When I began studying Mr. Booth’s work, I noticed how many of his carpets never quite sat completely flat on the floor. I found this touch of reality (just one of many in Mr. Booth’s work) inspirational. Example (in this May 25, 1998 New Yorker drawing):

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch

The above iconic design by the great Rea Irvin was ditched in the Spring of 2017 in favor a redrawn(!) version. Hopefully, one day, someday, the above will return. Read all about it here.