Not O.K. Wild West Edition Opens in Idaho

Since its inaugural opening last Fall in Brooklyn, the Not O.K. Exhibit ( consisting of cartoons rejected by The New Yorker *) traveled north to Rye, New York before heading way out west to Mackay, Idaho (shown on the map below, just to get you situated).

Below: some photos from the opening, sent this way by New Yorker cartoonist,  Jeremy Nguyen (shown above on the right under the marquee), who flew out to join opening night festivities with fellow New Yorker cartoonist, Navied Mahdavian, curator of this western edition of the exhibit. He’s the fellow above on the left under the marquee. It should be noted that David Ostow conceived of and curated the original Not O.K. exhibit.

More info / more reading:

*Here’s an explanation of what an O.K. is:

In the New Yorker‘s weekly art meeting, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick, and the magazine’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, look over and discuss submitted drawings. Mr. Remnick, as the magazine’s editor-in-chief, has the final say on whether a drawing is O.K.ed or rejected. Getting an “O.K.” from the New Yorker (usually via email from Ms. Allen) means that The New Yorker has bought one of your submitted cartoons.

“The New Yorker Said No, But These Cartoons Just May Make Your Day”The New York Times, September 21, 2017.

“Pictures At An Exhibition”Ink Spill, September 23, 2017.

“Rejected Cartoons Get A Second Chance”The Rye City Review, January 25, 2018.

“Not OK: Wild West Edition Brings Failed New Yorker Cartoons To Rural Idaho”Idaho State Journal, August 23, 2018.

An Overflow Crowd at the Society of Illustrators Event: Funny Ladies at The New Yorker: Then and Now

Some of the cartoonists in the exhibit, left to right: Sharon Levy, Roz Chast, Liza Donnelly, Carolita Johnson, Liana Finck, Emily Sanders Hopkins (nee Richards), Sophia Warren, Mary Lawton, and Maggie Larson

A Packed House and Then Some

Last night’s event, “Funny Ladies at The New Yorker: Then and Now” was most decidedly An Event. Before the panel discussion began an announcement was made that the crowd in attendance had reached capacity; outside on West 63rd Street, the line of people still waiting to get in stretched east to the corner of Lexington Avenue. We heard from a source that the only event rivaling this one in attendance was the Spiderman opening at the Society in June of 2017.  The Funny Ladies exhibit itself is, as we’ve been saying throughout the week, a must-see.

(Above: standing, l-r: Carolita Johnson (holding Hammy), Emma Allen, Roz Chast. Seated, l-r: Liana Finck, Liza Donnelly) — this photo and the group shot of cartoonists courtesy of Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery. Mr. Nadler was the Spill‘s official photographer for the evening.  My thanks to him.

The crowd was treated to a lively, often hilarious discussion between the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, and cartoonists Roz Chast, Carolita Johnson (who held her dog, Hammy, on her lap), Liana Finck, and Liza Donnelly.  Ms. Donnelly curated the exhibit, and moderated.  Link here to a recording of the event.

Among the artists spotted in the crowd: George Booth, David Borchart, Bishakh Som, Ellis Rosen, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Maddie Dai, Amy Hwang, Maria Scrivan, Tom Bloom, Karen Sneider, Tim Hamilton, Jeremy Nguyen, Marisa Acocella, Sara Lautman, Sam Marlow, Isabella Bannerman, Flash Rosenberg, Emma Hunsinger, Neil Dvorak, Jenny Kroik and Gayle Kabaker.  Also spotted: The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick.

 

 

 

Robert Grossman, Illustrator, Cartoonist Extraordinaire: 1940-2018; The Tilley Watch Online

Robert Grossman, Illustrator, Cartoonist Extraordinaire, 1940 – 2018

  Robert Grossman a multi-talented artist with an instantly recognizable style, has passed away. Mr. Grossman enjoyed a spectacular career as an illustrator and cartoonist with his work appearing on the cover of numerous major publications. For far more information please go to Drew Friedman’s 2013 piece about Mr. Grossman’s career. 

In the early 1960s Mr. Grossman worked briefly as an assistant to the New Yorker‘s Art Editor, James Geraghty. He contributed two cartoons in the Geraghty years: January 13, 1962 (seen above) and December 14, 1963. His work returned to the magazine in the Tina Brown years in the form of six comic strips; his last contribution ran under David Remnick’s editorship.

( Mr. Grossman’s Yale Record parody cover of the New Yorker appears at the top of this piece)

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Trumpian cartoons were in the majority again this week in the Daily Cartoon slot:  a reflection on teachers & guns-in-the-classroom by Avi Steinberg, Stormy weather by Kim Warp, March Madness by Lars Kenseth, a tribute to Stephen Hawking by David Sipress (that was a ‘bonus” Daily), Trump & school walkouts was a team effort by Jason Chatfield and Scott Dooley.  The week ended with Ellis Rosen‘s nod to the nationwide closing of the Toys r Us chain. 

Contributing cartoonists appearing on Daily Shouts: Emma Hunsinger, Will McPhail, and Ben Schwartz.

All the work (and more) can be seen here.

A Visit to “Jim’s Bench”; Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Tilley Watch Online; Live New Yorker Cartoons Part VI on Late Night with Seth Meyers

A Visit to “Jim’s Bench”

The filmmaker Sally Williams recently asked me if I’d like to meet with her at “Jim’s bench” on Central Park West and 77th Street, right across the street from the Museum of Natural History. I couldn’t possibly resist the invitation. Ms. Williams has been working on a documentary about James Stevenson for quite some time now; we’ve had numerous conversations over the years about Mr. Stevenson and, of course, The New Yorker. 

 Mr. Stevenson is on a long list of New Yorker cartoonists who have lived and worked in New York City (some still do) and whose work reflected their city. I think also of Steinberg and Alan Dunn as cases in point.

Sitting on this bench near where Mr. Stevenson lived I couldn’t help but imagine him experiencing the traffic, the sounds, sights, types of individuals bicycling by, walking by, running by; the dogs and dog-walkers, the flurry of activity at the museum. I could see it all in Stevenson’s style: gracefully casual, with spark. Ms. Williams confirmed that Mr. Stevenson was, like so many cartoonists, a watcher (I once likened cartoonists to sponges. Consciously or subconsciously, we take everything in).  

If you find yourself near the Museum of Natural History, you might want to take a seat on Jim’s bench and spend a few moments watching Manhattan go by, Stevenson-style. 

  The bench is the one closest to the Humboldt StatueIt bears a small plaque:

 (I’ve written about Mr. Stevenson here on the Spill a number of times.  Here’s one piece which might be of interest). 

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

Messrs. Max and Simon are back with thoughts & ratings on work by Frank Cotham, Carolita Johnson, Drew Dernavich, Avi Steinberg, Emily Flake, Roz Chast, Olivia de Recat, Mike Twohy, Bob Eckstein, Edward Koren, and Darrin Bell.  Read it here!

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Daily Cartoons this week by: Paul Noth, Mary Lawton, Kim Warp, David Sipress, and Lars Kenseth (4/5ths of the drawings were Trumpian).

And the contributing New Yorker cartoonists on Daily Shouts:  P.C. Vey, Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Liana Finck, Emily Flake, and JAK (with Hartley Lin).  

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Live New Yorker Cartoons Part VI on Late Night with Seth Meyers

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick returns to Late Night with Seth Meyers in the best segment yet. Cartoons by Carolita Johnson, Charlie Hankin, Will McPhail, Maddie Dai, and Ellis Rosen brought to life.   See them here!