The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker, October 14, 2019

The Cover: Ed Steed returns with his second New Yorker cover, and like his first (August 26th of this year) it’s a winner.  Read the magazine’s Q&A with Mr. Steed about his cover here.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

A number of drawings of special note in this issue:

A fab mouse drawing (it’s on page 30) by the great Sam Gross.  As noted here recently, Mr. Gross is now in his 50th year of contributing to The New Yorker.

Sara Lautman’s “…accompanied” drawing (p. 43) is a fine fun drawing — delivered in a style unlike any other in the magazine’s stable.

Lars Kenseth’s astronauts drawing (p. 58). I’ll just say it:  Mr. Kenseth’s drawing made me laugh out loud.

Sofia Warren’s Charles Addamsy drawing (p. 63).  A good deal of information to absorb, well-handled.

Glen Baxter’s lion in a museum (p. 48). I’m a sucker for (what seem like) bolt-of-lightning drawings. By that I mean drawings that seem instantaneously transferred to us from the artist without labor (Jack Ziegler was a master of the form). I could be completely wrong: perhaps Mr. Baxter spent hours and days developing this particular cartoon. It’s become a favorite Baxter drawing.

David Borchart’s drawing (p.44) is a fine addition to the magazine’s desert island canon. May desert island drawings never end.

From one who loves castles (and drawing them), nice to see Jeremy Nguyen’s different take (p.25).

A newbie in this issue: Yael Green makes her debut appearance (p.74). Ms. Green is the 23rd new cartoonist brought into the fold this year, and the 49th since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Here’s Mr. Irvin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Rea Irvin  Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

The classic Talk masthead by Mr Irvin that ran for 92 consecutive years  is shown above. It was replaced by a redraw (!) in the Spring of 2017. It’s never too late to bring it back.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 16, 2019

The Cover: Ivan Brunetti returns with a cat person/dog person cover. Read here what he had to say about the cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

I spend the wee hours of every Monday morning looking through the latest issue of The New Yorker (it’s posted online at around 4am). I look at every cartoon at least twice, then I close my laptop and think about the cartoons I just saw. The ones that stick with me — the ones I think about the most, are the ones noted here on The Monday Tilley Watch.  And so it is this week with these four (in no particular order):

Liana Finck’s (p. 40) umbrella drawing grabbed me immediately. It reminded me of an early New Yorker drawing by her published in 2014 (she began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013) titled Snow Falling On Accountants (I liked that one so much it’s now part of the Spill‘s collection of originals). The drawing has a 1970/1980s-era William Stieg-ian quality to it.

Roz Chast’s Wizard of Oz drawing (p. 54). I’m a fan of Ms. Chast’s outdoorsy drawings (like this one for instance).  I associate Oz with spectacular color (the film is black & white til Dorothy lands in Oz and opens up the door of her farmhouse). We’ve all seen enough of Ms. Chast’s terrif color work so that I can (possibly) be forgiven for imagining this drawing colorized.

The lead off drawing in the issue is by Adam Douglas Thompson. I like the simplicity of this cartoon — the way Mr. Thompson’s shown us exactly what we need to see, and no more.  Rats (and mice) have a long New Yorker cartoon history (here’s a favorite Sam Gross drawing from 1999).

David Borchart’s end of summer drawing (p. 39) is quite fab. Mr. Borchart, as he usually does in his work, gives us a world to think about. And, of course, the drawing itself is spectacular (note how the ferry leaves a wake).

Cartoon placement/sizing: All of the cartoons in this issue have been given good breathing room. A few examples: William Haefeli’s (p.31), Sharon Levy’s (p.59), and Lars Kenseth’s (p.22).

Rea Irvin’s Lost Masthead: Gone since the Spring of 2017, but not forgotten here.

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; New Market Watch…Air Mail; Donnelly Live-Draws Dem’s Debate; A Susanne Suba Re-Issue

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Desert drinks by Lila Ash, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018.

__________________________________________________________________

New Market Watch

Considering the narrowing avenues for cartoonists , it’s always a brighter day when a cartoon-carrying publication is launched.  We now have two (online-only) issues of former Vanity Fair editor, Graydon Carter’s Air Mail to peruse. You’ll find cartoons under the heading “Small Talk” (not an exclusive-to-cartoons-heading). Many, if not all of the cartoonists in these first two issues seem to have caravanned over from the recently de-cartooned Esquire, where Air Mail‘s cartoon editor was formerly (and briefly) the cartoon editor.  New Yorker readers will recognize most of Air Mail‘s cartoonists appearing in these first two issues; they include Alex Gregory, Maddie Dai, Joe Dator, Drew Dernavich, Chris Weyant, Seth Fleishman, David Borchart, and Charlie Hankin.

Two other New Yorker artists (primarily contributors of New Yorker covers ) are given their own “Sketchbook” slots: Barry Blitt, and the legendary Edward Sorel (casually referred to under the heading, “Ed Sorel’s Sketchbook”).

The one nit-picky thing I’ll say about Air Mail‘s cartoon slot is that I wish the space allotted each cartoon wasn’t so compressed (the bright red Small Talk banner actually looks to be weighing down on a number of the cartoons,  invading the cartoon’s space).  I’ve always believed cartoons are better off with breathing room surrounding them (i.e., shown graphic respect).  You’ll notice that a number of text features ( Science, Tech Lab, But First…, Highlight, Crime) all have a horizontal line placed below their heading, cleanly separating the feature’s title from the article.

___________________________________________________________________

Liza Donnelly Live-Draws Dem’s Debate

Check out Liza Donnelly’s graphic take on last night’s debate. 

Ms. Donnelly has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1982.

_________________________________________________

A Susanne Suba Re-Issue

Originally published in 1951 by Rand McNally (cover on the left), The Theatre Cat by Noel Streatfeild, with illustrations by New Yorker artist Susanne Suba will be re-issued this September by Scholastic. 

Susanne Suba’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born Budapest, Hungary 1913. Died February, 2012, NYC. Ms. Suba contributed numerous “spot” drawings to The New Yorker, as well as five covers and one cartoon, published September 18, 1948. Her first cover appeared October 21, 1939, and her last, March 2, 1963. Besides her work for the magazine she was a prolific illustrator of children’s books. A collection of her spot drawings was published in 1944, Spots By Suba: From The New Yorker (E.P. Dutton & Co., Inc, NY).

Link to the Spill‘s appreciation of Ms. Suba here.

 

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist: David Borchart; Today’s Daily Shoutist: Tom Chitty

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

David Borchart delivers a neglectful infrastructure drawing (the drawing is anything but  neglectful).  Mr. Borchart began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. See some of his New Yorker work here on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

______________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts…

Tom Chitty lists some “Things You Can Take With You”.

Mr. Chitty began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit his website here.

Cover Revealed For “Everyone’s A Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book”; Fave Photo Of The Day: Eckstein, Downes, Borchart; Flake’s Hug Book; Shannon Wheeler’s “Why Did We Trust Him?”; Moment Magazine’s “Have I Got A Cartoon For You!”; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: J.A.K.

The second in a series (the first: The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons), Everyone’s A Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book, edited by Bob Eckstein, published by Princeton Architectural Press, will be available October 22nd.

From the publisher: We are all critics now. From social media “likes” to reviews on Yelp and Rotten Tomatoes, we’re constantly asked to give our opinion and offer feedback. Everyone’s a Critic is a curated collection of the best and brightest New Yorker cartoonists celebrating the art of the drawn critique, whether about restaurants, art, sports, dates, friends, or modern life. Featuring the work of thirty-six masters of the cartoon, including Roz Chast, Sam Gross, Nick Downes, Liza Donnelly, Bob Mankoff, Michael Maslin, and Mick Stevens, over half the cartoons in this book appear in print for the first time.

(Cover drawing by Danny Shanahan).

_________________

Fave Photo Of The Day: Eckstein, Downes, and Borchart

From last night’s event at Word Bookstore for The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons. Seated, l-r, Bob Eckstein, Nick Downes, and David Borchart.

_____________________________________________________

Flake’s Hug Book

Emily Flake’s next book, That Was Awkward: The Art and Etiquette of the Awkward Hug  is due October 15 from Viking.

From the publisher: Emily Flake–keen observer of human behavior and life’s less-than-triumphant moments–codifies the most common awkward hugs that have plagued us all (sadly, multiple times).

Ms. Flake began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.  Visit her website here.

 

__________________________________________________

Shannon Wheeler’s “Why Did We Trust Him?”

Shannon Wheeler’s latest, from Top Shelf Productions, Why Did We Trust Him? is due out August 20th.

From the publisher: Shannon Wheeler unloads a new set of top notch cartoons in this premium collection… Wheeler demonstrates what won him a couple of Eisner Awards with a more personal set of single panel comics. Relationships, social norms, cats, dogs, food, and himself, are all targets of his urbane wit.

Mr. Wheeler began contributing to The New Yorker in May of 2009. Visit his website here.

________________________________________

From Moment Magazine: Have I Got A Cartoon For You!

Due October 10th, from Moment Books, edited by a former New Yorker cartoon editor (now the Esquire cartoon editor).

________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, by J.A.K. (Jason Adam Katzenstein), is Elizabeth Warren-centric. Mr. K. began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.