The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 20, 2020

A Note To Readers: Due to the times we’re in the digital edition of the magazine appears later in the day than usual. Thus, instead of the usual look through the magazine, I’m working off of the slide show of cartoons on newyorker.com, as well as the cover Q&A found there. If any mistakes are made on my part I’ll correct them once the digital issue is posted.

Update: 1:00pm.  Digital issue posted about an hour ago.

The Cover: Owen Smith gives us a tired worker (the piece is titled — and again, why do we need cover titles? —  “After The Shift”)…four out of the last five covers have been corona virus themed. Read about the cover here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

I don’t know how others respond to an issue’s cartoons. For me, it’s always at least a two-level response:

1. How each drawing hits me — did a drawing stand out (for better or worse).

2. The feeling from all the drawings combined: was it a strong issue of work, or not.

This new issue feels strong, covering a wide range of territory in cartoonland, from aliens (courtesy of Charlie Hankin) to a PC Satyr (from Edward Koren), from dolphins in a swimming pool (McPhail), to what might be found on the other side of the mountaintop (Colin Tom)… and so much more.

 

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch:

Rea Irvin, the fellow shown here, did so much to shape the look of The New Yorker (okay, I’ll say it — he was instrumental). One of his greatest lasting contributions was adapting Allen Lewis’s typeface; it eventually became known as the Irvin typeface, although these days I hear it   referred to as the New Yorker typeface.  Among Irvin’s many contributions other than art supervisor to Harold Ross (in itself a huge contribution!) was contributing covers, including, of course, the very first one, featuring Eustace Tilley. He also contributed cartoons, and headings for various departments. His design for Talk Of The Town stood in place (with a few adjustments in the magazine’s earliest days) for 92 years, until May of 2017 when his iconic design was mothballed and replaced by a redraw.

Am I wrong to think of Irvin’s typeface, his Tilley, his Talk masthead, and his “catholic” taste in cartoon selection as representing the graphic soul of the magazine?  So many modern changes (or “tweaks” as they were referred to) were test ballooned in recent years and then withdrawn (layout, typography, headings, etc., etc.) —  why not bring back this not insignificant bit of soul.

 

Thurber Thursday: New Yorker Cartoonist Stamps; Article Of Interest: Steinberg; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

I came across this block of Thurber stamps while looking through a bag of materials saved from an early 1990s trip to Columbus Ohio.  Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast, Danny Shanahan and yours truly attended an exhibit of cartoons at The Thurber House and gave a talk.

It made me wonder how many other New Yorker cartoonists have been honored with their own stamp.  A quick search turned up a Leo Cullum stamp and several Charles Barsotti stamps from the UK, issued in 1996 (one of the Barsotti’s is shown here)…surely there are more.

Updated April 10th:

And surely there are more. My colleague Tom Chitty forwarded a link to more of the 1996 UK cartoon stamp series, including the one below left by Jack Ziegler, and the aforementioned Leo Cullum stamp, below right right. It is kind of funny that there has not been a New Yorker cartoonist stamp series in this country. How great it would be to have an Addams stamp, and a Steinberg, a Hokinson, a Lorenz, Modell, Stevenson, Mary Petty, Saxon, a Nurit Karlin, and on and on and on:

Update April 9th: this addition,a John Held, Jr. stamp from the 2001 American Illustrators series. Courtesy of David Petruzelli:

From the Spill’s A-Z:

John Held Jr (Photo source: Sketchbook of American Humorists, 1938) Born, January 10, 1889, Salt Lake City, Utah. Died, 1958, Belmar, New Jersey. New Yorker work: April 11, 1925 – Sept. 17, 1932.

 

 

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Article Of Interest: Steinberg

From Curbed, April 9, 2020, “Saul Steinberg celebrated the home as a ‘cacoon for creativity'”

Steinberg’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Saul Steinberg Born, June 15, 1914, Ramnic-Sarat, Rumania. Died in 1999. New Yorker work: 1941 – (The New Yorker publishes his work posthumously). Steinberg is one of the giants of The New Yorker.  Go here to visit the saulsteinbergfoundation where you’ll find  much essential information and examples of his work.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Sipress gets cartooney with a classic piece of art.

Mr. Sipress began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

Thurber Thursday: An Assortment Of Paperbacks; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Thurber Thursday

One of the best things about visiting a used book store is coming upon the unexpected. Nearly all of the above came to me that way. Of all these, my favorite cover is one of the simplest: the 1962 edition of Thurber Country, published by Penguin Books in Great Britain:

Finally, if you want a brand new Thurber book to dive into, I highly recommend Michael Rosen’s fab A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Carrot trouble by Danny Shanahan, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988.

 

 

Weekend Spill: “I Played Ping-Pong” With Thurber…The New Yorker’s Roger Angell Interview; John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin; The Tilley Watch Online: February 10-14, 2020

Interview Of Interest: Roger Angell

From The New Yorker, this terrif interview of Roger Angell by Willing Davidson, a senior editor at the magazine: “Baseball, Fiction, And Life: Roger Angell’s Era-spanning Career At The New Yorker”

Left: Mr. Angell, wearing the hat, with another New Yorker era-spanner, Edward Koren

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John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin

When I meet up with cartoonists here in the Hudson Valley it’s a rare thing for any drawing to be done. Most of the time — 99.999% of the time — is spent jabbering about all kinds of things. But — there’s always a but, right? — yesterday while sitting in a bakery/coffee joint with New Yorker colleagues, Danny Shanahan and John Cuneo, John began to describe a cover he’s working on for Michael Gerber’s fab American Bystander. As the fine tip Uniball pen often cuts to the chase quicker than the spoken word, John grabbed a napkin and within seconds ( a minute at most) drew the above. Hoarder that I am, I asked him if I could have it just as he was about to crumple it up, and then asked if he would sign it. Luckily, he was  agreeable-enough to both requests. I’ll run his sketch again side-by-side the finished piece once it appears on The American Bystander.

—My thanks to John Cuneo for sharing his napkin with the Spill. 

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The Tilley Watch Online

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features,  February 10-14, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Amy Hwang, Ivan Ehlers, Kim Warp, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash.

Daily Shouts:  Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), J.A.K. (with Harris Mayersohn),

…And:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

“Dinner Party” — A video with Marc Philippe Eskenazi, who was at one time an assistant in the cartoon department.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of January 27, 2020; David Salle Incorporates Peter Arno Drawings

The Cover: A NYC subway situation, by Luci Gutierrez.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Every first run through the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker  I feel as if I’m browsing the goods behind glass in a pastry shop’s display case, appreciating the variety, before beginning to narrow down which one to select, if in the buying mood. In this new issue, a number of pastries caught my eye. In no particular order here are some favorites.

…Sofia Warren’s four part color piece (it’s on page 36) fits nicely in the New Yorker school of cartoons that go beyond eliciting a laugh, capturing a lovely moment.  An earlier example of one of those moments is Arnie Levin’s classic multi-panel New Yorker drawing, “It’s only the wind”  from September 18, 1978 (it originally ran across the top of two facing pages, four panels to a page):

…Christopher Weyant’s  drawing on page 40, of a fellow leaving his blimp at a parking garage, is a text book example of the classic New Yorker one-two punch cartoon (as defined by Peter Arno).

…On page 22 you’ll find Danny Shanahan’s terrific drawing of cats with a tech problem.

…A perfect look on the guy’s face who’s tasting olive oil in Lars Kenseth’s cartoon (p. 42).  As mentioned on the Spill not long ago, veteran New Yorker cartoonist Henry Martin once said to me that certain cartoonists “draw funny” — it was meant as a compliment. Mr. Kenseth draws funny.

…The woman standing beside Liana Finck’s former dog walker (p.55) ever-so-slightly echoes Edward Gorey’s elongated figures. Ms. Finck’s drawings remind me, in a way, of Michael Shaw’s — the lines delivered as if direct from the muse.

…also in the issue: Insecure(?) Gods (by Hartley Lin), an update on Dolly,  the cloned sheep (Navied Mahdavian), criminals in an alleyway (Frank Cotham), a comet denier dinosaur (Jessica Olien), trash in space (Roz Chast), a couple in basement counting babysitter money (Amy Hwang), a doctor’s brainy children (Paul Noth), and a possible game changer (Liam Walsh).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  A–gasp!– redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead design has been in place since the Spring of 2017.

If granted three cartoon wishes, one of them would be the return of Mr. Irvin’s work to its home of 92 years.  Read about the switcheroo here.

The missing masthead appears below.

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David Salle Incorporates Arno Drawings

From Creative Boom, January 20, 2020, “Vibrant paintings inspired by advertising and cartoons from The New Yorker in the 1950s” — this piece on David Salle (fabulously!) incorporating  Peter Arno drawings within his paintings.

Shown above: Mr. Salle’s “A Night In The Sky With Friends”