Alan Dunn’s New Yorker Honor Roll; The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of June 1, 2020

Above: The New Yorker War Cartoons  1945 Special Edition For The Armed Forces.  For more on The New Yorker‘s special war editions go here.

The  above War Cartoons cover by Alan Dunn originally appeared on The New Yorker issue of August 11, 1945. Nearly a year later Mr. Dunn revisited the Honor Roll with this cover of July 27, 1946:

Mr. Dunn’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. NYer work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

______________________________________________________________________

The Cover:

And on into June with another cover (we are told) reflecting this strange time. You might not know this cover was presented to us as timely without knowing the title (“Lockdown Sampler”). Without the title, in a different time, we would likely see this cover, as William Steig once defined (pre-Tina Brown) New Yorker covers, as a “special moment — fleetingly observed.”

Read a short Q&A with Roz Chast here about her cover.

 

The Cartoonists:

Two duo efforts in this issue, with one duo, Sophie Lucido Johnson (and, I’m taking a guess here on this link:) Sammi Skolmoski new to the cartoonist stable. The Spill custom is to count a duo as one new entry on the A-Z, which means the Johnson/Skolmoski duo are the 9th newbies so far this year, and the 62nd newbies brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship (begun in May of 2017).

The Cartoons: a number jump out for me — five to be exact. Curiously (or not) they appear in a row, beginning with Emily Flake’s clowns about to pie throw (perhaps my favorite Flake drawing ever), followed by Lars Kenseth’s airport baggage moment, then Danny Shanahan’s fab accessorized dinosaurs, Joe Dator’s E.T. bicycle rental scenario, and finally Farley Katz’s Sunset Boulevard-ish” Instagram drawing.

See the slideshow of this week’s drawings here (if you scroll down a bit).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Regular Spill visitors will recognize that every Monday Tilley Watch ends with the Irvin Talk Masthead Watch.  Mr. Irvin’s classic design is still missing (it went away in the Spring of 2017, replaced by a…gasp!…redraw…read about it here). Here’s Mr. Irvin’s mothballed classic design:

 

 

 

 

 

The Wednesday Watch: Sam Gross Is On Facebook!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931; More Spills: Toro’s New Book; Latest Celeb Caption Contest Video

Sam Gross Is On Facebook!

The one, the only, the fabulous Sam Gross now has a Facebook page.

Mr. Gross’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Sam Gross Born 1933, Bronx, NY. New Yorker work: August 23, 1969 –. Other than his work in The New Yorker, Mr. Gross is probably best known for his work in National Lampoon. He’s edited a large number of collections, including Dogs Dogs Dogs, Cats Cats Cats, Food Food Food: A Feast of Great Cartoons (originally published as All You Can Eat: A Feast of Great Cartoons); Golf Golf Golf, Ho! Ho! Ho!, Movies Movies Movies. Key collections: I Am Blind and My Dog is Dead (Avon, 1978), An Elephant is Soft and Mushy (Avon, 1982)

______________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Lars Kenseth on being there, sort of.

Mr. Kenseth began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

__________________________________________________________________________

A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The New Yorker Issue Of April 25, 1931

As usual with this Spill fave blog, it’s always a kick looking at what was happening in the New Yorkersphere way way way back when

Gotta love the Helen Hokinson cover.

Here’s Ms. Hokinson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

Helen Hokinson  Born, Illinois, 1893; died, Washington, D.C., 1949. New Yorker work: 1925 -1949, with some work published posthumously. All of Hokinson’s collections are wonderful, but here are two favorites. Her first collection: So You’re Going To Buy A Book! (Minton, Balch & Co, 1931) and what was billed as “the final Hokinson collection”: The Hokinson Festival (Dutton & Co., 1956). According to a New Yorker document  produced during Harold Ross’s editorship (1925-1951) rating their artists, Ms. Hokinson and Peter Arno occupied a special category unto themselves above all others.

_______________________________________________________

...Tom Toro‘s first kids book is just out.  Read about it here.  Congrats,  Mr. T!

…the latest celeb New Yorker Caption Contest video has been posted. Several fun/funny captions  by Ellie Kemper & Daniel Radcliffe (the cartoons captioned are by David Borchart, Tom Cheney, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Maggie Larson, and Danny Shanahan).

 

 

 

Thurber Thursday: When Thurber’s Dr. Millmoss Returned To The New Yorker Via Danny Shanahan

I’m on record as believing Thurber’s “What have you done with Dr. Millmoss?” is a perfect drawing.  It appeared in The New Yorker,  July 14, 1934, but we didn’t get any kind of closure on Millmoss until February of 1991 when he turned up at a Returns counter in a Danny Shanahan cartoon. Two more Shanahan Thurberesque drawings over the next two years provided further glimpses of Millmoss’s world.

The Spill recently asked Mr. Shanahan about to talk about his Thurber Millmoss trio, and if the originals were, as I remembered, out in Columbus.

“I always loved the Thurber Millmoss cartoon, one of my all-time favorites. It was approaching the Christmas holiday, and gift cartoons were in my head (as were “return” cartoons). I came up with the Thurber tribute, the “return” of Millmoss, but didn’t know if it would fly with Lee [The New Yorker’s art editor, Lee Lorenz]. He loved it, The New Yorker ran it, so not long after I decided to keep it going. I came up with the second idea; once again, Lee loved it but thought it was too soon, and that maybe it would work better in The New Yorker’s anniversary issue. That’s where it ran, and the following year, as the next anniversary issue approached, I thought I should take a stab at wrapping up the whole saga. It worked out well, except for a handful of readers who thought I was trying to steal Thurber’s characters. The magazine got a few angry letters. And, yes, the originals were donated to The Thurber House, where they are on permanent display.”

Danny Shanahan began contributing to The New Yorker in 1988. His Thurber trio appeared in the following issues of the magazine:

“Dr. Millmoss!” February 25, 1991

“Do you have an appointment?”  February 24, 1992

“Good show, Mitty!” April 12, 1993

 

 

Thurber Thursday: Personal History — The Thurber Article That Caused Me To Fly

Thurber Thursday: Personal History — The Thurber Article That Caused Me To Fly

When I ran across the above small article in early 1987, I was in my mid 30s, and had yet to step foot in an airplane. I drove anywhere I needed to go outside of the New York/Metropolitan area.  At the time the furthest south I’d traveled was Washington, D.C., the furthest north, Montreal; the furthest east: Eastport, Maine; the furthest west, Altoona, Pennsylvania (and that was by accident — I got lost taking a friend to State College, Pa).

But the idea of traveling to Ohio by car seemed, well, exhausting, so I agreed to fly to Columbus with fellow New Yorker cartoonist & Thurber fanatic (and soon to be wife), Liza Donnelly.  We booked a room at the Great Southern Hotel, where Thurber’s 92 celebratory drawings were hung, and flew out to Columbus in late February. Did I enjoy the flight? No. I can’t even go on a see-saw without experiencing “issues,” so being in a plane wasn’t fun. But what we found in Columbus was worth the anxiety of being up in the air.

The morning we arrived in Columbus we immediately headed over to The Thurber House. It wasn’t open yet, so Liza and I took pictures of each other on the front steps. We were standing on the porch of the house where the bed fell and the ghost got in… unbelievable.

We later toured the house, using this swell guide:

What can I say?  Being in the house was, for Thurber obsessives, probably comparable (if, say, you’re a Beatlemaniac) to traveling to Abbey Road and walking on the famous crosswalk.

Of our short stay at the Great Southern Hotel (shown left), I don’t remember our room, or even the hotel itself (other than it was enormous).

What I do remember was walking the hallways lined with original Thurber drawings. I can’t remember focusing on any one drawing while there  — the submersion was overwhelming. Luckily, the organizers provided a catalog of all the work shown.

So, yes, the flight was worth it (I would’ve preferred driving back home though). Other than flying home to New York from Columbus, the next time I flew was five years later… back to Columbus for this event at the Thurber House:

 

 

 

 

All’s Fair In Love & War Cover Revealed!; Interview Of Interest: Ed Steed; Article Of Interest: Tom Gauld; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Yesterday’s; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist…And Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Liza Donnelly On Drawing During The Pandemic

 

The cover of the 3rd title in Bob Eckstein’s fab Ultimate Cartoon Book series has just been posted on its publisher’s site. Princeton Architectural Press plans an October pub date for All’s Fair In Love & War. The cartoon on the cover is by the great Sam Gross (who also supplied the cover art for the first in the series, shown below left.  A Danny Shanahan cartoon appears on the second in the series, below right.

 

*full disclosure: my work appears in these collections.

_____________________________________________________________

Interview Of Interest: Ed Steed

From It’s Nice That, April 14, 2020 — this interview with Ed Steed, who’s been contributing his work to The New Yorker since 2013.

____________________________________________________________

Article Of Interest: Tom Gauld

From The New York Times, April 14, 2020,  “He Makes Physics Funny”  — this piece on Tom Gauld.

Visit his website here.

____________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…and Yesterday’s

A kid’s $ worries by Peter Kuper. Mr. Kuper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2011. Visit his website here.

Brooke Bourgeois on isolating on an island. Ms. Bourgeois has been contributing to The New Yorker since April of 2019. Visit her website here.

 

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“Is Covid-19 The Apocalypse? Generations React”   from Ward Sutton, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007. Visit his website here.

 

…and Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Ali Fitzgerald’s “Meet The Russian Trolls Meddling In Your Election”

 

_____________________________________________________

Liza Donnelly On Drawing During The Pandemic

From Medium, April 13, 2020, Drawing During The Pandemic — Liza Donnelly on how she graphically copes, including daily live drawing.

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Visit her website here.