Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; New York Comics And Picture-Story Symposium Goes Online Via Zoom; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist: Olivia de Recat; Blitt’s Screamin’ Kvetchbook

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Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell is today’s Daily Cartoonist.  See her Daily cartoon here, and visit her website here. Ms. Campbell began contributing to The New Yorker in November of 2017.

 

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New York Comics And Picture Story Symposium Goes Online Via Zoom

The Symposium, a treasure and a treat, has continued on online via Zoom. The next event is March 31st, 2020.   Here’s the website for more info.

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Today’s Daily Shouts, “Highly Relatable Fantasies For Everyone”  is by Olivia de Recat, who began contributing to The New Yorker in February of 2018. See her piece here, and visit her website here.

 

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This Week’s Blitt’s Kvetchbook

See Mr. Blitt’s 5 panel “We All Scream” here.

Barry Blitt has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1993.  Visit his website here.

The Wednesday Watch: Playboy Will End Its Print Edition; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon…And Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Playboy Will End Its Print Edition

From WWD, March 18, 2020, “Playboy Magazine Ceases Print Edition After 66 Years”

The magazine’s Spring 2020 issue will be its last print edition. An online edition will continue (the magazine says “special” issues may appear next year).  For many years, in the latter part of the Golden Age of Cartoons, as magazines that carried cartoons failed, Playboy emerged as the next best market (after The New Yorker), pay-wise, for single panel cartoonists. Like The New Yorker, the magazine had an anchor stable of artists, some of them on contract. In recent years the magazine dropped cartoons, and then brought some back.

Here’s further reading on  Hugh Hefner, aspiring cartoonist turned Playboy founder.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Getting to know you, by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, who began contributing to The New Yorker in October of 2017.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“How I Wish To Receive Notifictions” by Emily Flake, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.

Interview Of Interest: Emma Hunsinger; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Conde Nast Employees Work Remotely

Interview Of Interest: Emma Hunsinger

From Solrad, (undated, but posted 2020)  “Treating Myself to Gatorade and Gum: An Interview with Emma Hunsinger”

Ms. Hunsinger began contributing to The New Yorker in

November of 2017. Visit her website here.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Kuper on keeping one’s distance. Mr. Kuper began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011.  Visit his website here.

 

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Conde Nast Employees Work Remotely

From The New York Post, March 11, 2020, “NYC Publishers Tell Employees To Work From Home”

 

 

 

All New Yorker Cartoons Are New Yorker Drawings But Not All New Yorker Drawings Are New Yorker Cartoons; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

In a fun February 22nd 2020 post on The Daily Cartoonist celebrating the first appearance of James Thurber’s drawings in The New Yorker (shown above), the post’s author D.D. Degg wrote this:

There seems to be some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons. A New Yorker State of Mind, where the above screenshot comes from, calls them cartoons; whereas others disagree, calling them spot art. Cartoonist and New Yorker cartoon historian Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue (below).

To use language we’ve been hearing a lot of in Democratic debates: my name was invoked, so I would like to respond.

There really shouldn’t be “some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons.”  Using the New Yorker‘s language for referring to cartoons, in usage for 95 years, there are two ways one can go when referring to the magazine’s cartoons: you can call them cartoons, or you can call them drawings (and well yes, there’s a third descriptive:  some call them “art”). The magazine “officially” refers to them as drawings (you can see the designation on every Table Of Contents). There are three kinds of New Yorker cartoon formats: with a title (and that could mean a series of cartoons linked by a theme — all appearing in a spread. Booth, Ziegler, Levin, and Saxon, to name a few, were responsible for some terrific spreads over the years); with a caption; without a caption. I’ll show you three of mine as examples:

With a caption:

Without a caption:

With a title:

All of the above are cartoons, and they are also drawings. They all appeared in the magazine, surrounded in some part by text, but not linked to the text in any way other than graphic proximity. In Thurber’s Pet Department piece at the top of this post, the drawings are accompanying the text — the piece as a whole set off by a horizontal and vertical line. The seal, and the dog exist in Thurber’s piece to illustrate the text surrounding them. New Yorker cartoons, historically, do not reflect, or refer to, or illustrate the text surrounding them.  In Thurber’s Pet Department drawings there is no “one-two punch” with either drawing (according to Peter Arno, that one-two punch is an essential element of a New Yorker cartoon). The wonderful Thurber dog and seal, if removed from the accompanying text, and left on their own, would still be fun drawings (hey, they’re Thurber drawings after all). They might make us laugh; we may find it amusing that a seal is in a room with a table and lamp (I know I do). But if the drawings had been submitted as cartoons, sans accompanying text, I doubt the editors would’ve bought and run them as a stand alone drawing/cartoons (Spots maybe). There’s not enough cartoon there.

Another sliver from Mr. Degg’s post, referring specifically to Thurber’s dog and seal:

“…whereas others disagree, calling them spot art.”

New Yorker spot drawings are free range graphic pieces, not illustrating the text surrounding them (in modern times they sometimes do refer to an issue’s theme, if the issue is thematic), thus Thurber’s dog and seal are not New Yorker spot drawings.

Finally, Mr. Degg’s says:

“…Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue…”

My information concerning Thurber’s first New Yorker cartoon comes from Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography, published by Ohio State University Press in 1968. In all the years (close to 40 now) I’ve used this as a reference, I’ve yet to find an error.  While I heavily rely on Mr. Bowden’s good work, I also comb through back issues of The New Yorker.  In all of my combing, I’ve never found an earlier Thurber New Yorker cartoon than the one Mr. Bowden designated as the first ( that cartoon appeared in the issue of January 31, 1931).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on getting directions.

Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily: Avi Steinberg on a warm February.

Mr. Steinberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.

 

The Weekend Spill: Henry Martin’s New Yorker Spot Drawings; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of December 30, 2019 – January 3, 2020

                                       Henry Martin’s New Yorker Spot Drawings

From Princeton University’s Firestone Library Special Collections, “Henry Martin’s Spots” — this piece on Mr. Martin’s considerable Spot Drawing contribution to The New Yorker during his thirty-five year run at magazine. Here’s a fun photo from the article:

Henry Martin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Henry Martin (Photo: 1984). Born 1925, Louisville, Kentucky. New Yorker work: 1964 – 1999 . Collections: Good News / Bad News ( Scribners, 1977), Yak! Yak! Yak! Blah! Blah! Blah! (Scribners, 1977). Martin has illustrated a number of books, as well as writing and illustrating children’s books. Besides over 1000 spot drawings, Mr. Martin contributed approximately 650 cartoons to the magazine.

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A weekend round-up of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to newyorker.com features.

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, Jon Adams, Kim Warp, Ellie Black, Caitlin Cass.

Daily Shouts: Irving Ruan & Eugenia Viti, Julia Edelman & Olivia de Recat, Colin Stokes & Ellis Rosen, Matt Diffee.

And…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

See all of the above and more here.

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