The Weekend Spill: Henry Martin’s New Yorker Spot Drawings; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of December 30, 2019 – January 3, 2020

                                       Henry Martin’s New Yorker Spot Drawings

From Princeton University’s Firestone Library Special Collections, “Henry Martin’s Spots” — this piece on Mr. Martin’s considerable Spot Drawing contribution to The New Yorker during his thirty-five year run at magazine. Here’s a fun photo from the article:

Henry Martin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Henry Martin (Photo: 1984). Born 1925, Louisville, Kentucky. New Yorker work: 1964 – 1999 . Collections: Good News / Bad News ( Scribners, 1977), Yak! Yak! Yak! Blah! Blah! Blah! (Scribners, 1977). Martin has illustrated a number of books, as well as writing and illustrating children’s books. Besides over 1000 spot drawings, Mr. Martin contributed approximately 650 cartoons to the magazine.

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A weekend round-up of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to newyorker.com features.

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, Jon Adams, Kim Warp, Ellie Black, Caitlin Cass.

Daily Shouts: Irving Ruan & Eugenia Viti, Julia Edelman & Olivia de Recat, Colin Stokes & Ellis Rosen, Matt Diffee.

And…Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

See all of the above and more here.

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From The Archives: The Humble New Yorker Art Department Office Supply; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Here’s a fun oddity: the stamp/envelope moistener that once sat in The New Yorker‘s Art Department at the magazine’s 25 West 43rd Street address. The moistener, sold by Chicago’s Wilson Jones Company, seems have been manufactured in the 1940s. It was in use at The New Yorker until 1991, when the magazine moved south across 43rd Street to modern digs and more modern means of correspondence.

When I began contributing to The New Yorker in the 1970s, cartoonists either went into the office to drop off their weekly batch of drawings, or they mailed in their batch. If you sold a drawing, it would arrive by week’s end in a 10″x13″ manilla envelope with a glued flap.  I can’t help but think of the humble part the moistener –a  simple heavy object — played in the process of every New Yorker cartoonist’s life back then. It was part of a chain of events that began with the cartoonist’s creation of a drawing; the drawing then sent or brought to the magazine’s offices where it passed by the eyes of the art editor (James Geraghty, until 1973, and then Lee Lorenz).  If it made that first cut, it moved on to the art meeting, and shown to the editor (Harold Ross until 1951, William Shawn until 1987, then Robert Gottlieb). If the editor Oked it (and the fact checkers cleared it), the Oked cartoon was placed in a New Yorker envelope, sealed (!) and returned to the cartoonist. Trumpets didn’t blare upon its homecoming, but it was always a heart-racing “moment” seeing that envelope and unsealing it to find which of your drawings was now a New Yorker cartoon.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Help remembering 2020 by Avi Steinberg.

Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“Torture Devices Designed By My Inner Monologue”

by Irving Ruan, and cartoonist Eugenia Viti, who began contributing to The New Yorker in in June of 2019.

 

Last Batch Of Cartoons Of The Year Temporary Blues; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

It’s a Tuesday, deadline day for sending in one’s batch of cartoons to The New Yorker’s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.  In my four plus decades of sending in a weekly batch of cartoons it’s always the very last batch of the year that has a different feel to it. Throughout the year, I send off the weekly batch of drawings like one might shove off in a rowboat from a dock — with some anticipation. But the send-off for the last batch of the year has always had a split-second of wistfulness about it…oh boy, another year gone by.

Curiously, the wistfulness lasts only until I hit the “send” button on my batch-loaded email to Ms. Allen. The moment my laptop screen informs me “Message sent,” I’m eager to get started on the first batch of the new year. As tempting as it is to dwell momentarily on the past, right about now I’m more in a Bob Dylan “Don’t Look Back” mood.  Bring on the blank sheets of paper!

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Godfather & regifting, by Avi Steinberg, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.