Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Bob Eckstein …and Yesterday’s Daily Cartoon & Daily Shouts; Blog Of Great Interest: A New Yorker State Of Mind; More Spills…

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Sports Not Cancelled by Bob Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007.  Visit his website here.

…and Yesterday’s Daily Cartoon

— outer space distancing, by Avi Steinberg, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

Yesterday’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

From Paul Karasik, “It’s Time To Start Talking to Yourself”

— Mr. Karasik began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

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Blog Of Interest: A New Yorker State Of Mind

Want to get away from this period of trial and time-travel to another period of trial? Well here’s an issue for you.

This Spill fave blog looks very closely at the contents of the March 14, 1931 issue of The New Yorker. The blog’s customary deep-dive is, as always, fascinating.

The cover is by the great Rea Irvin.

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New Yorker contributor Emily Flake has written the introduction to Trots And Bonnie a collection of Shary Flenniken’s National Lampoon strips.

The New York Times Sunday Magazine includes this piece (“In Praise of a Normal Boring Country”) by New Yorker cover contributor, Christoph Niemann.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of March 23, 2020: No GOAT

The Cover: This week’s cover, by Christoph Niemann is right on the money. The New Yorker‘s art editor, Francoise Mouly, has a Q&A with the artist here.

Historical Note:  this is the first issue of The New Yorker  not to include a Goings On About Town section. A notice appears on this week’s Table of Contents.

A potted history of GOAT (as it’s sometimes affectionately called)

The very first issue of The New Yorker  included a “conscientious calendar of events worth while” called Goings On.  The very first Goings On was just one page, near the back of the book. Below is the heading of that first Goings On.

The Goings On heading survived up through the issue of October 31, 1925. Goings On About Town was used for the very first time in the next issue (November 7, 1925). Goings On About Town was moved to the very front of the magazine in the issue of January 23, 1926.

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And now back to the present…and this week’s issue.

The Cartoonists:

Once again, I’ve posted the entire listing of artists as this week’s Spots are by the fab cover artist, Marcellus Hall.

There is a newbie this week: Matilda Borgstrom, who is the third new cartoonist to enter The New Yorker‘s stable of cartoonists this year, and the fifty-sixth new cartoonist brought in under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship, begun in the Spring of 2017.

The Cartoons:

There are, as you would expect, a number of cartoons (“Drawings”) this week reflecting directly or indirectly the times we’re in: Roz Chast’s store front sign referencing hand sanitizer and face masks, Frank Cotham’s castle cleaning crew, Liza Donnelly’s kitchen full of fermented food, Emily Flake’s monster coming out of a closet.

The remaining cartoons take us away for awhile– as we’d want them to; the variety includes a mermaid, a couple of cowboys, a typing kitty, stargazers…and more.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Virus, or no virus, the watch continues. Read about Mr. Irvin’s moth-balled iconic Talk masthead here.

Here’s what we’re no longer seeing:

 

 

Thurber Thursday; James Stevenson’s Hat Trick Issue Of The New Yorker: March 22, 1969; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; From The Department Of “What The…?”

Thurber Thursday

Here’s an oddity from the Spill’s archive. An eight page pamphlet containing James Thurber’s speech delivered upon receiving the Ohioana Sesquicentennial Medal. The Citation reads (in part): In appreciation of your generosity of spirit…originality of concept…your matchless satire…at times pure wit…oft times gentle humor…your priceless gift of laughter…boon to disturbed mankind…In recognition of the world wide fame you have bestowed on the state of Ohio and your home town of Columbus the pleasure you have given readers round the globe.

Thurber couldn’t be there in person to accept, so his speech was read by the then editor of The Columbus Dispatch. The award was presented in October of 1954.  It included this oft-cited passage:

I have lived in the East for nearly thirty years now, but many of my books prove that I am never very far away from Ohio in my thoughts, and that the clocks that strike in my dreams are often the clocks of Columbus.

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James Stevenson’s Hat Trick Issue Of The New Yorker: March 22, 1969

Look closely at the above table of contents and you’ll see James Stevenson’s name appears three times. He’s credited with the piece, “Notes From an Exhibition”; he’s credited with the cover, and he is credited with contributing a cartoon, under “Drawings.” Perhaps — perhaps! — we shouldn’t be surprised that Mr. Stevenson’s work was all over the place in the issue. He is believed to be the most prolific New Yorker contributor of all time (if you add up his cartoons, his covers and his written contributions). This weighty presence in the magazine is best exhibited in the Sally William’s documentary,  Stevenson: Lost And Found,* when the filmmaker animates Mr. Stevenson’s black binders piling up in the magazine’s library. Every New Yorker contributor’s work is added into a binder.  If you’ve contributed  a lot of work, you end up with your own binder. If your work exceeds the binder’s page limit, you get a second binder, and so on.  Mr. Stevenson has five binders in the magazine’s library. They look like this:

A fun fact about the above Table of Contents: The New Yorker that appeared the week before had a Table of Contents that looked (exactly) like the one shown below. For a magazine that rarely (in those days) messed with its design, this change to a more informative Table of Contents was a very big thing. The next time The Table Of Contents design changed was the issue of October 5, 1992 — the debut issue of Tina Brown’s editorship.

*It was announced just yesterday that Stevenson: Lost and Found has been selected to screen at The Newport Beach Film Festival, Salem Film Fest, and Block Island Film Festival.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on VP Pence’s new job assignment. Ms. Parkhurst has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2017.

 

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From the Department of “What The…?”

During one of my many daily Google searches for New Yorker cartoonist news, this special little box shown below titled “New Yorker Illustrators” turned up (I’ve provided a screenshot).  I wasn’t searching for New Yorker illustrators — this came to me unbidden. Of the several things wrong with this offered selection, besides the glaring one sitting dead center, is that only one of the people shown — Mr. Niemann — is a New Yorker illustrator (unless Trump does illustration work on the side I’m not aware of). And okay, okay, I’ll  add the obvious “quip”: I never thought Donald Trump would get between me and my wife.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of September 30, 2019

The Cover: Christoph Niemann returns for the Technology Issue.  Read Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with him about his cover.

The Cartoonists & Cartoons:

Electronically flipping through this new issue (appropriately enough for the Technology Issue) I was happy that the cartoons just kept-a-comin’; there are seventeen of them to be exact. All of them are placed well (i.e., they have plenty of breathing room, and sit well on the page).

Here are random thoughts about some of the cartoons in the new issue…

Joe Dator’s laundromat drawing (page 50): When asked why The New Yorker didn’t run color cartoons*, The New Yorker‘s founder and first editor, Harold Ross reportedly said, “What’s so funny about red?”  What he didn’t say was,“What’s so funny about beet red?”  Mr. Dators’ drawing, incorporating beet red, is hilarious.

I hovered over Victoria Roberts’ campers and bear drawing (p.46), enjoying the drawing itself. We’re used to seeing many of Ms. Roberts drawings set indoors — it’s fun to see her drawing of a tent, and a bear (or a man in a bear suit).

Jason Patterson’s ice cream trucks heading south for the winter  (p. 25) is also fun to linger on. Its concept seems out of the Jack Ziegler school of zany.  Such a good drawing.

Also of note, graphically, and otherwise-ly: Ellie Black’s little red riding hood drawing (p.78)…and Maggie Mull’s Beautiful Mind-ish drawing on page 70; nice to see it stretched out on the page.

Shannon Wheeler’s broccoli opera drawing on page 77.  Its execution is reminiscent of some of William Steig’s middle period work (check out Steig’s 1942 collection, The Lonely Ones).

And of note in a different department: the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes’ Shouts & Murmurs piece,“Running With Scissors” (p.33).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead drawing (below) has yet to return.  Hope springs eternal here on The Spill. Read about it here.

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*There were two color cartoons in Ross’s era, very early on in the magazine’s life; both appeared in the issue of December 12, 1925. A full page by Ralph Barton, and a double page spread by Rea Irvin. Mr. Barton did not use red in his drawing, Mr. Irvin did.

 

 

Darrin Bell Wins Pulitzer For Editorial Cartooning; The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 22, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Elisabeth McNair; Bliss & Martin, Cont’d

Darrin Bell Wins Pulitzer For Editorial Cartooning

From The Washington Post, April 15, 2019, “How the Trayvon Martin tragedy led to Darrin Bell’s historical editorial cartooning Pulitzer.”  Mr. Bell began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Link to his website here.

(Above: Mr. Bell, and one of his New Yorker cartoons, published July 9, 2018)

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The Cover:  Loveis Wise’s piece is added to the magazine’s collection of “covers about grooming.”  Read about it here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Becky Barnicoat makes her New Yorker debut this week. Ms. Barnicoat is the 8th new cartoonist to join the magazine’s stable this year, the 3rd this month, and the 33rd to be brought in since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

Of note: a double-page “Sketchbook” by Liana Finck.  

The Illustrators (in acknowledgement of their graphic presence per issue, the Spill will, from time-to-time, list the issue’s illustrators):

Philip Montgomery, Tillie Walden, Isabell Seliger, Laura Breiling, Jack Mitchell, Diego Patino, Alec Soth, Amy Lombard, Joost Swarte, Joao Fazenda, Devin Yalken, Luci Gutierrez, Zohar Lazar, Tyler Comrie, (photo courtesy of) Ben Taub), (photo courtesy of) Mohamedou Salahi, Eiko Ojala, Cristiana Couceiro, Ana Galvan, Rune Fisker, John Rogers (photo)/Mike McQuade (illus.), Bendik Kaltenborn

And speaking of illustrators, Christoph Niemann’s redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead remains in place nearly two years after it was installed. For those who wish to read about the original, go here

Below: Mr. Irvin’s Talk Masthead

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Dogs and taxes, by Elisabeth McNair.  Ms. McNair began contributing to The New Yorker in July of 2018.  Link here to her website.

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Bliss & Martin, Cont’d

Noted here in late March, Harry Bliss has been working with a high profile gagwriter.  Today there’s news of a book of cartoons in the works.