The Weekend Spill: Bob Eckstein’s Cartoon Newsletter, “The Bob”; The Tilley Watch Online, April 26 – May 1, 2020; Like Links?

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Bob Eckstein’s Newsletter, “The Bob”

Here’s a fun (and free!) cartoon-centric newsletter. Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007, generously provides more than a good handful of his cartoons, and then some.

Subscribe here to The Bob.

Among Mr. Eckstein’s many pursuits [see below] is editing a series of cartoon collections*, all published by Princeton Architectural Press: The Ultimate Cartoon Book of  Book Cartoons, Everyone’s A Critic: The Ultimate Cartoon Book, and the forthcoming All’s Fair In Love And War: The Ultimate Cartoon Book.

Here’s Bob Eckstein’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Bob Eckstein (photo above courtesy of the artist) Born, New York, NY, Feb. 27 1963. New Yorker work: July 2007 – Author of The History of the Snowman (Simon & Schuster, 2007) and Footnotes From the World’s Greatest Bookstores: True Tales and Lost Moments From Book Buyers, Booksellers, and Book Lovers (Penguin Random House, 2016). New Yorker work: 2007 -. Website: www.bobeckstein.com/

*Full disclosure: my work appears in this series.

Mr. Eckstein’s squirrel drawing above appeared as a Daily Cartoon on newyorker.com, March 27, 2020. 

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features, April 26 -May 1, 2020

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, David Ostow, Christopher Weyant, Hilary Allison, Sam Marlow

Daily Shouts: Sara Lautman (with Jessica Dellfino), Caitlin Cass, Eugenia Viti

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “Really Enhanced Interrogation”

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Like Links?

If you like links as much as I do you might enjoy The Comics Journal’s weekly round-up compiled by Clark Burscough. There are no New Yorker cartoonists mentioned in this week’s post (sorry if I missed someone; cover artist Chris Ware is mentioned tho), it’s fun to see what’s happening outside the New Yorker cartoon beltway.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of May 4, 2020

The Cover: In Francoise Mouly’s Q&A with this week’s cover artist, Chris Ware, she informs us that the issue is anchored by “a kaleidoscopic account of a single day in New York.”  And so we see a cover, in Mr. Ware’s patented style, loaded with snapshots of the city —  a cover nearly devoid of people.

The Cartoonists:

Liza Donnelly, Robert Leighton, Amy Hwang, Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, Liana Finck, Julia Suits, Frank Cotham, Lars Kenseth, Peter Steiner, Karl Stevens, Edward Steed, Elisabeth McNair, Ali Solomon

The Cartoons:

First thing I noticed zipping through this week’s cartoons (via the slideshow on newyorker.com) is that 9 of the 14 drawings contain non-humans. Is this unusual? I don’t know; haven’t kept track of the human/non-human ratio of the cartoons over the years [if anyone has, please let me know — I’d love to see the numbers]. What may be unusual are the three drawings in a row containing two animals apiece: Ed Steed’s two cows, Elisabeth McNair’s pig and squirrel, and Ali Solomon’s two seals.

The remaining half-dozen cartoons featuring non-humans: Peter Steiner’s shark (fins), Lars Kenseth’s multitude of rabbits, Roz Chast’s cow, Liana Finck’s dog(?), and Amy Hwang’s snails. This week’s lead cartoon, by Liza Donnelly, is a direct nod to NYC’s shut-down (it features a none-too-pleased caged subway rat).

The high percentage of animals in the issue reminded me of this passage from Brendan Gill’s Here At The New Yorker:

“Once, Geraghty [the magazine’s Art editor from 1939-1973] mentioned to me that the art department ‘bank’ contained a deplorably high number of jokes featuring conversations between animals. I proposed that the artwork of an entire issue of the magazine be devoted to talking-animal jokes, thus reducing the bank and just possibly causing our readers to lose their minds.  My proposal was accepted, the issue came out, and as far as the magazine could judge, the prank went largely unobserved.” 

Other Cartoons That Caught My Eye:

It seemed pre-ordained that Roz Chast would do a panic buying drawing. Love her (signed) photo drawing of “Der Bingle.” Mick Stevens’s me time drawing is a fine/fun piece of work; applause applause for the way Frank Cotham handled the damned in his splendid media attention drawing. I’ve no idea how Mr. Cotham’s cartoon is sized (I don’t have access to the digital edition yet) but this cartoon would certainly work beautifully on a half-page.  (Update, now that the digital issue is available:  Mr. Cotham’s drawing has been run a bit larger than most of the issue’s cartoons…not a half-page tho.)

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Without having the digital issue in front of me I’ve no idea if Mr. Irvin’s classic Talk masthead (below), shown the door, and replaced by a redraw in the Spring of 2017, has finally returned.  Here’s more information on it.(Update: the redraw still appears. The classic remains in storage)

Behold the real deal!

 

 

 

 

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Blitt’s Kvetchbook; Finck’s Dear Pepper; Video Of Interest: Ivan Brunetti, Chris Ware and “Peanuts Papers” Editor, Andrew Blauner; A Case For Pencils Spotlights Evan Lian

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Peter Kuper on Trump’s defense. 

Mr. Kuper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2011. Visit his website here.

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Blitt’s Kvetchbook

Barry Blitt’s latest: “A 2020 Guide To Shadow Puppetry”

Mr. Blitt began contributing to The New Yorker in 1994. Visit his website here.

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Finck’s Dear Pepper

The latest entry from Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper” column: “A Text Relationship And Building A Community” 

Ms. Finck has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2013.

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Video Of Interest: Ivan Brunetti, Chris Ware, And “Peanuts Papers” Editor, Andrew Blauner

From The Library Of America, this video, “‘How To Be A Man Who’s Not a Jerk’: Chris Ware on Charles M. Schulz, Mr. Rogers, Beethoven”

Mr. Brunetti and Mr. Ware contribute covers to The New Yorker.

 

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A Case For Pencils Spotlights Evan Lian

Evan Lian’s tools of the trade courtesy of Jane Mattimoe’s fab blog.  Read it here.

 

 

Podcasts Of Interest: Joe Dator, Chris Ware; AddamsFest Begins In His Hometown; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A Daily Shouts By…Amy Hwang

Podcast Of Interest: Joe Dator

Mr. Dator, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006, was a guest on The Better Breakroom. Visit his website here.

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Podcast Of Interest: Chris Ware

Chris Ware was Gil Roth’s most recent guest on his long-running (and cartoonist-filled) podcast The Virtual Memories Show.  Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

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Addamsfest Begins In His Hometown

And it begins! Charles Addams hometown of Westfield, New Jersey begins its month long celebration.  All the details here.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A UFO, and politics, by David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

 

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A Daily Shouts By…Amy Hwang

Are you Very Organized?  by Amy Hwang, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Donnelly & Thurber’s Influence; A Thurber Event At The Society Of Illustrators; The Tilley Watch Online; Interview Of Interest: Seth; Chris Ware In Conversation With Chip Kidd

Donnelly & Thurber’s Influence

From The Cleveland Plain Dealer (cleveland.com), September 1, 2019, “James Thurber continues to influence today’s cartoonists”  — this piece by Marilyn Greenwald

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A Thurber Anniversary Event At The Society Of Illustrators

From The Society Of Illustrators, this notice of a Thurber event this coming October. Coinciding with the 125th birthday celebration publication of Collected Fables and A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber and the extensive exhibit of Thurber art in his hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

The evening, hosted by Michael Rosen (author, editor, illustrator, and  founding director of The Thurber House) will include long-time New Yorker contributors, Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, and yours truly.

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A week end round up of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Trevor Spaulding, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Emily Flake, David Sipress, and Tim Hamilton.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck (another in her “Dear Pepper” series), Ali Fitzgerald, Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman),

…And: Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook returned; cover artist Jenny Kroik contributed a piece, “New York: En Espanol” to The Culture Desk.

You can see all of the above and more here.

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Interview Of Interest: Seth

From The Comics Beat, August 30, 2019, Alex Dueben interviews New Yorker cover artist, Seth.  Read it here.

Seth (real name: Gregory Gallant) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Chris Ware In Conversation With Chip Kidd, Sept. 25th

Designer Chip Kidd sits down with Chis Ware on September 25th in Oak Park, Illinois to discuss Mr. Ware’s soon-to-be-released graphic novel, Rusty Brown (Pantheon) . All the details here.

Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.