Podcasts Of Interest: Joe Dator, Chris Ware; AddamsFest Begins In His Hometown; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; A Daily Shouts By…Amy Hwang

Podcast Of Interest: Joe Dator

Mr. Dator, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2006, was a guest on The Better Breakroom. Visit his website here.

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Podcast Of Interest: Chris Ware

Chris Ware was Gil Roth’s most recent guest on his long-running (and cartoonist-filled) podcast The Virtual Memories Show.  Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

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Addamsfest Begins In His Hometown

And it begins! Charles Addams hometown of Westfield, New Jersey begins its month long celebration.  All the details here.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A UFO, and politics, by David Sipress, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

 

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A Daily Shouts By…Amy Hwang

Are you Very Organized?  by Amy Hwang, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Donnelly & Thurber’s Influence; A Thurber Event At The Society Of Illustrators; The Tilley Watch Online; Interview Of Interest: Seth; Chris Ware In Conversation With Chip Kidd

Donnelly & Thurber’s Influence

From The Cleveland Plain Dealer (cleveland.com), September 1, 2019, “James Thurber continues to influence today’s cartoonists”  — this piece by Marilyn Greenwald

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A Thurber Anniversary Event At The Society Of Illustrators

From The Society Of Illustrators, this notice of a Thurber event this coming October. Coinciding with the 125th birthday celebration publication of Collected Fables and A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber and the extensive exhibit of Thurber art in his hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

The evening, hosted by Michael Rosen (author, editor, illustrator, and  founding director of The Thurber House) will include long-time New Yorker contributors, Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, and yours truly.

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A week end round up of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to the Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Trevor Spaulding, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Emily Flake, David Sipress, and Tim Hamilton.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck (another in her “Dear Pepper” series), Ali Fitzgerald, Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman),

…And: Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook returned; cover artist Jenny Kroik contributed a piece, “New York: En Espanol” to The Culture Desk.

You can see all of the above and more here.

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Interview Of Interest: Seth

From The Comics Beat, August 30, 2019, Alex Dueben interviews New Yorker cover artist, Seth.  Read it here.

Seth (real name: Gregory Gallant) began contributing to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Chris Ware In Conversation With Chip Kidd, Sept. 25th

Designer Chip Kidd sits down with Chis Ware on September 25th in Oak Park, Illinois to discuss Mr. Ware’s soon-to-be-released graphic novel, Rusty Brown (Pantheon) . All the details here.

Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue Of August 5 & 12, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

The Cover: Lotsa ice cream on Olimpia Zagnoli’s second New Yorker cover. I’m immediately reminded of any number of early Vogue covers.  Read the Cover Story here.

The Cartoonists:

…a newbie: Lisa Rothstein is the 22nd new cartoonist added to the magazine’s stable this year, and the 48th new cartoonist added since cartoon editor Emma Allen’s tenure began in May 2017.

The Cartoons: quite the surprise seeing a cartoon (on p.61) by the late great Jack Ziegler.  It got me to wondering if perhaps The New Yorker might set up a special online section for the contributors who left us with a lot of work still in the bank (or, as originally designated, “on the bank” — that is,  work bought, but not yet published). When William Steig passed away there was a rumor that hundreds of his drawings (and some covers) were still on the bank. One wonders about the on the bank work of Charles Barsotti, as well as Mr. Ziegler, Leo Cullum, and Michael Crawford, to name but a few dear departed colleagues. Wouldn’t it be great to see this work gathered online.  

Also of interest in this double issue: a cartoon by the one-and-only Sam Gross, who celebrates his 50th year at The New Yorker in August. His first New Yorker drawing appeared in the issue of August 23, 1969 (the Spill will further note the occasion on August 23, 2019).

Speaking of Jack Ziegler, Ed Steed’s squid drawing (p. 37) calls to mind Mr. Ziegler’s classic squid drawing from the issue of September 16, 1996 (it was also used as the cover drawing, and title of Ziegler’s 2004 food cartoon anthology). A quick search for squid cartoons in the Cartoon Bank’s database brought up just two other squid drawings: this one by Danny Shanahan, and this one by Farley Katz).

Also of note:

… J.A.K.’s drawing (p.21) — my fave Jason Adam Katzenstein drawing of all time (so far)

…Chris Ware’s 8 page “Mr. Ware” (he talks about it here).

… Sizing of drawings this issue: most seem right on the money (examples: Sam Gross’s, Zach Kanin’s, Roz Chast’s, Lars Kenseth’s).

…:A goodly number of non-human centric drawings this issue: cockroaches (McNair), the aforementioned squid by Mr. Steed, a bull (McNamee), a parrot (Gross), a blender (Chast), hugging dogs (Rothstein), rocks (Hwang), shishto peppers (Kenseth).

Rea Irvin: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (it appeared for 92 years) disappeared in the Spring of 2017 (read about it here) — replaced by — gasp! — a redraw (not redrawn by Mr. Irvin, who passed away in 1972). Will the original ever return? Here it is until then:

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016, on opinions/films.

 

 

 

 

Book On The Horizon…”A Mile And A Half Of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly; Audio Of Interest: Roz Chast; Audio Of Interest: Bob Eckstein: Chris Ware In School; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Farley Katz

Coming this July from Ohio State University Press,  A Mile And A Half of Lines: The Art Of James Thurber.

Edited by Michael Rosen, with contributions from Rosemary Thurber, Liza Donnelly, Seymour Chwast, Ian Frazier, and yours truly.

From the publisher:

Humorist, cartoonist, writer, playwright. James Thurber was to the twentieth century what Mark Twain was to the nineteenth. At one point, his books were the most read of any American in the world. His work could be found anywhere—from the pages of the New Yorker to the pages of children’s books, from illustrated advertisements to tea towels and dresses. Now, in celebration of the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth, A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber is a long overdue introduction and reintroduction to James Thurber and the artwork that fundamentally changed American cartoons. Including some 260 drawings, this collection is the first comprehensive focus on his work as an artist, a cartoonist, and an illustrator.

Coinciding with the first major retrospective of Thurber’s art presented by the Columbus Museum of Art in 2019, A Mile and a Half of Lines showcases both classic Thurber as well as visual material never before seen in print.

 

Here’s James Thurber’s entry on Ink Spill‘s New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z:

James Thurber Born, Columbus, Ohio, December 8, 1894. Died 1961, New York City. New Yorker work: 1927 -1961, with several pieces run posthumously.  According to the New Yorker’s legendary editor, William Shawn, “In the early days, a small company of writers, artists, and editors — E.B. White, James Thurber, Peter Arno, and Katharine White among them — did more to make the magazine what it is than can be measured.”  

Key cartoon collection: The Seal in the Bedroom and Other Predicaments (Harper & Bros., 1932). Key anthology (writings & drawings): The Thurber Carnival (Harper & Row, 1945). There have been a number of Thurber biographies. Burton Bernstein’s Thurber (Dodd, Mead, 1975) and Harrison Kinney’s James Thurber: His Life and Times (Henry Holt & Co., 1995)  are essential. A short bio appears on the Thurber House website: http://www.thurberhouse.org/about-james-thurber/

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Video of Interest: Liza Donnelly

Liza Donnelly was just out in Silicon Valley live-drawing at the Global Women In Data Science Conference. A short video here about her work

Ms. Donnelly began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982.  Here’s her website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

A lot of fun snowman talk in this half -hour radio interview with Mr. Eckstein, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007. (scroll down to February 13, 2019).

Mr. Eckstein is also the editor of this upcoming cartoon anthology:

Link here to Bob Eckstein’s website.

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Radio Interview of Interest: Roz Chast

From WBAI (NYC), March 6, 2019, this hour-long interview with Roz Chast.

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978.  Here’s her website.

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Chris Ware In School

From Skidmore College, March 6, 2019, “Cartoonist Chris Ware Talks Art careers”  — Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.  

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

 Facebook is the subject of today’s Daily, courtesy of cartoonist Farley Katz.  Mr. Katz began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.  Here’s his website.

 

 

Society Of Illustrators Names Hall Of Fame Inductees; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Shannon Wheeler; More Gerberg; Event Of Interest: Chris Ware; Even More Shermund; Interviews Of Interest: Bob Eckstein, Gahan Wilson

From The Daily Cartoonist, February 14, 2019, “Society Of illustrators 2019 Hall of Fame” — Read here! (Spoiler: Two New Yorker folks named!)

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, tuned in to today’s heart-shaped celebration, is by Shannon Wheeler, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

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More Gerberg

Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon, published in the issue of April 10, 1965.

From amNewYork, February 14, 2019, “Mort Gerberg retrospective spotlights cartoonnist’s witty views of NY life”

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From The Albany Times-Union, February 12, 2019, Cartoonist Chris Ware Speaks, Signs Books.

Mr. Ware’s Monograph, published in 2017

Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

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Even More Shermund

A Shermund self-portrait

From Columbus Monthly, “Burying Barbara Shermund, A Forgotten Cartoonist” — more on the late great Ms. Shermund. Read here.

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Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

Bob Eckstein’s fabulous Snowman book

A radio interview with a lot of snowman talk (as you’d expect when the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert is the interviewee), and some cartoon talk as well at the close. Listen here.

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Interview of Interest: Gahan Wilson

Jason Sacks interviews Gahan Wilson. Listen here.

Mr. Wilson began contributing to The New Yorker in 1976. Link here to his website.