Personal History: Work Wall

I’ve always worked at home, sometimes in a dedicated corner of the living room, sometimes using the arm of any old comfortable chair as a desk. But for many years I worked in a converted 6′ x 8′ laundry room. My desk faced a wall, part of which is shown above.  One day, after about twenty years of working in front of that wall, I felt I needed open space, and so I picked up my Rapidograph and a small stack of bond paper, then walked fifteen feet or so into our living room and set up shop at a table with no wall in front of me.

I left my old work area completely intact — a stack of bond paper still rests in its usual place —  and every so often I return to work there (I’m working there now).  What you see above is fragment of the wall above my desk. The collection of cartoons has always been a kind of rotating mini-gallery. There are a lot of New Yorker materials on the shelves (mixed in with childhood train set buildings, metal toys, art made by my kids, etc., etc.).  Just for fun, I’ve provided a key to anything New Yorker-related (and a few not)

1.  Joe Dator New Yorker original drawing. Published February 28, 2011.

2.  Stan Hunt original drawing.  Publishing history unknown. The fellow on the porch swing is saying to the woman: “Darling, your eyes are like dark limpid pools! …What’s the matter, aren’t you getting enough sleep?”  Mr. Hunt contributed to The New Yorker from 1956 though 1990.

3. Charlie Hankin original drawing. Unpublished. The sign on the lawn reads “Beware of Clam”

4. George Booth original. Titled Dog, Chair, and Chicken. Unpublished. Mr. Booth drew this in The New Yorker‘s cartoon department a few years ago while being filmed. Luckily, Liza Donnelly was also there being filmed.  Mr. Booth generously handed the drawing to her when filming wrapped. 

5. E.B. White’s The Lady Is Cold.  His first book. This became the subject of an Ink Spill piece.

6. Batman Giant No. 182.  In the late 1960s,  when my family moved from one end of town to the other end, only two comic books of my vast comic book collection made the transition (sad, I know). This is one of them.

7. The New Yorker Album.  Published in 1928 by Doubleday, Doran & Co. The very first New Yorker cartoon album.

8. A Rox Chast letter from the pre-personal computer days, probably late 1980s. In this New Yorker cartoon crowd, exchanged letters were usually illustrated.  I’m especially fond of this one because of the White Castle drawing at the very top (it’s possible my White Castle coffee mug made an impression on her).

9. We’ll Show You The Town. A 1934 promotional book from The New Yorker‘s business  department. You can see a little more about this if you go to the From the Attic section of the Spill and scroll down.

10. What! No Pie Charts?  An undated promotional book from The New Yorker‘s business department. Profusely illustrated by Julien de Miskey. As the copy refers to the magazine’s original address as 25 West 45th Street, we can safely assume this was published pre mid-1930s.

11. The American Mercury. August 1948.  Up on the shelf because of the great cover of the magazine’s founder and first editor, Harold Ross along with a re-drawn (i.e., non Rea Irvin) Eustace Tilley. The cover story “Ross Of The New Yorker” by Allen Churchill is a good read.

12. Curtain Calls of 1926. From the title page:

In which a few choice rare bits that have occasionally appeared in the pages of The New Yorker repeat themselves.

This is a lovely little book spotlighted on the Spill in July of 2013. Rea Irvin did the Tilley drawing on the cover.

13. Batman In Detective Comics Vol. 1 (Abbeville Press 1993).  Covering the first 25 years.  Vol. 2 is sitting right behind it. 

14. A Thurber Garland. Published by Hamish Hamilton in 1955.

15. The Making Of A Magazine. Undated. A promotional booklet collecting some, but not all of Corey Ford’s pieces. Drawings by Johan Bull.   Link here for more info.

16. James Thurber’s New York Times obit, dated November 3, 1961. The headline reads: James Thurber Is Dead At 66; Writer Was Also A Comic Artist . I’ll say!    Read more here on the Spill’s morgue.

***unnumbered, appearing just below #6’s Batman Giant, and the toy helicopter, is Otto Soglow’s Little King pull toy.  You can see it close up in the From the Attic section.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 29, 2019; Seven Earth Day Animations By Liza Donnelly For CBS This Morning; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Tom Toro; Reminder! Tomorrow At Word Bookstore, A Trio Of New Yorker Cartoonists; Lost Gems By Charles Addams, Barbara Shermund, William Steig, And Syd Hoff From Dick Buchanan

The Cover: As mentioned here days back, Bob Staake’s cover was (very) early released. You can read what Mr. Staake has to say about it here

The Cartoonists:

This is Darrin Bell’s first appearance in the magazine since his Pulitzer win was announced.

 The cartoon by Miriam Katin marks her debut appearance in the magazine.  She is the 9th new cartoonist brought into the stable this year, and the 34th new cartoonist brought in since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

The Cartoons:

Three cartoons especially stood out this week.

  Joe Dator‘s world continues to fascinate. His floating mammals drawing (p.34) is about as good as it gets. The drawing itself is great, as is the caption. If the Cartoon Companion guys were still in the business of rating cartoons, this would certainly be awarded their blue ribbon. 

Another contender is Ed Steed‘s trapeze artists with baby (p.28). For me, it’s the best baby-centric New Yorker drawing since Zach Kanin’s wonderful drawing of July 7, 2008, “I can feel the baby kicking.”

Charlie Hankin‘s cartoon (on p.64):  like desert island drawings, the cartoon scenario of a person seated by the fire with their mounted trophies up on the wall has been around in the cartoon universe for a very long time. Mr. Hankin has given us a terrific “If I Had A Hammer” moment.

Finally…

Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead has not yet been returned — its replacement, a re-draw, continues to appear.  Read about the unfortunate situation here. Below is the real thing.

Below: Mr. Irvin himself, looking a little frustrated?

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Seven Animations For Earth Day By Liza Donnelly

CBS News This Morning has posted seven Earth Day specific animations by Liza Donnelly (Ms. Donnelly is their resident cartoonist). See the work on Twitter @LizaDonnelly & @CBSThisMorning.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Tom Toro delivers a Games of Throne-ish drawing. Mr. Toro began contributing to The New Yorker  in 2010.  

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A Reminder! Three New Yorker Cartoonists at Word Bookstore Tomorrow

An event celebrating a fun new book with three fun cartoonists. Further info here.

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Dick Buchanan’s Files via Mike Lynch: “New Yorker Luminaries 1933-1942″

Further lost gems from Mr. Buchanan’s files via Mike Lynch’s site include work from Charles Addams, Whitney Darrow, Jr., William Steig, Richard Taylor, Syd Hoff, Richard Decker, and Barbara Shermund.  Above, a Barbara Shermund drawing from Colliers, September 10, 1938. See them all here.

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue Of December 24 & 31, 2018

The Cover: The last issue of the year is also the “Power Issue” (the fellows depicted on the cover certainly reflect various measures of power).  Read what the cover artist Barry Blitt had to say about his Sherlocklike cover.

The Cartoonists in the issue:

As it’s the end of the year, I’ll dispense with counting the number of illustrations.  Let’s just say the ratio of illustrations to cartoons remains the same as it’s been in recent times.

Two cartoon items of note:

  1.  Couldn’t help but think of the famous Saturday Night Live Christopher Walken More Cowbell skit when I came to Charlie Hankin’s very funny drawing, “I’m gonna need even less tuba.”  A nod to Mr. Walken’s hilarious classic perhaps?
  2. I believe that this is the New Yorker print debut for cartoonist Christine Mi. If true, she is the 12th new cartoonist to appear this year and the 24th since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

As we head off to the flickering bright lights of 2019, let us not forget Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead.  It disappeared in the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Fave Photo of the Day

Cartoon Companion is back with their deep-ish takes on every cartoon in the latest issue of the New Yorker (May 28, 2018). Charlie Hankin is awarded the CC’s “Top Toon” ribbon.  Read it here!

Mr. Hankin has been contributing to The New Yorker since August of 2013. Link to his website here.

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Fave Photo of the Day

Five New Yorker cartoonists today in lower Manhattan: clockwise from top left: Bob Eckstein, Ken Krimstein, Robert Leighton, Nick Downes, and David Borchart.  

Mr. Eckstein has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2007; Mr. Krimstein since 2000, Mr. Leighton since 2002; Mr. Downes since 1998; Mr. Borchart since 2007.

(photo courtesy of Spill photographer, Bob Eckstein)

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of May 28, 2018

Gayle Kabaker‘s charming cover kicks off summertime ’18 (you can read about the cover here).

Just for fun I’m showing the cover of every last issue of May from 1925 through 2015, one from each decade.

May 30, 1925: Ilonka Karasz; May 25, 1935: Constantin Alajalov; May 26, 1945: Constantin Alajalov; May 28, 1955: A. Birnbaum; May 29, 1965: Arthur Getz; May 26, 1975: Robert Tallon; May 27, 1985: Gretchen Dow Simpson; May 29, 1995: Mark Ulriksen; May 30, 2005: Peter de Seve; May 25, 2015: Carter Goodrich

And now to the new issue.

From the Department of Just Sayin’ : There are 18 cartoons and 17 illustrations (3 of the illustrations are full page)…  Rea Irvin’s classic  Talk of The Town Masthead is still a-missin’. It’s a thing of beauty. This is what it looks like:

I’m going to mention just one drawing from this issue (if you want critical writing on the cartoons I suggest you head over to Cartoon Companion, where each drawing is discussed and rated from 1 – 6).  Charlie Hankin’s drawing (it’s on page 61) reminded me of Jack Ziegler’s work. That of course is a very good thing. Mr. Hankin gives us a lovely (and large) drawing of the Metropolitan Opera House —  obviously there’s more to it than that; you can see it here, along with all the other drawings in the issue.  Mr. Ziegler’s was a cartoon world created to amuse himself; his way-out-there graphic and humorous takes on just about everything were his cartoon calling card. It’s good to see someone (Mr. Hankin in this case) give us such a fun drawing to look at and live with.

Finally, some paperwork.  A new cartoonist in this issue:  Jessica Olien.   If my record keeping is correct, Ms. Olien is the 15th new cartoonist — the 4th this year — brought on board since Emma Allen took charge of the magazine’s Cartoon Department in May of 2017.

Here’s the list of cartoonists in this week’s issue:

You might notice a co-credited cartoon: Kaamaran Hafeez and Al Batt.  It’s not the first time a cartoonist has shared credit with a gagwriter, but it’s still a rarity. 

— See you next week