The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of February 10, 2020

The Cover: a photographer. Go here to read a short Q&A with the cover artist, Malika Favre. 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:  Random thoughts on just a few of the dozen drawings in the issue

Two New Yorker Cartoon Gods in this issue: Sam Gross and Edward Koren. Mr. Gross, who has the lead cartoon in the issue — and what a great drawing it is! — has been contributing since 1969.  Mr. Koren has been contributing his fab work, covers and drawings, since 1962.

…the issue’s second drawing — it’s by Emily Bernstein — features a fiery ball heading for Earth (a meteor? Guess it doesn’t matter exactly what it is. What it is for certain is trouble). It’s the second fiery ball about to crash into Earth drawing in the magazine within the past three issues (Jessica Olien had one in the issue of January 27th). Is the fiery ball about to hit Earth the new crash test dummy scenario?  These aren’t the first published by the magazine — my hope is they won’t be the last. Can’t wait to see what colleagues do with it (haven’t tried one yet myself, but the day is young).

…I really like Mike Twohy’s personal info drawing (p. 36). He employs a little used (anymore)  folksinger scenario. I’m always reminded, seeing a folksinger drawing, of the one below by the late, exceptionally great, Charles Saxon. I first saw it in The New Yorker Album Of Drawings 1925-1975  (I started my collection with that Album). The drawing originally appeared as a full page in The New Yorker issue of January 24, 1970.

…Jeremy Nguyen’s drawing (p. 38) deals with an issue  — table wobble — most of us have dealt with at one time or another. A fun intricate well-executed drawing…

…J.A.K.’s octopus on page 42 brought to mind an on-the-spot cartoon fact-checking moment I experienced in front of an auditorium filled with school children about a decade ago. I’d just drawn an octopus on a large pad of paper. The school principal, standing onstage with me, came over and, counting aloud — a teaching moment — made sure I’d drawn all eight arms (I had). Mr. Katzenstein has drawn all eight arms as well (yes, I counted).

The Rea Irvin Missing Talk Masthead Watch

Rea Irvin, The New Yorker‘s art supervisor who gave us the magazine’s inaugural cover featuring Eustace Tilley, designed the above masthead. It sat in place for 92 years before being replaced in 2017 by a re-draw (heavens!). Read about it here. The magazine’s 95th anniversary issue, out next week, would be the perfect occasion to return Mr. Irvin’s iconic design.

 

 

 

 

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

David Preston’s Three New Yorker Covers

This grey day seemed like a good time to recall David Preston’s three New Yorker covers — all of them from the pre-buzz era when “quiet” New Yorker covers were plentiful. Below is Mr. Preston’s bio as it appeared at the 2015 Westport Historical Society exhibit, Cover Story: The New Yorker In Westport.

And here, courtesy of Sarah Geraghty Herndon, is a photo from late 1965 taken at James Geraghty’s home in Westport, Connecticut.  Mr. Preston is seated far right. Standing next to Mr. Preston is Charles Saxon. Partially obscured behind the young fellow in the white shirt is Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Further info from the Spill‘s A-Z:

Whitney Darrow, Jr. Born August 22, 1909, Princeton, NJ. Died August, 1999, Burlington, Vermont. New Yorker work: 1933 -1982. Quote (Darrow writing of himself in the third person): …in 1931 he moved to New York City, undecided between law school and doing cartoons as a profession. The fact that the [New Yorker’s] magazine offices were only a few blocks away decided him…” (Quote from catalogue, Meet the Artist, 1943)

Charles Saxon (Born in Brooklyn, NY,  Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

 

James Geraghty * (photo: Geraghty in his office at The New Yorker, 25 West 43rd St., 1948. Used with permission of Sarah Geraghty Herndon). Born Spokane, Washington, 1904. died Venice, Florida, January, 1983. While not a cartoonist, Geraghty’s contribution to the art of the New Yorker was substantial. He contributed material to cartoonists before and during his association with The New Yorker, where he served as art editor from 1939 until 1973, when the title passed to Lee Lorenz. In Geraghty’s NYTs obit (Jan 20, 1983), William Shawn said: “Along with Harold Ross, who was the first editor of the magazine, Geraghty set the magazine’s comic art on its course and he helped determine the direction in which the comic art would go and is still going.”

____________________________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Mort Gerberg on politics and news. Mr. Gerberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1965.

Visit his website here.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of October 28, 2019

The Cover: Trick or treaters in the woods courtesy of Liniers. To me, the creatures appearing in this cover seem to be above-sea-level up-in-the-trees relatives of Ed Steed’s August 26th cover’s creatures. I’m reminded of the fun fans had years ago by hunting for The Beatles faces on the cover of The Rolling Stones album, Their Satanic Majesties Request.

Details from each below, with Mr. Steed’s fabulous creatures on the left and Mr. Linier’s on the right:

                                          The Cartoonists And Cartoons

A number of cartoons to mention this time around beginning with David Sipress’s alien being at the eye doctor’s office (the drawing is on page 29). It’s a clean, clear drawing with an excellent caption. The second I saw it it became my all-time favorite Sipress cartoon (applause, applause)…

…The same applause goes to Ed Steed’s dog at a typewriter (p.56). It’s a captionless drawing that excels because of words, or more specifically one word repeated twenty-two times.  As a bonus,  the drawing has been placed beautifully on the page. It too has risen in status to at least my co-all-time favorite in the Steed canon. Great drawing…

…Roz Chast’s drawing (p. 61) immediately brought to mind this hilarious scene from Jerry Lewis’s 1985 movie “Cracking Up” — Zane Busby is the waitress…

…I wonder how many New Yorker readers will be Googling “Gowanus” after looking at Paul Karasik’s drawing (p.28).  The same cartoon happily led me to thinking about this scene from Monty Python’s “Holy Grail”…

…Really enjoyed Lars Kenseth’s good humored and practical dad reassuring his son (p. 34)…

…Frank Cotham’s drawing (p.66) is another which has instantly become a favorite. It reminds me somehow of Charles Saxon’s best work (which is to say, a large percentage of Saxon’s seven hundred and twenty-five New Yorker drawings). Love the mood of the drawing plus its triumphal caption.  Applause Applause…

…Also much fun is Barbara Smaller’s  city dwellers politically flavored Halloween cartoon (p.17). Ms. Smaller sets a fab scene with details galore: the port-hole elevator door window, the number of locks on the apartment door, the taped-up paper pumpkin on the door…and let’s not forget the dandy caption.

The Rea Irvin Talk Of The Town Masthead Watch

The above heading by the great New Yorker artist Rea Irvin sat atop the New Yorker‘s Talk Of The Town for ninety-two years until being removed and replaced by a redrawn(!) version in the Spring of 2017. Here’s hoping the powers that be (or power that be) reverses the situation. Read more here.

 

Photos & Video Of Interest: The Asian Babies Exhibit; Attempted Bloggery: A Saxon Drawing Done In By A Fact-Check?

Below, photos from Friday’s celebratory party for the up and running exhibit, Asian Babies: Works From Asian New Yorker Cartoonists at Pearl River Mart.  The exhibit runs til January 12, 2020.

     

Above, left to right: New Yorker cartoonists Jeremy Nguyen, Christine Mi, Amy Hwang, Suerynn Lee, and President of Pearl River Mart, Joanne Kwong.  Ms. Hwang and Mr. Nguyen co-curated  the exhibit.

 

Emma Allen, the magazine’s cartoon editor was in attendance as well as these New Yorker cartoonists: Johnny Dinapoli, Tim Hamilton, Maggie Jane Larson, Sofia Warren, Ellis Rosen, Joe Dator, and David Ostow.  Also there: Nicolette Leung Renz, granddaughter of New Yorker cartoonist Monroe Leung*

And There’s Video!… NY1 covered the opening. Here’s a link to the video piece.

*The Spill‘s A-Z entry for Mr. Leung:

Monroe Leung New Yorker work: one drawing, January 22, 1949.  Born, 1915, Los Angeles, California.  Died 2004, Los Angeles. According to his daughter, Mr. Leung was one of the first published Chinese American cartoonists. Mr. Leung served in WWII in the 360th Army Air Force Band (as a drummer) and assigned to the 18th Army Air Force Base Unit, the First Motion Picture Unit in Hollywood to draw cartoons for the Air Force. He went on to a profession of architectural rendering (in watercolor) for several advertising companies in Los Angeles. Mr. Leung’s method for submitting cartoons: “As soon as I draw up a few cartoons, I show my dear wife, Rosie. If she laughs, I send them to the magazines. If she thinks they’re lousy, I send them anyway.” (all information as well as the photo courtesy of Mr. Leung’s daughter).

_______________________________________________________

Attempted Bloggery: A Saxon Drawing Killed By A Fact-Check?

Did a Syd Hoff drawing do in this Saxon drawing? Read Attempted Bloggery for more

“Live” New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers And David Remnick; A Saxon In Stockbridge; Mon., Tues. Wed.’s Daily Cartoonists & Cartoons

“Live” New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers & David Remnick

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick joins Seth Meyers for the 8th installment of “Live New Yorker Cartoons.” Cartoons by: Ben Schwartz, John McNamee, Maddie Dai, Ed Steed, and Drew Panckeri.  Watch here.

 

_____________________________________________________

A Saxon In Stockbridge

If you happen into The Red Lion Inn in Stockbridge, Massachusetts as I did this afternoon, you’ll find an original Charles Saxon drawing hanging on a hallway wall just off the Inn’s pub. According to The New Yorker database it doesn’t appear to have been in the magazine. No matter — it’s a lovely drawing (what Saxon drawing isn’t?).  –photo by Bruce Crocker

Mr. Saxon’s entry on The Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Saxon (self portrait above left from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. New Yorker work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

_________________________________________________-

Catching Up With The Daily Cartoon Cartoonists & Daily Shouts Cartoonists

Today’s Daily is by Teresa Burns Parkhurst, yesterday’s Daily was by David Sipress, and Monday’s was by J.A.K..

Today’s Daily Shouts...“What Your Followers Were Really Saying When They Liked Your Post” by Tom Chitty and Irving Ruan. Monday’s was by Emily Flake.