The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 10, 2018

The Issue: Ah, the Edward Gorey special issue! Juuuust kidding, folks. It’s not a “special” issue of any kind. I’m going to go out on a limb though and suggest that this may be the very first cover story issue of The New Yorker.* [and within minutes of posting this, Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery, has corrected me, thankfully!].  If I’m wrong, let me know (it’s possible this may have happened in the Tina Brown era, but I cannot recall the issue). Historically the magazine’s cover has not reflected content (think especially of the famous issue of August 31, 1946 — the issue containing all of John Hersey’s Hiroshima. Charles E. Martin’s  birds eye view cover of folks going about summertime leisure activities offers no hint of what reading awaits inside the magazine. 

Although that tradition has been eased at times in recent years, usually due to the so-called special issues, or a very big story in the news, the reading inside (and/or the cartoons) is in relatively small parcels.  So to be clear, here is what I mean by “first cover story issue”:  the cover (by Edward Gorey) is mirrored by a significant article on Mr. Gorey inside the magazine (the piece is by Joan Acocella, the magazine’s dance critic). I do not recall ever seeing a New Yorker cover by an artist, or about an individual, carrying over inside the magazine in a significant way.  “Significant” is the key word here (you can tell it’s significant because I’ve now used the word four times). Six pages on Gorey, including a full page photograph, and an example of his work — 2 examples, if you include the cover — qualify as, well, you know… significant (now used five times).  As always, I welcome corrections, amplification, disagreements, denials.

This week’s cartoonists:

This week’s illustrations: there are 22 illustrations (that includes photos) with 4 1/2 full pages, and a six page spread with each page half given over to illustrations by Bill Bragg (so six half pages = 3 full).  So really 7 1/2 full pages of illustration.

Still missing: Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead (shown below) hasn’t been seen for quite some time now in the magazine (since the issue of May 22, 2017 to be exact). For a small recap of its disappearance, link here.

*Stephen Nadler has pointed out the Tina Brown era issue of October 22, 1992 as the first cover story.  Josh Gosfield’s cover of Malcolm X, is followed inside by a lengthy piece by Marshall Frady. My thanks to Mr. Nadler.

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online; More Spills: A Charles E. Martin (CEM) Comic Strip, An Exhibit Down South

Gee whiz, it seems like the Olympics happened months ago, but last Monday’s Daily Cartoon by Pia Guerra reminds us that the torch was extinguished just a week ago. After the torch cartoon it seemed* to be all politics on the Daily, with work by Ellis Rosen, Julia Suits, Brendan Loper, and Peter Kuper.

*Ms. Suits’ drawing might be construed as political, but then again, it might not be.

Over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Julia Wertz, Barbara Smaller, Christian Lowe, and special guest, Colin Stokes (Mr. Stokes is the New Yorker‘s Assistant Cartoon Editor and a co-author of at least one published New Yorker cartoon).

All of the work mentioned above, and more, can be found here.

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…From The Stripper’s Guide, February 28, 2018, “Obscurity of the Day: The Scuttles”  —  a look at a single panel comic strip by Charles E. Martin, before he became a regular New Yorker contributor (covers and cartoons).

Mr. Martin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles E. Martin ( CEM) (photo left above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon. Photo right, courtesy of Roxie Munro; a CEM New Yorker cover, July 18, 1977) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. New Yorker work: 1938 – 1987.

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…If you’re down south you might seek out the Matthew Diffee exhibit at the Hickory Museum of Art.  It runs through July 8th.  Info here.  

 

Alan Dunn (& Charles E. Martin) & The Guggenheim

From The Guggenheim’s website, June 6, 2017, “This New Yorker Cartoon Documented the Guggenheim’s 1959 Opening”read all about it here (Alan Dunn’s spread ran in the issue of November 28, 1959)

If you need more New Yorker cartoonists weighing in on the Guggenheim  there’s always this collection from 2005 —  The New Yorker Visits the Guggenheim.  According to the publisher: “This book brings together five decades worth of cartoons and cover illustrations that feature the iconic museum, along with period photographs that reveal the artists’ inspirations.”

The Guggenheim has been on the cover of The New Yorker a number of times, including this beauty from Charles E. Martin (CEM) in January of 1970.

 

 

Here’s Alan Dunn’s entry on the A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. New Yorker work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

And here’s Charles E. Martin’s A-Z entry:

Charles E. Martin ( CEM) (photo left above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon. Photo right, courtesy of Roxie Munro) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. New Yorker work: 1938 – 1987.

Blast From the Past: A New Yorker Olympics Cover and Cartoon From 1960

Kovarsky olympics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker has published a number of Olympic themed covers and drawings in its lifetime (the issue currently on the newsstands is the most recent example with its Olympics cover and spot drawings ). Here’s Anatol Kovarsky’s beautiful New Yorker cover celebrating the 1960 Summer Olympics.  And inside the magazine, this Charles Martin (CEM) drawing:

CEM olympics

 

 

 

Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entries for Mr. Kovarsky and Mr. Martin:

Anatol Kovarsky (photo above, NYC, 2013.  By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC.  Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) NYer work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s Anatol Kovarsky appreciation 

Charles E. Martin (CEM) (photo above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. NYer work: Nearly 200 covers and over 400 cartoons, 1938 – 1987.

Website of Interest: CEM (Charles E. Martin); Chris Weyant’s Boston Daily Cartoon

Here’s a link to a website devoted to the work of Charles E. Martin, better known to the New Yorker readership as CEM. Martin, who died in 1995 at the age of 85, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1938 (his first appearance was a cover). He went on to create nearly two hundred more covers for the magazine as well as just over four hundred cartoons. The website features a short film about his life.

(thanks to Liam Walsh for the link)

 

And in case you missed it: here’s Chris Weyant on Bob Mankoff’s weekly New Yorker blog speaking about the Daily Cartoon he created following the tragedy in Boston.