The Wednesday Watch: Visiting Addams Hometown; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Shannon Wheeler’s Next Book; A Liana Finck Daily Shouts

Visiting Addams Hometown

From slashfilm.com, August 14, 2019, “We Visited the Creepy and Kooky Birthplace of the Addams Family”

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Statue Of Liberty poem by Peter Kuper, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2011. Visit his website here.

 

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Shannon Wheeler’s Next Book

Too Much Coffee Man: The Before Years, out March 2020, is the latest from Mr. Wheeler who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009. About the book, from the publisher, Dark Horse Books:

Featuring decades of strips and comics with new sequential work connecting and commenting on each era, Wheeler analyzes formative periods in his life as a creator. College-era strips early in his cartooning career are mixed with new stories and gag comics to create a narrative arc that leads to Wheeler’s work on Postage Stamp Funnies and Villain House! Fans of Wheeler and the art of cartooning will enjoy this super-caffeinated collection detailing the origin of his most famous creation and his journey from cartooning for free for college papers to making a bit more money at The Onion, and ultimately making just a little bit more at The New Yorker–the apex job for a cartoonist!

Visit Mr. Wheeler’s website here.

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A Liana Finck Daily Shouts

Another installment of Liana Finck’s “Dear Pepper.”  She began contributing to The New Yorker in 2013. Visit her website here.

Addams Family Trailer; The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Duffy’s Strip Celebrates Its 30th

Addams Family Trailer

Here’s the official first trailer for the animated film out October 11th.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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The Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

 Amy Hwang on central a/c. Ms. Hwang’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Born, Arlington, Texas, 1978. New Yorker work: November 8, 2010 –. Ms. Hwang’s website

 

 

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J.C. Duffy’s Strip Celebrates Its 30th

From The Daily Cartoonist, August 7, 2019, “The Fusco Brothers At 30 (Not -30-)”

Joe Duffy’s strip celebrates its 30th anniversary. Mr. Duffy’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

J.C. Duffy  New Yorker work: November 9, 1998 – .Website:www.cartoonistgroup.com/properties/fuscobros/home.php

 

 

 

A Non-Chas Addams Drawn Addams Family Comic Book This Fall; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; McPhail’s Graphic Review

From IDW, news of a one-shot Addams Family comic book this fall. Read about it here on Newsarama (includes the IDW press release).

 Worth noting that the drawings in this upcoming comic book will look like the ones above left, not the ones on the right, drawn by Addams.

Mr. Addams entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Charles Addams (Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A fly, a frog, and airspace, by Lars Kenseth, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

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Will McPhail’s Graphic Review

From The New York Times, July 19, 2019, “A Recipe For ‘Heartburn'”

— Will McPhail’s graphic review of Nora Ephron’s Heartburn. Mr. McPhail began contributing to The New Yorker in 2014.  Visit his website here.

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of July 22, 2019

The Cover:    As you can see by the puzzled fellow icon, I am a little puzzled (though not completely puzzled) by Christoph Niemann’s Geico-esque subway cover for the July 15th issue. Luckily, there’s the go-to weekly Q&A for those in need of clarity.

The Cartoonists:

The Newbie: Madeline Horwath debuts this week.  She is the 21st new New Yorker cartoonist this year and the 47th to join the magazine’s stable under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship (begun in May of 2017).

The Cartoons: A first impression after going through the magazine was the number of cartoons afforded generous space. Not too small, not too big, just right.  

A Selection Of The Magazine’s Moon covers: In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11, there’s a page of four New Yorker covers by four artists: Charles Addams, Charles E. Martin (C.E.M.), Laura Jean Allen, and John O’Brien. But let’s not forget Alajalov, whose three Moon-centric covers perhaps qualifies him as King Of The Moon Covers.

Rea Irvin: How wonderful would it be to see Mr. Irvin’s Talk masthead return to the place it held for 92 years Until then, here’s Joe Starrett’s famous last line in Shane:“Shane! Shane! Come Back!”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some Favorite Summertime New Yorker Covers

This hot and humid long 4th of July weekend makes me think of specific favorite summertime New Yorker covers. The choices are good and plenty when one decides to select a few favorites from the magazine’s 94 years; for every one shown here, there are at least five more that fall into the fave category — these half dozen are but a fraction of the magazine’s superb summertime covers.

It’s perhaps worth noting that each of the artists below contributed both cartoons and covers to The New Yorker. They all hail from the pre-Tina Brown days when more than 60% of the magazine’s covers were contributed by its cartoonists (a reasonable guess would be that the % now of the magazine’s cartoonists contributing covers is somewhere in the low single digits).

This August 4th 1945 Mary Petty cover has always been a first thought when summer arrives.  The simple quiet moment Ms. Petty gives us during a particularly horrendous moment in history has always fascinated me. This scan doesn’t do justice to Ms. Petty’s watercolors.

Whenever I think of summertime and beaches I think of this Ludwig Bemelmans July 13, 1946  cover. Most will think of Mr. Bemelmans and immediately recall his Madeline books, but his contribution of 32 New Yorker covers was substantial

Here’s a beauty by Anatol Kovarsky from August 2, 1969. If you look through Mr. Kovarsky’s New Yorker covers you’ll see he often returned to aerial views. I’ve always found it amusing that he focused here on the parking lot, with the beach and ocean as supporting players.

Charles Addams’s cover shown below was published the very next week after Mr. Kovarsky’s. It reminds me of the summers during the years I lived in Manhattan, especially the days I headed up to The New Yorker‘s office to drop off my weekly batch of cartoons. The city never seemed hotter, the sidewalks never stickier, the non-air conditioned subway cars never sootier, than on those trips between my apartment in Greenwich Village and 25 West 43rd Street.

 

There are so many wonderful New Yorker baseball covers, but this one by Garrett Price is a particular favorite. 

Finally, this spectacular July 4th 1953 cover by Alajalov.

Here are the Spill’s A-Z entries for each of the above artists. 

 

 

 

 

Mary Petty  Born, Hampton, New Jersey, April 29, 1899. Died, Paramus, New Jersey, March, 1976. New Yorker work: October 22, 1927 – March 19, 1966. Collection: This Petty Place ( Knopf, 1945) with a Preface by James Thurber.

 

Ludwig Bemelmans  Born, April 27, 1898. Died, October 1, 1962. New Yorker work: contributed six cartoons and thirty-two covers as well written pieces in a New Yorker career that began in October of 1937 and lasted until August 1962. He achieved lasting fame with his Madeline childrens books.

 

 

Anatol Kovarsky (photo: NYC, 2013. By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC. Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) New Yorker work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s  2013 piece, “Anatol Kovarsky at 94: Still Drawing After All These Years”

 

 

Charles Addams  Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

Garrett Price ( Photo Source: Esquire Cartoon Album, 1957) Born, 1897, Bucyrus, Kansas. Died, April, 1979, Norwalk, Conn. Collection: Drawing Room Only / A Book of Cartoons (Coward -McCann, 1946). New Yorker work: 1925 -1974.

 

 

Constantin Alajalov  Born Constantin Aladjalov, 1900, Rostov-on-the-Don, Russia. Died Oct., 1987, Amenia, New York. New Yorker work: 1926 -1960. Perhaps best known for his New Yorker covers ( he also supplied cover art to other publications). Key collection: Conversation Pieces (The Studio Publications Inc., 1942) w/ commentary by Janet Flanner. A profile from The Saturday Evening Post.