Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price; Liza Donnelly In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Kodak’s Cartoon Campaign With Addams, Steig, And George Price

Stephen Nadler’s latest Attempted Bloggery post shows us some wonderful work by three New Yorker cartoon gods: Charles Addams, William Steig and George Price. See all the ads here.

The artists entries on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

William Steig (photo above) Born in Brooklyn, NY, Nov. 14, 1907, died in Boston, Mass., Oct. 3, 2003. In a New Yorker career that lasted well over half a century and a publishing history that contains more than a cart load of books, both children’s and otherwise, it’s impossible to sum up Steig’s influence here on Ink Spill. He was among the giants of the New Yorker cartoon world, along with James Thurber, Saul Steinberg, Charles Addams, Helen Hokinson and Peter Arno. Lee Lorenz’s World of William Steig (Artisan, 1998) is an excellent way to begin exploring Steig’s life and work. NYer work: 1930 -2003.

George Price (above) Born in Coytesville, New Jersey, June 9, 1901. Died January 12, 1995, Engelwood, New Jersey. New Yorker work: 1929 – 1991. Lee Lorenz, the New Yorker’s former Art/Cartoon editor, called Price one of the magazine’s great stylists (along with Peter Arno, Helen Hokinson, James Thurber, and William Steig. Of the many Price collections here are two favorites:  Browse At Your Own Risk (1977), and The World of George Price: A 55-Year Retrospective (1988)

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Liza Donnelly To Speak In Walt Disney’s Hometown

Ms. Donnelly, who’s work has appeared in The New Yorker since 1982, will speak this week at Toonfest in Marceline, Missouri, Walt Disney’s hometown.

 

 

Move Over Addams, Steinberg Did An 89 Foot Long Mural; Dick Buchanan’s Tip Of The Hat To Funny Ladies At The New Yorker Show, and …A First Glimpse of the Exhibit

Steinberg’s 89 Foot Mural

We recently learned of a fourteen foot mural Charles Addams executed (a good Addamsy word!); well here’s a piece in Cincinnati Magazine about an eighty-nine foot Steinberg mural.  Wowzers.

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Dick Buchanan’s Tip Of The Hat To Funny Ladies At The New Yorker

Via Mike Lynch’s site: “From The Dick Buchanan Files: Women Cartoonists: Barbara Shermund, Hilda Terry, Mary Gibson, and Dorothy McKay 1935-1952”

Mr. Buchanan’s latest file finds are in honor of the upcoming Society of Illustrators exhibit, Funny Ladies At The New Yorker: Cartoonists Then and Now

Liza Donnelly, who curated the show, has posted (on Instagram) a preview photo. Nice blow-up of a Helen Hokinson drawing! : 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The (double) New Yorker Issue of July 9 & 16, 2018

A dog in a flotation device on a very watery cover for a double issue in early-to-mid July. The artist Mark Ulriksen talks about his creation here.  My eye wants me to believe that Mr. Ulriksen’s doggie is floating in the air above the surface of marbeilized water.

A delayed Monday Tilley Watch as the digital issue has not yet turned over to July 9th & 16th (it’s still stuck on the issue of July 2nd). The Monday Watch came about because I thought it might be fun taking a look at the cartoons in situ. Without the digital issue today, that’s not possible (my print version won’t arrive for a few more days).

I can see all the cartoons on the newyorker.com slideshow, but for me, that’s less appealing than seeing how they reside on the magazine’s pages. I also love seeing what else is going on in the issue, graphically (such as: has Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead returned yet…you know, things like that).

— So long then, until I have access to the magazine, in one version or another. 

…the latest issue appeared online late Monday afternoon. 

Twelve cartoons in the issue.  Here’re the cartoonists:

Bruce Kaplan’s caption caught my eye this week, as well as his somewhat complex drawing.  Also catching my eye: the number of illustrations (drawings and photographs). There are eighteen with four of them full page (and one of those actually a page-and-a-half).

Usually I don’t mention the cartoon caption page, but I do like Joe Dator’s kites offered up this week. It has a Jack Ziegler feel to it. Perhaps Mr. Dator will reveal his caption (if there was one) once the contest is settled.

Of special note: a nice Charles Addams piece by the cartoonist, Paul Karasik (it appears under the “Sketchbook” heading).

For more on the issue’s cartoons check out the Cartoon Companion at week’s end.

Extra special note: Rea Irvin’s classic masthead is still missing. Here’s what it looks like:

— See you when the next new issue is out, July 16th…seems like a long way off!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s Too Darn Hot; Fave Photos of the Day: Chast & Wertz…Shanahan, Toro & Ziegler

Here’s a Liza Donnelly classic cartoon from The New Yorker issue of August 7, 1995:

And a favorite Charles Addams cover:

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Fave Photos of the Day: Roz Chast & Julia Wertz…Shanahan, Toro & Ziegler

Julia Wertz (on the left) and Roz Chast appeared at The New York Public Library last Thursday to discuss their work. I love that Ms. Chast is looking at a projected childhood photo of herself.  (photo courtesy of Marcie Jacobs-Cole). 

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And just last night up in Bennington, Vermont, Jessica Ziegler, the daughter of the late Jack Ziegler moderated a talk with Danny Shanahan and Tom Toro.  The photo below from an interesting article posted today by Mike Peterson on his Comic Strip of the Day. Mr. Shanahan is on the far left, Mr. Toro, center, and Ms. Ziegler far right.

 

 

 

 

Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Cover Exhibit Of Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics; Addams Hometown Throws Addams Fest in October

 Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Upcoming New Yorker covers are usually posted early Monday morning, but occasionally we get an advance look.  Barry Blitt is the cover artist for next week’s issue. 

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Exhibit Of  Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics

Opening today at the New York Transit Museum in downtown Brooklyn, this fabulous exhibit  comprised of “satirical cartoons, comic strips and comic books from the 19th to 21st centuries.” Works by over 120 artists are represented including the following New Yorker contributors: Roz Chast, Peter Kuper, Eric Drooker, Ben Katchor, Julia Wertz, and Art Young.  Along with the art, there will be panel discussions, gallery talks and sketch nights.

For all the info go here.

(cartoon courtesy of Peter Kuper)

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Addams Hometown Throws  Addams Fest in October

Mark your calendar: Charles Addams’ hometown will hold its first Addams Fest over three days in October (26, 27, and 28). Lectures, exhibits and screenings are planned.  Read about it here.

Above: a screen shot of a very short teaser video for the fest.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/