A New Charles Addams Collection!; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

An early afternoon trip to my local independent bookstore turned up a surprise: Addams’ Apple: The New York Cartoons of Charles Addams (Pomegranate); Foreword by Sarah M. Henry (deputy director and chief curator at The Museum of The City of New York) and Preface by Luc Sante (author, Guggenheim Fellow, and teacher at Bard College).

Most appealing to me about this themed collection — and the reason I bought it — are the eight previously unpublished Addams pieces — one of them a color piece, obviously intended as a New Yorker cover, titled “Green City” — it’s dated 1979. While most of the work included was published in The New Yorker, a good number previously appeared only in Addams cartoon collections. A few others (seven, if my counting is correct) appeared via the McClure Syndicate; a couple appeared in The New York Times.

I love that the book includes more than a dozen color plates of New Yorker covers. Addams’ covers are masterpieces of the form. There’s a really nice photo of Addams, taken in his studio as he’s working on a New Yorker cover published October 31, 1983 (it is, of course, included in the book). In the photo, you see a sliding glass door hard by his drawing table. Seen through the glass, out on the lawn, are a couple of Addams’ dogs sniffing around.

The Spill doesn’t rate cartoons, or cartoonists, or books of cartoons, but  occasionally it breaks into a round of applause.

 

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoons

Ellis Rosen on yesterday’s political drama. Mr. Rosen began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit his website here.

 

 

The Weekend Spill: A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At The Magazine’s 6th Anniversary Issue; From Swann Galleries: The Rise Of Illustration Art In The Public Eye

A New Yorker State Of Mind Looks At the Magazine’s 6th Anniversary Issue

A fave Spill blog, A New Yorker State Of Mind: Reading Every Issue Of The New Yorker takes us deep into the magazine’s 6th anniversary issue.  Lots to see, to read. Enjoy!

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Of Interest: The Rise Of Illustration Art In The Public Eye

From Swann Galleries, this short piece “The Rise Of Illustration Art In The Public Eye” which includes a few recently auctioned pieces, including Charles Addams‘s so-called “movie scream” (above), Ludwig Bemelmans and Ilonka Karasz.

Looking ahead: It’s always fun browsing through Swann’s Illustration Art auction catalog at the New Yorker cartoons and covers up for grabs — we’ll have to wit til Spring though.

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 13, 2020

A few thoughts on the art in the latest issue of The New Yorker…

The Cover: a moment in a museum, courtesy of Bruce McCall (read a Q&A with him here). The second cover in a row with ( for me) a retro feel to it. I could see Charles Addams doing something like this, or the late great Richard Taylor (Mr. Taylor’s January 9, 1937 cover appears below right).

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A lively bunch of cartoons: 18 of them — 19 if you include Olivia de Recat’s “Sketchpad” on page 17.  Possibly my imagination, but it appears most every cartoon has breathing space this week. There’s not one that looks cramped, nor is there one that looks like it would’ve been better off in a smaller space. Victoria Roberts’s peas in a pod (on page 21) is an excellent example of a drawing that required and received ample space.

P.C. Vey’s drawing (it’s on page 23) surprised me (always a very good thing). His unusual graveyard scenario accompanied by a terrif caption is a treat.

I like the sextet of cartoons that begins on page 40: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell’s burning shorts drawing; Charlie Hankin’s magician (p.43); Lars Kenseth’s Charles Addamsy stomped-on cigarette butt drawing (p.44); Liana Finck’s sedentary whale (p.48); Sharon Levy’s abominable snowperson (p. 52) — which reminds me, pockets-wise of Arnie Levin’s great drawing (shown below) from the issue of December 26, 1977.  And, lastly, Ed Steed’s funny off-the-tracks drawing (p. 55).

Two drawings elsewhere in the issue also caught my eye: the fab P.S. Mueller’s drawing (p.65) with its use of the word “subsequent”… and Ellie Black’s dragon drawing (p.29). Hey, what can I say — I really like drawings of dragons, castles, etc..

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead remains under wraps. I don’t know how much effort it would take to return it to its proper place, but surely it can’t be more than a few clicks on a keyboard.

Read about Mr. Irvin’s masthead here, and see it below:

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 6, 2020

The Cover: A retro cover! When I saw this attractive cover I immediately placed its style and structure in the early 1960s, and thought of a particular artist: the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, Arthur Getz. To illustrate, here’s Mr. Getz’s cover from December 18, 1965 side-by-side with this new one by Pascal Campion.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Some random thoughts on a few of the cartoons in The New Yorker‘s first issue of the 2020s…

There’s a duo effort by Jose Arroyo and Rob Kutner. Mr. Arroyo first began contributing to the magazine in 2008. Mr. Kutner is a comedy writer.

Really like Suerynn Lee’s breadcrumbs-on-a-trail drawing (it’s on page 28) — graphically appealing with a strong caption. Of the breadcrumbs-on-a-trail themed New Yorker cartoons over the years, here’s a favorite from the great Arnie Levin, published May 22, 2000.

Zach Kanin’s mounted python (on p. 36) is a hoot (or a “ssssssss”).  Mr. Kanin’s drawings always seem (to me) to contain some kind of Charles Addamsy-ish dna, which is a very good thing.

Can’t see a dog at a computer cartoon, such as Elisabeth’s McNair’s (p. 34) without thinking of  Peter Steiner‘s celebrated New Yorker drawing published July 5, 1993:  “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” It remains the most republished New Yorker drawing in modern history.

Joe Dator’s procrastinating writer cartoon (p. 39) is fun. The length of the caption — and the time it takes to read it —  becomes another element of delay.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Last Monday, in this space, I held out the faint hope we might see Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead return to kick off the new year and decade. No dice. The redraw — plopped-in in the Spring of 2017 — is back after Ed Steed’s fun one-off in last week’s “Cartoon Takeover” issue.  Read more about the masthead here, and, as always (until something changes for the better… or worse!), here’s Mr. Irvin’s classic (sadly moth-balled) masthead…

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 16, 2019; The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

A Look At Some Of The Cartoonists & Cartoons In The Latest Issue Of The New Yorker

The Cover: What looks suspiciously like a UPS deliveryman is carrying a fully decorated Christmas tree up the steps of a city brownstone. The deliveryman seems to have something in his mouth. A peach? A corn muffin? Or, possibly an ornament that fell off the tree? I was hoping the answer would be found here, in this short Q&A with Peter De Seves — the cover artist, but alas…

[Update on what’s in the deliveryman’s mouth: A friend of the Spill‘s has pointed out that there’s nothing in the deliveryman’s mouth. The way it appears on my laptop screen it appears there is, but upon very close inspection I can see that the thin line of the mouth forms what appears to be the top of a circle. The circular lines of the shaved-chin fill out a circle suggesting a ball-shape. The beard surrounding the ball-shape framed a circle.  Once I saw it, I couldn”t un-see it (even now).  I think too that the ball shape I’m seeing is nearly identical to the Christmas tree balls hanging close-by. The power of suggestion then, perhaps? Anywho, I stand corrected. My thanks to Attempted Bloggery]

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

…A healthy number of cartoons in The New Yorker’s almost last issue of the year.

…The duo of Pia Guerra and Ian Boothbay have contributed a very Charles Addams(y) drawing. It reminded me, structurally, of this Addams drawing from The New Yorker issue of April 28, 1980:

…The Mike Twohy drawing (on page 27) incorporates a semi-popular cartoonist go-to scenario: the large snake that’s swallowed something. A fairly recent example is this Jason Adam Katzenstein drawing for the issue of May 1, 2017. A sampling of others who’ve visited the big snake that’s swallowed something include Sam Gross, Farley Katz, and Ariel Molvig.

…Two other drawings that caught my eye: Peter Kuper’s couple in bed on page 47, and Joseph Dottini’s party scene on page 74.  As mentioned numerous times on the Monday Tilley Watch, it’s the unexpected drawing (ideally both caption and drawing) that keeps me hovering over a cartoon longer than usual.  Both these caused me to hover. A Spill round of applause for Mr. Kuper’s and Mr. Dottini’s work in this issue.

…A drawing by Ed Steed (it’s on on page 67) has caused me to resurrect a listing I started in 2008 on newyorker.com “Some Favorite Things.”   I wrote by way of introducing the list:

Everyone has favorites: flavors of ice cream, baseball teams, nieces and nephews. I have favorite cartoon elements. Like fingerprints, these elements are unique to a cartoonist’s work.

And then I went on to list a bunch of favorite elements. Here’s a sampling:

Bruce Eric Kaplan’s slanted rooms

P. C. Vey’s stiff-legged people

Jack Ziegler’s kids and dogs, and his men’s clothing

Sam Gross’ cats and mice

Well after seeing this latest drawing by Mr. Steed, I’d like to add:

 Ed Steed’s horses

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  No news isn’t good news. Mr. Irvin’s beautiful masthead, (removed in the Spring of 2017 and replaced by a re-draw) is still gathering dust. For those who miss it, here it is:

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The New Yorker Cartoon Caption Contest, Now On Instagram Stories

The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen has announced a new cartoon caption contest feature. Read about it here. The feature begins with this week’s contest cartoon.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Avi Steinberg on the risk of making friends during the holidays. Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.