The Tilley Watch Online; More Spills: A Charles E. Martin (CEM) Comic Strip, An Exhibit Down South

Gee whiz, it seems like the Olympics happened months ago, but last Monday’s Daily Cartoon by Pia Guerra reminds us that the torch was extinguished just a week ago. After the torch cartoon it seemed* to be all politics on the Daily, with work by Ellis Rosen, Julia Suits, Brendan Loper, and Peter Kuper.

*Ms. Suits’ drawing might be construed as political, but then again, it might not be.

Over on Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Julia Wertz, Barbara Smaller, Christian Lowe, and special guest, Colin Stokes (Mr. Stokes is the New Yorker‘s Assistant Cartoon Editor and a co-author of at least one published New Yorker cartoon).

All of the work mentioned above, and more, can be found here.

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…From The Stripper’s Guide, February 28, 2018, “Obscurity of the Day: The Scuttles”  —  a look at a single panel comic strip by Charles E. Martin, before he became a regular New Yorker contributor (covers and cartoons).

Mr. Martin’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles E. Martin ( CEM) (photo left above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon. Photo right, courtesy of Roxie Munro; a CEM New Yorker cover, July 18, 1977) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. New Yorker work: 1938 – 1987.

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…If you’re down south you might seek out the Matthew Diffee exhibit at the Hickory Museum of Art.  It runs through July 8th.  Info here.  

 

The Monday Tilley Watch: The New Yorker Issue of November 27, 2017

The Monday Tilley Watch is a meandering take on the cartoons in the current issue of The New Yorker.

I’ve spent a little time this morning looking through New Yorker Thanksgiving covers over the years. My all-time favorite — it’s the only cover I ever detached from the magazine (for shame!) so I could hang it on the wall — was Steinberg’s from 1976 (the same year he produced the now iconic so-called view from New York cover). His Thanksgiving cover, to my way of thinking, was and is the New Yorker cover at its best (not including Rea Irvin’s very first cover) — and I believe it was Steinberg at his best.  Disagree with me if you’d like, but you’ll never change my mind.

There have been many other great New Yorker  Thanksgiving covers, so very many.  I saw some beauties this morning  by George Booth, one by Anatol Kovarsky, Arnie Levin, Peter Arno, Frank Modell(!), James Stevenson, CEM (Charles E. Martin), William Steig…and on and on.  Gems all. Someone should do a book of them.

This Monday Tilley Watch will be a little different than the ones that have come before. For most, this is a busy week, with a lot of rushing around.  I actually saw people rushing around while I was in a grocery store yesterday.  In that spirit (of rushing) I’m going to mention just five drawings in this new issue (there are 19, with a full page “Comic Strip” by Edward Steed making the total 20). For more on the others I suggest visiting the Cartoon Companion at week’s end [to those who have asked if the Spill is affiliated with the Companion, the answer is nay.  We’re in touch, but their numbered opinions are strictly their own]

And now on to the five:  the first is BEK’s (Bruce Eric Kaplan) drawing (it’s on page 39).  Wonderful caption, perfectly capturing the mood (for many) of the times.  Four pages later, on page 42, a terrific commuter drawing by David Sipress.  Mr. Sipress delivers a drawing that lives up to Peter Arno’s high-bar one-two punch test.  On the opposite page another winner by Liana Finck. She has a knack for taking us away in fairy tale situations. Moving on to page 76, a cartoon by the ever-reliable Paul Noth.  I love that Mr. Noth has put so much into his Thanksgiving football drawing.  Opposite the Noth cartoon, a feast for the eyes: an Edward Koren drawing. Mr. Koren is our longest active contributing artist, having first published in the New Yorker in 1962. 

The “mix” of these drawings is what has always been one of my favorite parts of that first look through every issue of the magazine. Great writing, combined with interesting, oft-times exceptional drawing.

Final notes: Regular Monday Tilley Watch readers perhaps have grown weary of my unrelenting campaign to bring back the Rea Irvin Talk of The Town masthead to the magazine.  Sorry to disappoint, but here it is again:

 To me, removing Mr. Irvin’s creation from the magazine is akin to removing the top of the Chrysler building and replacing it with the top of Philadelphia’s One Liberty Place :

Further note:  debut appearances in this week’s issue by Emma Hunsinger and Sofia Warren, bring the number of new cartoonists introduced under Emma Allen’s cartoon editorship to seven — an average of one new cartoonist a month (Ms. Allen began editing the cartoons this past May).  

 

Alan Dunn (& Charles E. Martin) & The Guggenheim

From The Guggenheim’s website, June 6, 2017, “This New Yorker Cartoon Documented the Guggenheim’s 1959 Opening”read all about it here (Alan Dunn’s spread ran in the issue of November 28, 1959)

If you need more New Yorker cartoonists weighing in on the Guggenheim  there’s always this collection from 2005 —  The New Yorker Visits the Guggenheim.  According to the publisher: “This book brings together five decades worth of cartoons and cover illustrations that feature the iconic museum, along with period photographs that reveal the artists’ inspirations.”

The Guggenheim has been on the cover of The New Yorker a number of times, including this beauty from Charles E. Martin (CEM) in January of 1970.

 

 

Here’s Alan Dunn’s entry on the A-Z:

Alan Dunn (self portrait above from Meet the Artist) Born in Belmar, New Jersey, August 11, 1900, died in New York City, 1975. New Yorker work: 1926 – 1974 Key collections: Rejections (Knopf, 1931), Who’s Paying For This Cab? (Simon & Schuster, 1945), A Portfolio of Social Cartoons ( Simon & Schuster, 1968). One of the most published New Yorker cartoonists (1,906 cartoons) , Mr. Dunn was married to Mary Petty — together they lived and worked at 12 East 88th Street, where, according to the NYTs, Alan worked “seated in a small chair at a card table, drawing in charcoal and grease pencil.”

And here’s Charles E. Martin’s A-Z entry:

Charles E. Martin ( CEM) (photo left above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon. Photo right, courtesy of Roxie Munro) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. New Yorker work: 1938 – 1987.

Blast From the Past: A New Yorker Olympics Cover and Cartoon From 1960

Kovarsky olympics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The New Yorker has published a number of Olympic themed covers and drawings in its lifetime (the issue currently on the newsstands is the most recent example with its Olympics cover and spot drawings ). Here’s Anatol Kovarsky’s beautiful New Yorker cover celebrating the 1960 Summer Olympics.  And inside the magazine, this Charles Martin (CEM) drawing:

CEM olympics

 

 

 

Ink Spill’s “New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z” entries for Mr. Kovarsky and Mr. Martin:

Anatol Kovarsky (photo above, NYC, 2013.  By Liza Donnelly) Born, Moscow. Died, June 1, 2016, NYC.  Collection: Kovarsky’s World (Knopf, 1956) NYer work: 1947 -1969. Link to Ink Spill’s Anatol Kovarsky appreciation 

Charles E. Martin (CEM) (photo above from Think Small, a cartoon collection produced by Volkswagon) Born in Chelsie, Mass., 1910, died June 18, 1995, Portland, Maine. NYer work: Nearly 200 covers and over 400 cartoons, 1938 – 1987.

Website of Interest: CEM (Charles E. Martin); Chris Weyant’s Boston Daily Cartoon

Here’s a link to a website devoted to the work of Charles E. Martin, better known to the New Yorker readership as CEM. Martin, who died in 1995 at the age of 85, began contributing to The New Yorker in 1938 (his first appearance was a cover). He went on to create nearly two hundred more covers for the magazine as well as just over four hundred cartoons. The website features a short film about his life.

(thanks to Liam Walsh for the link)

 

And in case you missed it: here’s Chris Weyant on Bob Mankoff’s weekly New Yorker blog speaking about the Daily Cartoon he created following the tragedy in Boston.