Peter Kuper’s Liberpress Award; Fave Photos Of The Day: Eckstein, Weyant and Borchart

Peter Kuper’s Liberpress Award

A hearty Spill congrats to Peter Kuper, who has won a Liberpress Award. 

From their website: LiberPress was created in Girona in 1999. It was set up with the aim of publicising and promoting what could be called the “culture of solidarity”. Its creation was intended to promote a movement based on solidarity and humanitarian values, which would involve the mass media.

Link here and here for more  info.

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Fave Photos Of The Day : Eckstein, Weyant, and Borchart

Bob Eckstein, Christopher Weyant, and David Borchart were on hand at this past weekend’s Milford Readers & Writers Fest.  Here are just a few photos showing the cartoonists up on the stage:

Above: The World’s Leading Authority on Snowmen, Bob Eckstein, with one of his drawings. Below: Mr. Weyant, on the left, and Mr. Borchart on the right.

Christopher Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

David Borchart began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

Bob Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

A Farewell To The Monday Tilley Watch

I’ve always felt slightly uneasy about the old saying, “The more things change, the more they remain the same.”  But for now it applies to my feelings about the Monday Tilley Watch. It began as an honest response to every new issue’s cartoons. And that was fun (for me)… for awhile. Lately it’s become more of a challenge to say what I want to say without actually saying it (If you can follow that, my hat is off to you). The Monday Tilley Watch  was never meant to be a critical platform, but I’m afraid it’s become one. Biting the hand that feeds me (it’s also a hand I love) gives me no pleasure. And so, beginning today, I’m deconstructing the Monday Tilley Watch. On Mondays I’ll still chime in, from time-to-time, about the latest issue.  But mostly, if not entirely, the day’s post will return to being, as are the posts every other day of the week, a catch-all of New Yorker cartoonists doings out there in the world. This does not mean that Ink Spill will lose its critical edge. It simply means I’ll choose my battles instead of battling on a regular basis every monday morning. 

Having said all that, and in the spirit of the Monday Tilley Watch, there is one drawing from the new issue I’d like to mention. Lars Kenseth‘s genie drawing (p.41) is fresh, inventive, well-drawn and yes, funny.  And so, to Mr. Kenseth, a hardy round of applause.

One constant of the Watch will continue weekly: a nod to Rea Irvin’s (sadly) still missing masthead.  Read about it here, and see it below:

 

Who Wrote What In The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons

Scattered through the forthcoming New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons (out October 2nd) are a number of what are called commentaries (an example: “Banana Peels”). These are unsigned, but a blanket credit for assisting in the writing is given in the introduction to cartoonists Emily Flake, Pat Byrnes, Tom Toro, Paul Karasik, and the New Yorker’s Assistant Cartoon Editor, Colin Stokes [full disclosure: I was asked to audition for the opportunity to write a number of these commentaries. I declined to audition after learning my efforts, if used, would appear uncredited].

The Spill loves giving credit where credit is due, and in that spirit I”m listing the work contributed by three of the above unsigned contributors.  Paul Karasik posted some of his contributions on Facebook (I’m attempting to track down the rest). Tom Toro and Pat Byrnes responded to my request for theirs. Should Emily Flake and Colin Stokes respond, I’ll list their contributions as well.

One quibble with these commentaries: they are not indexed; the reader must hunt for them. 

Tom Toro contributed the following:

Automation, Hollywood. Internet, Inventions, Judges, Knitting, Modern Art, Noah’s Ark, Nudism, Real Estate, Valentines

 
Pat Byrnes contributed these:
 
Heaven & Hell, Boxing, Job Interviews, Lawyers, Lighthouses, Meet the Author, Operations, Report Cards, Royalty, Sex, The Thinker
 
Paul Karasik’s contributions:
 
Advertising, Censorship, Evolution, Snowmen, Superheroes, Trojan Horse, Wall Street, Zombies.
 
Emily Flake [list in progress]:
 
Cavemen & -Women…
 
Uncredited as of yet: Banana Peels, Desert Island, Dentistry, Easter Island, Fortune Teller, Famous Painters & Painting, Grim Reaper, Google, King Kong, Life Rafts, Maternity Ward, Owls, Psychiatrists, Pirates, Quicksand,, UFOs, Wise Man On Mountain, X-Rays, Yoga.
 
[Updated: 8:00 pm, Sunday]

The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons: Gender Studies

Above: two pages of the Index from Volume 1 of The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons

In his Foreword to The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick has this to say about gender equality in the ranks of New Yorker cartoonists:

Any cartoon compilation that draws from these archives makes it clear what a male preserve it was. 

And indeed, this encyclopedia reflects that in numbers of cartoons included by women. Of the advertised 3000 cartoons, 142 are by the 19 women represented. Simple math tells us that the remaining 2,858 cartoons are by men.  If you take Roz Chast’s 54 cartoons out of the 142, you’re left with 88 cartoons by 18 women. I emphasize again, as I did in the previous post about the encyclopedia, that this two volume set is not presented as an all-encompassing anthology representing the magazine’s past 93 years; there’s no expectation of some kind of balanced inclusion based on numbers of cartoons the artists contributed.  That isn’t what this encyclopedia is.

And yet, I did find myself hoping for more work by two major female contributors, Helen Hokinson and Barbara Shermund. They have a combined total of 6 cartoons in the encyclopedia. Ms. Shermund’s work appeared in The New Yorker just over 600 times (including 8 covers). I believe, if my numbers are correct she is the third most published female cartoonist in the magazine’s history. She is represented by 1 cartoon in the encyclopedia. Ms. Hokinson is in the top ten of the Spill‘s 23 member K Club (the group of cartoonists who have 1000 or more cartoons published in the New Yorker).  She is in fact, the most published female New Yorker artist in the magazine’s history with 1,796 cartoons and 68 covers. She is represented by 5 cartoons.

The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of September 24-28, 2018; Early Release Of Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; A Mystery Cartoonist; Three Cartoonists in Pennsylvania: Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons; The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons: Gender Studies

An atypical less specifically Trumpian Daily Cartoon week — although he hovers. The contributing cartoonists: Kim Warp, Ellis Rosen, Peter Kuper, and Emily Flake.

Daily Shouts contributing cartoonists: Amy Kurzweil with illustrations by Ellis Rosen, and Ali Fitzgerald.

You can see all the work here.

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Early Release Of Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

As happens from time-to-time, the magazine has early released its next cover. Here’s Ana Juan’s cover for next week’s issue, as well as a short piece about it.

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Mystery Cartoonist

Arnold Zwicky’s Blog, which concerns itself with cartoon language, has posted a cartoon by a mystery cartoonist:

 

If you’re able to identify the artist, please contact Mr. Zwicky through his site.

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Three Cartoonists In Pennsylvania

This Sunday, at the Milford Readers & Writers Festival:

11:30AM:-THREE NEW YORKER CARTOONISTS TALK ABOUT FUNNY:- New Yorker Cartoonists CHRISTOPHER WEYANT and DAVID BORCHART join cartoonist and media commentator BOB ECKSTEIN in a conversation about creating humor. There will be plenty of funny cartoons shown.

Mr. Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

Mr. Borchart began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

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Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

“Max” and “Simon” rate the the cartoons from the issue of October 1st.  P.C. Vey is awarded the CC‘s coveted “Top Toon” blue ribbon.  Read it all here.

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 The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons: Gender Studies

Above: two pages of the Index from Volume 1 of The New Yorker Encyclopedia Of Cartoons

In his Foreword to The New Yorker Encyclopedia of Cartoons, the magazine’s editor, David Remnick has this to say about gender equality in the ranks of New Yorker cartoonists:

Any cartoon compilation that draws from these archives makes it clear what a male preserve it was. 

And indeed, this encyclopedia reflects that in numbers of cartoons included by women. Of the advertised 3000 cartoons, 142 are by the 19 women represented. Simple math tells us that the remaining 2,858 cartoons are by men.  If you take Roz Chast’s 54 cartoons out of the 142, you’re left with 88 cartoons by 18 women. I emphasize again, as I did in the previous post about the encyclopedia, that this two volume set is not presented as an all-encompassing anthology representing the magazine’s past 93 years; there’s no expectation of some kind of balanced inclusion based on numbers of cartoons the artists contributed.  That isn’t what this encyclopedia is.

And yet, I did find myself hoping for more work by two major female contributors, Helen Hokinson and Barbara Shermund. They have a combined total of 6 cartoons in the encyclopedia. Ms. Shermund’s work appeared in The New Yorker just over 600 times (including 8 covers). I believe, if my numbers are correct she is the third most published female cartoonist in the magazine’s history. She is represented by 1 cartoon in the encyclopedia. Ms. Hokinson is in the top ten of the Spill‘s 23 member K Club (the group of cartoonists who have 1000 or more cartoons published in the New Yorker).  She is in fact, the most published female New Yorker artist in the magazine’s history with 1,796 cartoons and 68 covers. She is represented by 5 cartoons.