The Tilley Watch

It’s the first non-Monday Tilley Watch day in quite awhile. Couldn’t pass up mentioning this latest issue’s cover by the great Sempe.  Always a treat seeing his work.

 I’d like to single out a few cartoons in the issue that surprised me (in the best way): Lars Kenseth’s sky editing cartoon (p.66),  David Sipress’s ecosystem drawing (p.28), Sara Lautman’s Michelangelo drawing (p. 58), and  last but certainly not least: Sam Gross’s drawing (p.93).  Mr. Gross is one of the very best cartoonists of our time. Nothing would please me more than seeing one of his cartoons in every single issue.

And here’s to Rea Irvin, and his elegant missing Talk masthead.  Last seen in the New Yorker in the Spring of 2017. Read about that here:

 

Peter Kuper’s Liberpress Award; Fave Photos Of The Day: Eckstein, Weyant and Borchart

Peter Kuper’s Liberpress Award

A hearty Spill congrats to Peter Kuper, who has won a Liberpress Award. 

From their website: LiberPress was created in Girona in 1999. It was set up with the aim of publicising and promoting what could be called the “culture of solidarity”. Its creation was intended to promote a movement based on solidarity and humanitarian values, which would involve the mass media.

Link here and here for more  info.

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Fave Photos Of The Day : Eckstein, Weyant, and Borchart

Bob Eckstein, Christopher Weyant, and David Borchart were on hand at this past weekend’s Milford Readers & Writers Fest.  Here are just a few photos showing the cartoonists up on the stage:

Above: The World’s Leading Authority on Snowmen, Bob Eckstein, with one of his drawings. Below: Mr. Weyant, on the left, and Mr. Borchart on the right.

Christopher Weyant began contributing to The New Yorker in 1998.

David Borchart began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

Bob Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007.

 

A Farewell To The Monday Tilley Watch

I’ve always felt slightly uneasy about the old saying, “The more things change, the more they remain the same.”  But for now it applies to my feelings about the Monday Tilley Watch. It began as an honest response to every new issue’s cartoons. And that was fun (for me)… for awhile. Lately it’s become more of a challenge to say what I want to say without actually saying it (If you can follow that, my hat is off to you). The Monday Tilley Watch  was never meant to be a critical platform, but I’m afraid it’s become one. Biting the hand that feeds me (it’s also a hand I love) gives me no pleasure. And so, beginning today, I’m deconstructing the Monday Tilley Watch. On Mondays I’ll still chime in, from time-to-time, about the latest issue.  But mostly, if not entirely, the day’s post will return to being, as are the posts every other day of the week, a catch-all of New Yorker cartoonists doings out there in the world. This does not mean that Ink Spill will lose its critical edge. It simply means I’ll choose my battles instead of battling on a regular basis every monday morning. 

Having said all that, and in the spirit of the Monday Tilley Watch, there is one drawing from the new issue I’d like to mention. Lars Kenseth‘s genie drawing (p.41) is fresh, inventive, well-drawn and yes, funny.  And so, to Mr. Kenseth, a hardy round of applause.

One constant of the Watch will continue weekly: a nod to Rea Irvin’s (sadly) still missing masthead.  Read about it here, and see it below: