The Newest New Yorker Cartoonists

Tilley Watch...

In what is possibly a record  infusion to its stable of cartoonists, The New Yorker has debuted seven artists in eight issues (two in the latest issue alone). All have been added to Ink Spill‘s  New Yorker Cartoonists A-Z.

The seven and their debut issue:

Kate Curtis… January 25, 2016

Christian Lowe… February 22, 2016

Darrin Bell…March 7, 2016

Brendon Loper…March 28, 2016

Sarah Lautman…March 21, 2016

Seth Fleishman…April 4, 2016

Amy Kurzweil…April 4, 2016

Arno Olio #4: Father William

Arno covers the writer Donald Ogden Stewart’s 1929 “Comedy of Father & Son” Father William.  Although the inner front flap copy reads: “Peter Arno, well known to readers of The New Yorker, adds still further to the gayety of the book by his inimitable illustrations” none of the illustrations within are by Arno. The drawings are actually by Eldon Kelley, one of Arno’s New Yorker colleagues.

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New Yorker Scrapbooks; Last College Humor Arnos From Attempted Bloggery

 

 

NYer Scrapbook 1931

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Back in 1931 The New Yorker published something called The New Yorker Scrapbook; unfortunately it contained zero cartoons, spots, covers, or illustrations. It’s a collection of writing from the then six year old magazine.

 

Over the years I’ve come across (either bought, or received as a gift) a number of scrapbooks containing clipped New Yorker art. In some cases they weren’t technically scrapbooks as the art wasn’t glued or pasted in a book, but stuffed in a manila folder. Those loose drawings are fun to look at,  but you need to dump them out like Pick up Stix before wading through (I won’t show those here). Below are a few more orderly examples from Ink Spill’s archives.

 

The first scrapbooks I ever encountered were in a small used bookstore (The Book Cave?) in Woodstock, New York. Two volumes of New Yorker covers, each a three ring binder such as a student would have in high school.  Someone had (unfortunately) used reinforcement hole protectors on every cover in the earlier binder.  The earliest cover, seen on the left, is dated November 24, 1928 (artist: Julian de Miskey) —  that’s a Helen Hokinson  cover on the right. The last cover in the binder, barely visible in the photo (it’s the pink cover peeking out from the bottom) was the last cover of the 1930s (artist: Charles Addams).

NYer Covers Scrapbook #1

 

 

 

 

 

The second volume, spared the hole reinforcements,  picked up in the 1940s.  Scrapbook #2Shown here: Rea Irvin‘s terrific cover of July 15, 1944 commemorating D-Day.

 

A more recent arrival to the Ink Spill archives (courtesy of a relative) is  dated 1939-1940. The scrapbook contains carefully arranged New Yorker spot drawings.  Though the pages are brittle the cover has  aged well as have the spots:

NYer Spots Scrapbook #1NYer Spots Scrapbook #2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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IMG_0430Attempted Bloggery finishes up its week-long look at some of Peter Arno‘s work for College Humor. Kudos to Stephen Nadler for the great detective work resulting in this fine series.

The American Bystander #2; Arno in College Humor Continued

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The American Bystander #2 is close to publication (a provisional cover by the late great Charles Barsotti appears on the AB site).

For more on The American Bystander  read this (mentions Jack Ziegler, Liza Donnelly, Roz Chast among others).

 

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And over at one of Ink Spill‘s favorite New Yorker cartoonist-related sites,

Attempted Bloggery continues its week-long look at Peter Arno‘s work in College Humor

AB #3

 

Paul Noth & Drew Dernavitch Draw in Princeton; Marisa Acocella Marchetto Pencilled; A John Stanley Tribute; Pt.3 of Attempted Bloggery’s Arnoathon; What’s So Funny About New Yorker Cartoons, Computers & Understanding?

Paul & DrewPaul Noth and Drew Dernavitch will be drawing at Princeton on April 21st.  All the details here.  [photo: Paul Noth on the left, Mr. Dernavitch on the right]

Paul Noth’s website.

Drew Dernavitch’s website.

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Jane Mattimoe’s blog,  A Case For Pencils  continues with its impressive series of New Yorker cartoonists talking about their tools of the trade.  This week it’s Marisa Acocella Marchetto.

Ms. Marchetto’s website (and her latest book below)

 

 

 

Ann Tenna

 

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John Stanley photo

One Club icon

From Comics Alliance, “Putting the ‘Comic’ in ‘Comic Book’: A Tribute to John Stanley” by Benito Ceren.  Mr. Stanley is a member of  Ink Spill‘s “One Club” (One Club membership is limited to cartoonists who had but one drawing in The New Yorker during their career). Mr. Stanley’s cartoon  — an eight panel captionless drawing — appeared in The New Yorker March 15, 1947.

Stanley bibliography

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Stanley in the 1940s: A Comics Bibliography by Frank M. Young

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Arno, CHumor pt. 3Attempted Bloggery continues its look at Peter Arno‘s work in College Humor.  Today’s post: the July 1937 issue.

 

 

 

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David laughing

From CNET.com,March 23, 2016,   “How New Yorker Cartoons Could Teach Computers to Be Funny”

[screen grab of The New Yorker‘s Editor, David Remnick laughing at a cartoon]