Personal History: Holding

I happened upon a paper-clipped bunch of pages today in the Spill‘s archives that I’d completely forgotten about. The very first page, from late 1980, appears above.  It comes as news to me thirty-nine years later that I made a list of drawings that were being held by The New Yorker

This is what holding means:

When a cartoonist submitted a batch of drawings, and returned the following week to submit another batch, last week’s rejects would be waiting. Along with the returned drawings was the classic New Yorker rejection slip — and occasionally there would be, on the slip, a handwritten Holding 1 (sometimes more than one drawing was held). For whatever reason, or reasons, Lee Lorenz, the art editor at the time, had decided to hang onto a drawing for further consideration.  Held drawings were in limbo — not bought,  just held. And then they were either returned, or bought.  

Having a drawing held was always preferable to complete rejection: it was a glimmer of hope that maybe, just maybe, that held drawing would be “OKed” (i.e., bought).  What’s interesting (to me) about the list was how many held drawings there were in that short period of time. Without this list as a reminder I would’ve guessed that one of my drawings was held every two or three months, at most.  Six held within a couple of months, and two bought seems like much better odds than memory allowed. The Calm Before The Coffee was Oked but I didn’t bother underlining it in red and placing an asterisk next to it — I must’ve forgotten I had started a holding list by the time it was OKed. 

 

Guilty Pleasures: 75 New Yorker Cartoons Reprinted; Today’s Daily New Yorker Cartoonist: Tim Hamilton; Reminder: Roz Chast At The Strand Tonight; New York Times Op-Ed On The American Bystander; Gahan Wilson GoFundMe Campaign Over A Third Of The Way To Goal

Somehow this December 2018 release escaped notice here. What’s of particular interest are the number of reprinted New Yorker cartoons it contains: 75 of them. I can’t remember a nonNew Yorker book that has ever come close to reprinting this many (if anyone does, please let me know).

PR from the publisher, The Oxford University Press:

In Guilty Pleasures, legal scholar Laura Little provides a multi-faceted account of American law and humor, looking at constraints on humor (and humor’s effect on law), humor about law, and humor in law.

To give you an idea of how massive this usage is, here are the drawings (with each cartoon’s artist and assigned Cartoon Bank number):

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Today’s Trumptoon

Tim Hamilton does the honors today — see it here. Mr. Hamilton began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

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Reminder: Roz Chast At The Strand Tonight at 7:00

All the info here!

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New York Times Op-Ed On The American Bystander

A fun NYTs Op-Ed on The American Bystander, past and present  (mentions George Booth, Sam Gross, and Ms. Chast)

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Gahan Wilson GoFundMe Campaign Over A Third Of Its Way To Goal

One of the great contemporary New Yorker cartoonists is suffering from severe dementia. A GoFundMe campaign is underway to help Mr. Wilson. Read about it here and to donate.

 

Fave Photo(s) Of The Day: Drew Friedman And Robert Crumb

Here are a couple of fun photos, taken in NYC yesterday: On the left is Drew Friedman, and on the right is Robert Crumb.  What brought them together is the book Mr. Crumb is holding, The Book Of Weirdo, an anthology of Weirdo magazine (created by Mr. Crumb in 1981, it was published until 1993).

The anthology is coming this Spring from Last Gasp. Mr. Friedman did the cover and wrote the intro; the anthology itself is edited by Jon B. Cooke.  More photos here.

Both Mr. Friedman and Mr. Crumb began contributing their work to The New Yorker in 1994.

(photos courtesy of Mr. Friedman)

 

James Stevenson Theater Prize Returns; Maira Kalman’s Work at Armory; I’m Emily Flake; Thurber’s Airedale, Muggs; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Ivan Ehlers

From Playing On Air, March 1, 2019, The Second Annual James Stevenson Prize For Comedic Short Plays. All the info here.

Mr. Stevenson’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other NYer artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! ( MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential.

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Suite of Maira Kalman’s Work at Park Avenue Art Show

From artnet, March 1, 2019, Six Dazzling Works at the ADAA’s Art Show, From Maira Kalman’s Gertrude Stein Portraits to Art Made Out of Saran Wrap” 

Ms. Kalman began contributing to The New Yorker in 1995. Link here to her website.

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I’m Emily Flake

From Offspring, February 25, 2019, “I’m New Yorker Cartoonist Emily Flake, And This Is How I Parent”

Ms. Flake began contributing to The New Yorker in 2008.  Link here to her website.

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Thurber’s Airedale

I may have posted this piece on Thurber’s airedale, Muggs once before a long while back,  but I can’t resist posting again.  Here’s the piece.

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon is by Ivan Ehlers (the subject is… ta-da! Trump).