Video Of Interest: Amy Hwang’s TedX Yale Talk; Interview Of Interest: Caitlin Cass; John Donohue’s All The Restaurants In New York Launch; Book Event Of Interest With Bob Eckstein, Roz Chast, Robert Leighton, and Bruce Eric Kaplan; Article Of Interest: Seth; Today’s Daily Cartoonist: Tim Hamilton

Video Of Interest: Amy Hwang’s TedX Yale Talk

 

Watch Amy Hwang’s recent TedX Yale talk, “How To Make A Decision That Could Ruin Your Life”

Ms. Hwang began contributing to The New Yorker in 2010.  Visit her website here.

Left : an Amy Hwang New Yorker drawing from January 30, 2017.

 

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Interview Of Interest: Caitlin Cass

From The Beat,May 9, 2019, “The TCAF 209 Interviews: Caitlin Cass On The Great Moments Of Western Civilization & The Suffrage Movement” 

Ms. Cass began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. Visit her website here.

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John Donohue’s Book Event

A reminder: John Donohue will celebrate the publication of All The Restaurants In New York on May 16th at the Powerhouse arena. All the info here.

Mr. Donohue began contributing cartoons to The New Yorker in 2004. He is also a former editor of  The New Yorker’s Goings On About Town section. 

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Book Event Of Interest: Eckstein, Kaplan, Leighton, and Chast

Bob Eckstein, who edited the recent anthology, The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons has posted the below notice:

Link here to The Grolier Club website.

Mr. Eckstein began contributing to The New Yorker in 2007; Ms. Chast in 1978; Mr. Leighton in 2002; Mr. Kaplan in 1991.

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Article Of Interest

An interesting article on Seth (Gregory Gallant) from The Welland Tribune. Seth began contributing covers to The New Yorker in 2002.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist/Cartoon

Trump the spoiler courtesy of  Tim Hamilton (above) who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

 

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings; The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019; Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

Exhibit Of Interest: Peter Steiner’s Recent Paintings

Peter Steiner, a person who wears many hats (cartoonist, novelist, teacher, painter) will show recent paintings at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon in June.  All the info here (including an expanded bio). 

Mr. Steiner began contributing his cartoons to The New Yorker in 1979. His 1993 drawing“On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is one of the magazine’s most reprinted cartoons in its history. 

Mr. Steiner’s next book, The Good Cop, will be out this November.

Visit his website here.

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The Tilley Watch Online, April 29 – May 4, 2019

A weekly round-up of work by New Yorker cartoonists appearing on newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoon and Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Avi Steinberg, John Cuneo, Lila Ash, David Sipress, and Adam Douglas Thompson.

Daily Shouts: Ellie Black, Jeremy Nguyen (with Irving Ruan), Caitlin Cass, Ali Fitzgerald, and Roz Chast.

To see all the above, and more, link here.

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Seth Fleishman’s Tribute To Nurit Karlin

The cartoonist Seth Fleishman, is, along with John O’Brien, one of The New Yorker‘s few steady practitioners of the captionless cartoon (a far more difficult form, I’ve always believed, than the captioned cartoon).  Mr. Fleishman and Mr. O’Brien have done wonders with captionless cartoons in recent times.  

When Mr. Fleishman learned of the passing of Nurit Karlin, an earlier master whose entire New Yorker run of cartoons was, by far, captionless, he sent along this photo of himself,  sans text.

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of August 27th, 2018

  Kadir Nelson‘s cover (a tribute to Aretha Franklin) was posted last week.  Not mentioned here at the time (but noted on the New Yorker‘s Table of Contents): the image was inspired by Charles W. White’s Folksinger. 

The new issue’s “Fall Preview” accounts for the abundance of arts ads and illustrations. 

The cartoons:

Now we’re talkin’: sixteen cartoons in this issue vs last week’s nine.  A number of the sixteen cartoons stand out for various reasons. Two of them (I won’t single them out) are beyond me. Not long ago I would’ve emailed Jack Ziegler to explain them to me. It was always comforting when Jack didn’t understand a drawing either. Often he’d respond with a variation of, “I don’t know what the hell it means.”

 Now for some others that stood out (these I understand): Seth Fleishman‘s mirror ball drawing cements his reputation as the New Yorker‘s mirror ball guy. Funny drawing. Also very funny: Joe Dator‘s “hunny” sniffing Pooh airport scenario. And then there’s David Borchart‘s sea-faring koala drawing. Oh my my my. I mentioned Jack Ziegler before. I think Jack would’ve loved these drawings — they’re wonderfully in his ballpark of way-out-there. A Spill round of applause.

A thought here about the placement of every cartoon in the issue: none seemed pressed for space, in need of breathing room. Victoria Roberts doctor’s office drawing (p.69) and Ellis Rosen‘s (p.42) are good examples. The reader can really enjoy the fine drawing going on in these pieces (and in others).

This issue includes the debut New Yorker cartoon by Caitlin Cass. Ms. Cass is the seventeenth new cartoonist brought in since cartoon editor, Emma Allen was appointed in the Spring of 2017. Ms. Cass’s style — mostly the way she handles faces — reminds me of a New Yorker cover artist from the Golden Age: Christina Malman.  Oddly enough, while looking through Ms. Malman’s twenty-four covers for the magazine I came across one (shown below) thematically linked to Ms. Cass’s drawing of children looking at art in a museum.

A final thought before Rea Irvin’s classic missing masthead shows up at the end of this post: I’m wondering if Emma Hunsinger‘s funny caption for her drawing on page 77 would’ve also worked if the word “aren’t” was “are”…and if that’s so — if it’s so how often it happens in cartoon captions that a word completely flipped can still work with the drawing. In this case, substituting “are” for “aren’t” would radically change the intent. Ms. Hunsinger’s use of the word “aren’t” suggests the parents are concerned their child’s behavior is unusual. By using “are” the parents would instead be hopeful that their child’s behavior might make for a viral video.

For the record, here is the list of cartoonists in this issue:

And now, as promised, the missing Irvin masthead.

 — See you next week