The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of April 6, 2020; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

The Cover: A heart-strings reflection of the issue’s Health Issue theme (but it’s tempting to believe we’d see a cover along these lines even if it wasn’t the Health Issue).

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

An umbrella observation from the get-go:  the abundance of color pieces (one by Roz Chast, one by Emily Flake, and one by Liana Finck) in this issue at times kind’ve almost sorta made it feel as if I was paging through a Cartoon Issue. However, unlike the special pieces found in Cartoon Issues of yore, all three of these new pieces are distinctly linked to one subject (can you guess what it might be?).

There are a number of cartoons in this issue that got my attention, beginning with Barbara Smaller’s (p.26) — my favorite Smaller drawing thus far this year. Also eye-catching: Justin Sheen’s castle & moat drawing; Brendan Loper’s getting away from it all cartoon, and Ed Steed’s survivor. All four enjoy a sharply written caption.

A number of drawings (beyond the color pieces mentioned above)  are either directly related to, or can be seen as related to the coronavirus, foremost being Joe Dator’s terrif drawing (p.69), P.C. Vey’s (p.31), and Mr. Loper’s cartoon on page 39. Tom Chitty’s friendly city drawing (p.57), as well as John O’Brien’s drawing (on page 72) could possibly be read as corona-related cartoons. The folks in Mr. O’Brien’s supermarket all seem to be spaced at least six feet apart, but, as with most all of Mr. O’Brien’s drawings, it’s an evergreen.

The remaining four drawings: Sofia Warren’s, Amy Hwang’s, Teresa Burns Parkhurst’s, and an effort from the Bliss/Martin duo, are comic relief unrelated to the health crisis.

Paperwork: the aforementioned Justin Sheen is new to the New Yorker cartoonist fold. He’s the 4th new cartoonist of 2020, and the 57th new cartoonist brought into The New Yorker since Emma Allen was appointed cartoon editor in the Spring of 2017.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:

Read about Rea Irvin’s mothballed iconic Talk masthead (above) here.

And This:

Just noticed that The New Yorker‘s Facebook New Yorker Cartoons page received a make-over. The new look is shown below — new (old) typography, and a (recycled) Rea Irvin inspired banana peel-inspecting Tilley icon replacing Christoph Niemann’s guy at a table icon. Mr. Niemann’s icon showed up in the Spring of 2017, and replaced an existing icon — a drawing by Jack Ziegler.  It puzzled me at the time (and thereafter) that work by a non-New Yorker cartoonist (Mr. Niemann) was chosen to replace an icon drawn by an iconic New Yorker cartoonist.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Kendra Allenby on the newest normal.

Ms. Allenby began contributing to The New Yorker in 2016. Visit her website here.

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Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

Avi Steinberg gives us “Things That Used To Be Annoying But Are Now A Comfort” — Mr. Steinberg began contributing to The New Yorker in 2012.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Chast & Marx In Connecticut; The Tilley Watch Online for the Week of February 24th-28th, 2020

Chast & Marx In Connecticut

Roz Chast & Patricia Marx will be at the Ridgefield Public Library on March 13th, promoting their most recent book,You Can Only Yell At Me For One Thing At A Time.

It’s probably safe to assume there’ll be some ukulele playing at this ticketed event (five bucks).

Ms. Chast began contributing to The New Yorker in 1978. Visit her website here.

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An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features

The Daily Cartoon: Drew Dernavich, Jon Adams, Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Brendan Loper, Avi Steinberg, Peter Kuper.

 

Daily Shouts: Olivia de Recat, Liana Finck .

…and: Barry Blitt’s weekly Kvetchbook

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All New Yorker Cartoons Are New Yorker Drawings But Not All New Yorker Drawings Are New Yorker Cartoons; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

In a fun February 22nd 2020 post on The Daily Cartoonist celebrating the first appearance of James Thurber’s drawings in The New Yorker (shown above), the post’s author D.D. Degg wrote this:

There seems to be some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons. A New Yorker State of Mind, where the above screenshot comes from, calls them cartoons; whereas others disagree, calling them spot art. Cartoonist and New Yorker cartoon historian Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue (below).

To use language we’ve been hearing a lot of in Democratic debates: my name was invoked, so I would like to respond.

There really shouldn’t be “some disagreement over whether the above drawings constitute cartoons.”  Using the New Yorker‘s language for referring to cartoons, in usage for 95 years, there are two ways one can go when referring to the magazine’s cartoons: you can call them cartoons, or you can call them drawings (and well yes, there’s a third descriptive:  some call them “art”). The magazine “officially” refers to them as drawings (you can see the designation on every Table Of Contents). There are three kinds of New Yorker cartoon formats: with a title (and that could mean a series of cartoons linked by a theme — all appearing in a spread. Booth, Ziegler, Levin, and Saxon, to name a few, were responsible for some terrific spreads over the years); with a caption; without a caption. I’ll show you three of mine as examples:

With a caption:

Without a caption:

With a title:

All of the above are cartoons, and they are also drawings. They all appeared in the magazine, surrounded in some part by text, but not linked to the text in any way other than graphic proximity. In Thurber’s Pet Department piece at the top of this post, the drawings are accompanying the text — the piece as a whole set off by a horizontal and vertical line. The seal, and the dog exist in Thurber’s piece to illustrate the text surrounding them. New Yorker cartoons, historically, do not reflect, or refer to, or illustrate the text surrounding them.  In Thurber’s Pet Department drawings there is no “one-two punch” with either drawing (according to Peter Arno, that one-two punch is an essential element of a New Yorker cartoon). The wonderful Thurber dog and seal, if removed from the accompanying text, and left on their own, would still be fun drawings (hey, they’re Thurber drawings after all). They might make us laugh; we may find it amusing that a seal is in a room with a table and lamp (I know I do). But if the drawings had been submitted as cartoons, sans accompanying text, I doubt the editors would’ve bought and run them as a stand alone drawing/cartoons (Spots maybe). There’s not enough cartoon there.

Another sliver from Mr. Degg’s post, referring specifically to Thurber’s dog and seal:

“…whereas others disagree, calling them spot art.”

New Yorker spot drawings are free range graphic pieces, not illustrating the text surrounding them (in modern times they sometimes do refer to an issue’s theme, if the issue is thematic), thus Thurber’s dog and seal are not New Yorker spot drawings.

Finally, Mr. Degg’s says:

“…Michael Maslin claims the first real Thurber cartoon appeared in the January 3, 1931 issue…”

My information concerning Thurber’s first New Yorker cartoon comes from Edwin T. Bowden’s James Thurber: A Bibliography, published by Ohio State University Press in 1968. In all the years (close to 40 now) I’ve used this as a reference, I’ve yet to find an error.  While I heavily rely on Mr. Bowden’s good work, I also comb through back issues of The New Yorker.  In all of my combing, I’ve never found an earlier Thurber New Yorker cartoon than the one Mr. Bowden designated as the first ( that cartoon appeared in the issue of January 31, 1931).

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Brendan Loper on getting directions.

Mr. Loper has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily: Avi Steinberg on a warm February.

Mr. Steinberg has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2012.

 

Weekend Spill: “I Played Ping-Pong” With Thurber…The New Yorker’s Roger Angell Interview; John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin; The Tilley Watch Online: February 10-14, 2020

Interview Of Interest: Roger Angell

From The New Yorker, this terrif interview of Roger Angell by Willing Davidson, a senior editor at the magazine: “Baseball, Fiction, And Life: Roger Angell’s Era-spanning Career At The New Yorker”

Left: Mr. Angell, wearing the hat, with another New Yorker era-spanner, Edward Koren

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John Cuneo Sketches A Cover On A Napkin

When I meet up with cartoonists here in the Hudson Valley it’s a rare thing for any drawing to be done. Most of the time — 99.999% of the time — is spent jabbering about all kinds of things. But — there’s always a but, right? — yesterday while sitting in a bakery/coffee joint with New Yorker colleagues, Danny Shanahan and John Cuneo, John began to describe a cover he’s working on for Michael Gerber’s fab American Bystander. As the fine tip Uniball pen often cuts to the chase quicker than the spoken word, John grabbed a napkin and within seconds ( a minute at most) drew the above. Hoarder that I am, I asked him if I could have it just as he was about to crumple it up, and then asked if he would sign it. Luckily, he was  agreeable-enough to both requests. I’ll run his sketch again side-by-side the finished piece once it appears on The American Bystander.

—My thanks to John Cuneo for sharing his napkin with the Spill. 

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The Tilley Watch Online

An end of week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features,  February 10-14, 2020.

The Daily Cartoon: Amy Hwang, Ivan Ehlers, Kim Warp, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash.

Daily Shouts:  Olivia de Recat (with Julia Edelman), J.A.K. (with Harris Mayersohn),

…And:

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

“Dinner Party” — A video with Marc Philippe Eskenazi, who was at one time an assistant in the cartoon department.

 

 

Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”; Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s); New York Times Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

Film Of Interest: Wes Anderson’s New Yorker-ish “The French Dispatch”

From The New Yorker‘s Culture Desk, February 11, 2020,  “A Look At Wes Anderson’s New, New Yorker-Inspired Film” this should be fun.

Above: the poster, which resembles a certain magazine’s cover. Read more here.

Above: Bill Murray as the magazine’s editor, Arthur Howitzer, Jr. — a character “inspired by Harold Ross, The New Yorker‘s founding editor…[with] a dash of A.J. Liebling.”

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Video Of Interest: Liza Donnelly On Oscar’s Red Carpet

From Fab TV, this YouTube video of Liza Donnelly on Oscar’s Red Carpet this past Sunday.

Ms. Donnelly, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1982, has posted all of her Red Carpet drawings on Medium.

For more info visit Liza Donnelly’s website here.

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Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon (And Yesterday’s)

Brendan Loper on the field of Democratic Presidential candidates.

Mr. Loper began contributing to in 2016.

Yesterday’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon:

Lila Ash on too many caucuses. Ms. Ash began contributing to The New Yorker in 2018. See more of her work here.

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New York Times Magazine Piece Of Interest: Tina Brown

From The New York Times Magazine, “Tina Brown on the future of the royal family” — Don’t be fooled by the title, this piece by Dave Marchese, includes a good bit of New Yorker talk.

Left: Edward Sorel‘s cover for Ms. Brown’s first issue of The New Yorker (October 5, 1992).