The Weekend Spill: Chuck Jones’s Eustace; The Cartoon Takeover Issue; The Tilley Watch Online, December 22-28, 2019

Here’s something new to me: the great Chuck Jones  take-off on Eustace Tilley. The poster can be found here.

___________________________________________________________________________

The Cartoon Takeover

It was an exciting week in The New Yorker cartoon world, what with the arrival of the magazine’s first ever Cartoon Takeover issue (covered here last Monday). For everyone who says that the first thing they turn to in the magazine is the cartoons, you had a lot to turn to.

Read about the issue in this piece, “The Cartoon Department Coup” by Emma Allen, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor.

Fingers crossed this special issue becomes a yearly thing, leading up to the magazine’s super-duper anniversary in 2025.

______________________________________________________________________________

The Tilley Watch Online: An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com features.

Artists contributing to newyorker.com are of two stripes: some contribute solely to the online magazine, and others cross-over from print to online. For now, only the artists appearing in print are listed on the Spill‘s A-Z. Artists solely appearing online are italicized below.

The Daily Cartoon: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Paul Karasik, David Ostow, Felipe Galindo, Benjamin Slyngstad.

Daily Shouts: J.A.K., Olivia de Recat, Ali Fitzgerald.

And…

From Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook: “The Latest On J.D. Salinger Unearthed”

“The New Yorker Cartoons For The Holidays” — by Colin Stokes, the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor.

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist; Barry Blitt’s Latest Kvetchbook: J.D. Salinger; “New Yorker Cartoons For The Holidays”

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Teresa Burns Parkhurst on ice skating. Ms. Parkhurst began contributing to The New Yorker in 2017.

More of her New Yorker work can be seen here.

___________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Shouts Cartoonist

“Classic Instagram Poses To Confuse People About Whether You’re Dating Someone”

— a joint effort by Jason Adam Katzenstein, who wrote the piece & Jenny Kroik, who illustrated it.

Mr. Katzenstein has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2014.  Ms. Kroik since 2017.

________________________________________________________

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

Mr. Blitt on a J.D. Salinger moment. See it here.

Barry Blitt has been contributing to The New Yorker since 1994.

…Salinger as a subject proved irresistible to me as well. Here’s what I did with him in a piece titled  “If Salinger Tweeted”  published in the Spring 2014 Southampton Review.


New Yorker Cartoons For The Holidays

A healthy number of holiday themed cartoons from the archives (including the above beauty from William Steig, published December 31, 1955) selected by the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes. See them here.

 

The Weekend Spill: A Whither Now? MAD Dartboard; The Online Tilley Watch: December 16 -20, 2019; From The Archives: 1984 “The New Yorker” Cartoonists Traveling Exhibit Poster

A Whither Now? MAD Dartboard

MAD was in the news not long ago when it announced it was no longer going to turn out a brand new content-filled magazine, but rely instead on reprinting older material.  Now the folks at MAD have (sort of) given its readers a game of choice. The below graphic piece appears in the February 2020 issue, along with the news that famed artist Al Jaffee will no longer do the fold-in back page after a gazillion years of doing so.

The Online Tilley Watch, December 16-20, 2019

An end of the week list of New Yorker artists* who contributed to newyorker.com features.

* artists contributing to newyorker.com are of two stripes: some contribute solely to the online magazine, and others cross-over from print to online.  For now, only the artists appearing in print are listed on the Spill‘s A-Z.

 

 

The Daily Cartoon: Ellis Rosen, Brooke Bourgeois, Ali Solomon, Avi Steinberg, Ellie Black.

Daily Shouts: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell, Ali Solomon.

and…

Instagram’s Favorite New Yorker Cartoons Of 2019…by The New Yorker‘s assistant cartoon editor, Colin Stokes.

Not-To-Be-Missed Shouts Of 2019…by The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen.

Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

All of the above, and more, can be seen here.

_________________________________________________

From The Archives: 1984 “The New Yorker” Cartoonists Traveling Exhibit Poster

I may, or may not, have posted this once before — if so, it was quite awhile ago. It’s a great at-a-glance look at The New Yorker‘s cartoon stable, mid 1980s (with a few departed stable mates work included:  Peter Arno, and R.Taylor, among them).

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of December 23, 2019; Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon; Emma Allen’s Year In Review Not-To-Be-Missed Daily Shouts; Blitt’s Mao & Nixon

The Cover:  Ed Steed’s third New Yorker cover in five months. This makes my day: it’s always great to see a New Yorker cartoonist cross-over from the cartoon department to the art department (shades of the pre-Tina Brown days when the cartoonists provided the majority of covers). Here’s a Q&A with Mr. Steed about his latest cover.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Zipping through this new issue I see it’s loaded with cartoons (yay!).  I also see that the freshman class of the 1970s is well represented: Roz Chast, Mick Stevens, the late Jack Ziegler, and myself; there are also four freshman from the class of the 1990s: P.C. Vey, Nick Downes, Kim Warp, and Barbara Smaller. And at opposite ends of the time line are George Booth, a freshman in the class of the 1960s (1969 to be a little more precise), and Keith Knight, who makes his New Yorker debut in this issue (so a freshman in the class of the 2010s). Mr. Knight is the 27th newbie of the year, and the 53rd to join The New Yorker‘s stable since Emma Allen took the cartoon department reins in the Spring of 2017.

Seeing the Booth cartoon (it’s on p.32) takes me right back to my fledgling days at The New Yorker and my belief that Mr. Booth’s work is what the magazine’s cartoons are all about: superb drawing, and a precisely defined world of personalized humor. Some forty plus years after I discovered Mr. Booth’s world I still get revved up and inspired from seeing one of his drawings.

A couple of thoughts on a couple of drawings: both Sofia Warren’s fine drawing (p.51) and Nick Downes’ wonderful Rockefeller Center skating rink drawing would’ve benefited us (the readers) had they been allowed more space. These are drawings full of great detail.

On the other hand, Roz Chast’s funny Abominable Snow-Woman (p.73) seems just the right size. Such a good drawing. It would be great if she marketed her snow-woman as a stuffed toy (I’d want one).

Really enjoyed Paul Noth’s Bat-signal/Robin-signal drawing (p.42).  I especially like the work he put into Batman and Robin’s outfits.

Speaking of cartoon worlds, as I was earlier in regards to Mr. Booth’s work, I cannot leave this ramble on the cartoons without mentioning how missed Jack Ziegler’s cartoon world is. Seeing his drawing in this issue is a tip of the iceberg reminder of what a spectacularly funny cartoonist he was. If you don’t already have his masterpiece collection, Hamburger Madness, get it.

 

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Bah, humbug…nothing has changed.  The redrawn masthead, installed in the Spring of 2017 still sits where Mr. Irvin’s beauty once sat. Below is Mr. Irvin’s classic design; here’s where you can read more about it.

_________________________________________________________

Today’s Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Ellie Black on a critic’s crisis.

Ms. Black has been contributing to The New Yorker since February of this year.

 

________________________________________________________

Shouts In Review

Emma Allen, The New Yorker’s cartoon editor, and editor of  Daily Shouts, lists Shouts highlights.

A whole bunch of New Yorker cartoonists are therein.

 

 

_____________________________________________________

Blitt’s Mao & Nixon

From “Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook,” a flashback to February of 1972, when Nixon met Mao. Above: the real deal.

 

 

 

The Weekend Spill: Happy 125th James Thurber!; Three New Yorkers; New Cast Album For Arno’s 1930’s Musical “The New Yorkers”; The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of December 2-6, 2019

Happy 125th James Thurber!

Anyone who follows the Spill knows that James Thurber is a mighty big deal around here. I’ve written numerous times over the years how seeing his drawing, “What have you done with Dr. Millmoss?” changed everything for me. Today marks the 125th anniversary of Thurber’s birth.  Michael Rosen’s recently published A Mile and a Half of Lines: The Art of James Thurber is an excellent book to throw yourself into today, or any day.

________________________________________________________________________

Three New Yorkers

The three issues above unexpectedly arrived in the mail the other day, courtesy of a friend.  I immediately shoved my stack of drawing paper to the side and dove into the magazines. When I look through older copies of The New Yorker I focus on the art (so many cartoons to see, so little time).

So, what do these three issues have in common besides being three issues of The New Yorker and all published in the early 60s? Each has at least one drawing by Frank Modell, James Stevenson, and Dana Fradon. That trio, in their time, along with perhaps ten other cartoonists, anchored hundreds, if not thousands of issues of The New Yorker.

When I arrived at The New Yorker in the late 1970s, Messrs. Modell, Fradon, and Stevenson had already been contributing for decades, with Frank Modell the most veteran of the bunch, having begun at The New Yorker during the mid-1940s.  As I was beginning my New Yorker education by studying back issues of the magazine I was astounded to discover how long these artists had already been at the magazine. Even more astounding: there were cartoonists who’d been at The New Yorker even longer, and were still contributing — such greats as Al Ross, who began contributing in 1937, Whitney Darrow, Jr. (1933), George Price (1929), and William Steig (1930).

I was lucky enough to meet and get to know (if only a little) most of the cartoonists mentioned above. Of the three exceptions: Steig, Darrow, and Price, I communicated via a few letters with Steig — Whitney Darrow turned an idea of mine into a New Yorker drawing. I regret not walking over and meeting Whitney Darrow, and George Price at the only once-in-a-lifetime  opportunities I had with each. I’ve written before of the magazine’s artists family tree — the generations overlapping at the magazine. Just a few weeks ago I met several New Yorker cartoonists who’ve just started their careers in the past couple of years — one in just the past six months. Picking up almost any issue of the magazine, from the earliest years to the most recent is an instant reminder of the connectivity.

From the Spill‘s A-Z, the Modell, Fradon, and Stevenson entries:

Frank Modell ( photograph taken early 1990s) Born, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1917. Died, May 27, 2016, Guilford, Connecticut. New Yorker work: 1946 – 1997. Mr. Modell began his New Yorker career as assistant to the Art Editor, James Geraghty. He soon began contributing his cartoons (and cartoon ideas for others), with his first drawing appearing July 20, 1946. Besides his work for The New Yorker, he was a children’s book author and an actor (he appeared, most notably, in Woody Allen’s 1980 film, Stardust Memories). Key collection: Stop Trying To Cheer Me Up! (Dodd, Mead, 1978).

Dana Fradon (photo: 1978). Born, Chicago, Illinois, 1922. Died, October 3, 2019, Woodstock, NY.  Studied at the Art Institute of Chicago prior to service in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Following his service, he attended the Art Students League of New York, New Yorker work: May 1, 1948 – April 21, 2003. Collection: Insincerely Yours (Scribners, 1978) To read Ink Spill’s 2013 interview with Mr. Fradon, “Harold Ross’s Last Cartoonist” link here.

 

James Stevenson Born, NYC, 1929. Died, February 17, 2017, Cos Cob, Connecticut. New Yorker work: March 10, 1956 -. Stevenson interned as an office boy at The New Yorker in the mid 1940s when he began supplying ideas for other NYer artists. Nine years later he was hired a full-time ideaman, given an office at the magazine and instructed not to tell anyone what he did. He eventually began publishing his own cartoons and covers as well as a ground-breaking Talk of the Town pieces (ground breaking in that the pieces were illustrated). His contributions to the magazine number over 2000. Key collections: Sorry Lady — This Beach is Private! (MacMillan, 1963), Let’s Boogie ( Dodd, Mead, 1978). Stevenson has long been a children’s book author, with roughly one hundred titles to his credit. He is a frequent contributor to the Op-Ed page of The New York Times, under the heading Lost and Found New York. Stevenson’s recent book, published in 2013, The Life, Loves and Laughs of Frank Modell, is essential. “Stevenson Lost and Found,” a documentary film by Sally Williams, was released in 2019.

— The cover artists for The New Yorkers  shown at the top of this post: l-r: Robert Kraus, Garrett Price, and Arthur Getz

__________________________________________________________

New Cast Album For Cole Porter’s (and Peter Arno’s) 1930 Musical, The New Yorkers

From Broadway World, December 6th, 2019, “The New Cast Album of ‘The New Yorkers,’ the 1930 Cole Porter Musical, is Available today”

If you want to read a lot more about “The New Yorkers” I modestly suggest my Arno biography, specifically Chapter Seven:  Up Broadway and Down.

Above left: The cover of the new cast recording. To the right “The New Yorkers” original 1930 program, with art by Peter Arno.

____________________________________________________

The Tilley Watch Online, The Week Of December 2-6, 2019

An end of the week listing of New Yorker artists who’ve contributed to newyorker.com

The Daily Cartoon: David Ostow, Tom Toro, Paul Karasik, Ali Solomon, Jon Adams.

Daily Shouts: Julia Wertz, Olivia de Recat.

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook.

To see all of the above, and much more, link here.