The Tilley Watch Online, Newyorker.com’s Daily Cartoons, February 4-8, 2019; Post-Auction Hokinsons On Attempted Bloggery; A Charles Saxon Shout-Out

This week’s Daily cartoons — close to 100% Trumpian — were contributed by Jason Adam Katzenstein, Michael Shaw, Peter Kuper, Barry Blitt, and Christopher Weyant.

New Yorker cartoonists contributing to Daily Shouts: Ed Steed, Tim Hamilton, Roz Chast, and Emily Flake.

See all of the above and more here on newyorker.com

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Post-Auction Hokinsons on Attempted Bloggery

Published January 1944 in The New Yorker

Attempted Bloggery has been taking a look at a small crop of Helen Hokinson drawings recently up-for-auction. You should take a look too!

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A Charles Saxon Shout-Out

A Charles Saxon cartoon anthology from 1977

It’s always a treat to see one cartoonist say nice things about another. Here’s Bill Abbott on Facebook talking about the late very great Charles Saxon.*

* Mr. Abbott suggests in his shout out that Saxon “never actually wrote any of his own material” — I believe he’s thinking of George Price, who is the only New Yorker cartoonist, other than Helen Hokinson, who relied solely on provided ideas.

And here’s Charles Saxon’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Charles Saxon Born in Brooklyn, Nov 13, 1920, died in Stamford, Conn., Dec 6, 1988. NYer work: 1943 – 1991 (2 drawings published posthumously). Key collection: One Man’s Fancy ( Dodd, Mead, 1977).

Bonus! Here’s a link to a fun Saxon photo I’d not seen until this morning.


The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker (Double) Issue Of December 24 & 31, 2018

The Cover: The last issue of the year is also the “Power Issue” (the fellows depicted on the cover certainly reflect various measures of power).  Read what the cover artist Barry Blitt had to say about his Sherlocklike cover.

The Cartoonists in the issue:

As it’s the end of the year, I’ll dispense with counting the number of illustrations.  Let’s just say the ratio of illustrations to cartoons remains the same as it’s been in recent times.

Two cartoon items of note:

  1.  Couldn’t help but think of the famous Saturday Night Live Christopher Walken More Cowbell skit when I came to Charlie Hankin’s very funny drawing, “I’m gonna need even less tuba.”  A nod to Mr. Walken’s hilarious classic perhaps?
  2. I believe that this is the New Yorker print debut for cartoonist Christine Mi. If true, she is the 12th new cartoonist to appear this year and the 24th since Emma Allen became cartoon editor in May of 2017.

As we head off to the flickering bright lights of 2019, let us not forget Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead.  It disappeared in the Spring of 2017. Read about it here.

 

 

 

 

 

Edward Koren Book Events; An Early Release Of Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Colin Tom Is Pencilled; Live New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers; Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

From UV Index, November 8, 2018, “Ed Koren, the ‘New Yorker’ cartoonist who served as Vermont’s cartoon laureate, releases new book” — this press release mentioning two upcoming events featuring Mr. Koren.

Ed Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Link here to his website.

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An Early Release of Next Week’s Cover

As happens every so often, the magazine has early-released its upcoming cover (cover artist: Barry Blitt). You can read about it here. 

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Colin Tom Pencilled

Jane Mattimoe’s Case For Pencils’ spotlight falls on Colin Tom. Mr. Tom began contributing to The New Yorker in 2015.

Go here to read all about Mr. Tom’s  tools of the trade.

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Live New Yorker Cartoons On Late Night With Seth Meyers

The New Yorker‘s editor, David Remnick (above left) returned to NBC’s “Late Night With Seth Meyers” for the seventh installment of “Live New Yorker Cartoons” (this one carried the tag, “Raiders of the Lost Snark”). Cartoons by Liam Walsh, Liana Finck, Jon Adams, Zach Kanin, and Mick Stevens were brought to life.  See it here.

And:  here’s Mr. Remnick’s sit-down chat with Mr. Meyers. It includes some interesting cartoon talk.

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Cartoon Companion Rates The Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” focus on all the cartoons in the latest issue of the New Yorker (the one with the row boat on the cover). Read it here.

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of September 3, 2018

Again with an early release cover! Link here to see what the cover artist, Barry Blitt, had to say about his latest effort (shown above, right). 

The cartoons:

Fourteen cartoons in this first issue of September: seven by women, seven by men. No more mentions here of gender balance/imbalance unless/until there’s an all female cartoonists issue (or an all male issue returns).

It’s becoming a Spill habit to single out one or two or three cartoons per issue that especially grab my attention.  This issue it’s two cartoons.  Paul Noth’s tranquil fishing scenario (p.24) is lovely.  A perfectly written caption. One teeny tiny graphic quibble: the fishing lines are identically parallel, creating what looks to be two sides of a box (the kind of box that some cartoons sit within).  Anywho, a wonderful drawing, deserving of a round of applause.

The other cartoon of note (found on page 19): Carolita Johnson gives us a motorcyclist speaking to his passenger. Ms. Johnson’s caption reads:

As a long-time happily married motorcycling cartoonist, I suppose this is a golden opportunity to chime in about marriage and motorcycles; I’ll just stick with motorcycles.

Here’s a motorcycle drawing of mine that appeared in the New Yorker, May 27, 1985:

Motorcycles have been around in New Yorker cartoons for a long long time; the motorcyclists were often motorcycle cops. I’m not going deep into the history here, but just mention a few cartoonists who’ve given us some great drawings. Motorcycles and/or motorcyclists as the subject are numerous; even more plentiful are motorcycles/motorcyclists as part of the scenery. A Peter Arno cartoon in the issue of December 7th 1929  (“We want to report a stolen car”) that made waves for its sexual innuendo featured a beautifully drawn Indian motorcycle. Among colleagues past and present who’ve depicted motorcycles and/or motorcyclists : Roberta MacDonald, Garrett Price, Anthony Taber, Kim Warp, Carl Rose, Edward Koren, Farley Katz, Joe Dator, Leo Cullum, Trevor Hoey, Maddie Dai, Michael Crawford, Lee Lorenz, Jack Ziegler, Arnie Levin, and yours truly.  Of these cartoonists, two that I know of (other than myself) have ridden motorcycles: Mr. Crawford and Mr. Levin.  Mr. Ziegler had plenty of fun depicting motorcycle gang members “colors” ( patches on jackets that identify a motorcyclist’s club association). Here’s an evergreen of his from February 27, 1989:

— See you next week

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exhibit of Interest: Not OK, Wild West Edition; Book Launch of Interest: Liana Finck’s Passing For Human; Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons; Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Not OK: Wild West Edition

Here’s an article about the upcoming Wild West Edition of the Not OK exhibit.  You’ll remember the first Not OK exhibit was held here in the east last Fall. 

The cartoonists in the show:

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Book Launch of Interest: Liana Finck’s Passing For Human

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Cartoon Companion Rates the Latest New Yorker Cartoons

The CC‘s “Max” & “Simon” return with their 1-6 ratings for each and every cartoon in the the August 27th issue. Seth Fleishman’s mirror ball drawing is awarded the Top Toon blue ribbon.  Read it here.

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Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

 Here’s what Barry Blitt had to say about his cover for next week’s issue. 

This is the magazine’s second early release cover in a row. Just a thought: I wonder if the powers that be at One World Trade Center have ever considered running a Daily Cover (like the Daily Cartoon, and Daily Shouts).  That would allow the magazine to respond in-a-flash to headlines (as they obviously are wont to do more often than not).  It would also allow the print cover, which sits around homes all week, to bear an evergreen image (of course, some Daily covers could be evergreens as well; history will judge, I suppose).