The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker “Cartoon Takeover” Issue Of December 30, 2019

The Cover: The “Cartoon Takeover” theme begins on Robert Sikoryak’s cover as cartoon characters whitewash text. Read a Q&A with the cover artist here.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Right off the bat, it should be noted that this issue is unlike the “Cartoon Issue” once produced this time of the year beginning in 1997; that series ended after a fifteen year run. It is also unlike the “Best Cartoons Of The Year” series begun in 2011, and ended five years later. This Cartoon Takeover is unlike those in that it contains a ton of archival material (the issue carries the descriptive “A Semi-Archival Issue” on the Table of Contents). While elements from the Cartoon Issues, and Best Of series are here: the graphic spreads for instance, and a profile of a cartoonist — the old tropes features thankfully haven’t resurfaced. This Takeover is a new and welcome creature, with a pulse I associate with the very oldest issues of The New Yorker.  As befits the issue’s theme, The New Yorker‘s cartoon editor, Emma Allen, has taken over Talk’s “Comments” section, leading us into the action.

As you see from the number of cartoonists listed above, this new issue is packed with cartoons from a wide swath of the New Yorker‘s history, with work by such luminaries as Helen Hokinson, Barbara Shermund, James Thurber, William Steig, Gahan Wilson, and Steinberg represented. Nice to see Peter Arno’s ultra-famous, “Well, back to the old drawing board” included! Many cartoons from the archives are here as “favorites” selected by cartoonists and non-cartoonists. Free standing cartoons — what you normally see in every issue of The New Yorker — are also from the archives. I was very happy to see one of my favorite semi-modern cartoons included: Joe Duffy’s meta Care to join me in panel #3? (originally published, October 31, 2011).

Not whitewashed over by cartoon characters is a personal favorite John Updike piece (originally published in 1997) on his cartoonist roots, and terrif archival pieces, including two by two late-greats, Veronica Geng and Dorothy Parker. It’s an issue of a little something, and often a lot of something, for just about everyone who loves New Yorker cartoons.

The Rea Irvin Masthead Watch: Normally on the Monday Tilley Watch I woefully acknowledge another issue gone by without the return of Rea Irvin’s iconic masthead.  Since the Spring of 2017, a redrawn version has stood awkwardly in its place. This special Cartoon Takeover issue thankfully replaces the redraw with an Ed Steed take on the Irvin masthead. Mr. Steed’s playfulness is a refreshing delight, incorporating, to my eye, some Steigian/Steinberg elements.

With next week’s issue of The New Yorker the first of 2020, this would be the perfect opportunity to use Mr.Steed’s comic break as the moment to bring back Mr. Irvin’s classic masthead — and really now, why not bring it back?

Below, Mr. Irvin’s beautiful, now moth-balled masthead, and Mr. Steed’s fun take below it.

The Weekend Spill: A Memorial For New Yorker Artist Dana Fradon; The New Yorker Artists Who Contributed To Newyorker.com This Week; Meet The Artist (1943): Barbara Shermund

A Memorial For Dana Fradon

A Memorial is set for The New Yorker artist, Dana Fradon, who passed away this Fall.  The public is invited.

Photo: l-r, The New Yorker artist, Charles Saxon, The New Yorker‘s former Art Editor, James Geraghty, Mr. Fradon, and The New Yorker artist, Whitney Darrow, Jr..

Photo courtesy Sarah Geraghty Herndon

Memorial Info:

Where: the Bethel Library, Bethel CT

When: Sunday December 8th, from 2pm – 4pm.

Here’s Mr. Fradon’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Dana Fradon Born, Chicago, Illinois, 1922. Died, October 3, 2019, Woodstock, NY.  Studied at the Art Institute of Chicago prior to service in the U.S. Army Air Forces during World War II. Following his service, he attended the Art Students League of New York, New Yorker work: May 1, 1948 – April 21, 2003. Collection: Insincerely Yours (Scribners, 1978) To read Ink Spill’s 2013 interview with Mr. Fradon, “Harold Ross’s Last Cartoonist” link here.

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The Tilley Watch Online, November 25-29, 2019

A listing of the New Yorker artists who contributed to newyorker.com this week

The Daily Cartoon: Julia Suits, Pat Achilles, Christopher Weyant, Lila Ash, and Teresa Burns Parkhurst

Daily Shouts: Ali Fitzgerald, Emily Flake, Lars Kenseth, Eugenia Viti ( with Irving Ruan).

…and Barry Blitt’s Kvetchbook

…and Culture Desk pieces by Jenny Kroik, and Roz Chast.

See all the above and more here.

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Meet The Artist (1943): Barbara Shermund

Another in a series of self portraits of New Yorker artists included in the Meet The Artist catalog published by the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in 1943.

Barbara Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barbara Shermund (to the left: a Shermund self portrait) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

 

Gahan Wilson, Cartoon Great, Needs Our Help; The Weekend Spill: From Frank Modell’s Library: Introduction To Cartooning By Richard Taylor; Article Of Interest: Edward Koren; Barbara Shermund’s Marker; The Tilley Watch, September 23-27, 2019; Fave Photo Of The Weekend: Liza Donnelly & Jason Chatfield In Thurber’s Hometown

The Go Fund Me Campaign For Gahan Wilson

As most of you know, Gahan Wilson, one of the cartoon world’s greats, has been in need of assistance over this past year. A Go Fund Me effort set up by his step-son, Paul Winters is now back up to help with issues related to Gahan’s most recent difficulties. Read more here, and help if you can.

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From Frank Modell’s Library: Introduction To Cartooning By Richard Taylor

Among the signed cartoon books in the Spill‘s library, Frank Modell’s copy of Richard Taylor’s Introduction To Cartooning is a special favorite. It’s the only instructional book in our collection by a New Yorker cartoonist that belonged to a New Yorker cartoonist.

 

The book was published in 1947, the year after Mr. Modell began his long association with The New Yorker (as well as a contributor, he was, in his earliest years there, assistant to art editor James Geraghty).  What you see in Modell’s copy of Taylor’s book is what you see in many a textbook: essential passages underlined, circled, sometimes with arrows pointing out a word or two.  Many of the selections go to the heart of what it takes to be career cartoonist. Mr Modell learned his lessons well: he spent over half a century at The New Yorker, contributing well over a thousand drawings, as well as half a dozen covers.

Here are just a few pages from Taylor’s book with Modell’s marked passages.

And a nice surprise at the very end of the book on the inside cover, Modell added some sketches:

Richard Taylor’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Richard Taylor (self portrait from Meet the Artist) Born in Fort William, Ontario, Sept. 18, 1902. Died in 1970. NYer work: 1935 -1967. Collections: The Better Taylors ( Random House, 1944, and a reprint edition by World Publishing, 1945), Richard Taylor’s Wrong Bag (Simon & Schuster, 1961). Taylor also authored Introduction to Cartooning ( Watson-Guptill, 1947). From Taylor’s introduction: the “book is not intended to be a ‘course in cartooning’…instead, it attempts to outline a plan of study — something to be kept at the elbow to steer by.”

 

Frank Modell’s entry:

Frank Modell Born, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, September 6, 1917. Died, May 27, 2016, Guilford, Connecticut. New Yorker work: 1946–1997. Mr. Modell began his New Yorker career as assistant to the Art Editor, James Geraghty. He soon began contributing his cartoons (and cartoon ideas for others), with his first drawing appearing July 20, 1946. Besides his work for The New Yorker, he was a children’s book author and an actor (he appeared, most notably, in Woody Allen’s 1980 film, Stardust Memories). Key collection: Stop Trying To Cheer Me Up! (Dodd, Mead, 1978).

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Article Of Interest: Edward Koren

From The Manchester Journal, September 27, 2019, “‘Into The Wild’ With A Vermont Cartoonist; Ed Koren’s Drawings Explore The Funny Side Of The Rural-Urban Divide”.

Mr. Koren began contributing to The New Yorker in 1962. Visit his website here.

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Barbara Shermund’s Marker

Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery updates us on the grave marker for the great New Yorker artist Barbara Shermund.  Read here.

Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work).

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A  end of the week listing of the New Yorker cartoonists who contributed to the magazine’s Daily Cartoon and/or Daily Shouts

The Daily Cartoon: Teresa Burns Parkhurst, Brendan Loper, Lila Ash, Evan Lian, and J.A.K.

Daily Shouts: Liana Finck

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Fave Photo Of the Weekend: Donnelly and Chatfield In Columbus, Ohio

Two New Yorker cartoonists ran into each other in James Thurber‘s Hometown of Columbus, Ohio.

Mr. Chatfield is attending the Cartoon Crossroads Columbus convention and Ms. Donnelly is there attending the AAEC 2019 Annual Convention.

 

 

From Newyorker.com’s Culture Desk: Liza Donnelly On The Art Of Barbara Shermund

A Shermund self-portrait

From newyorker.com, February 17, 2019, “The Lovely Nineteen-Twenties Flapper Cartoons Of Barbara Shermund” Liza Donnelly writes about one of her favorite New Yorker cartoonists, the late great, Barbara Shermund.

Ms. Shermund’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z

Barbara Shermund : Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

Ms. Donnelly’s entry on the A-Z

Liza Donnelly : Born, Washington, D.C. New Yorker work: 1982 – Key book: Funny Ladies: The New Yorker’s Greatest Women Cartoonists and Their Cartoons (Prometheus, 2005). Edited:  Sex & Sensibility: Ten Women Examine the Lunacy of Modern Love…in 200 Cartoons ( Twelve, 2008). Cartoon Marriage ( with Michael Maslin) (Random House, 2009), When Do They Serve the Wine?( Chronicle, 2010). Women On Men (Narrative Library, 2013). Donnelly also wrote and illustrated a popular series of dinosaur books for children ( Dinosaur Day, Dinosaur Beach, Dinosaur Halloween, etc.) all published by Scholastic.  She is the CBS News Resident Cartoonist. Website: http://www.lizadonnelly.com

Society Of Illustrators Names Hall Of Fame Inductees; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist: Shannon Wheeler; More Gerberg; Event Of Interest: Chris Ware; Even More Shermund; Interviews Of Interest: Bob Eckstein, Gahan Wilson

From The Daily Cartoonist, February 14, 2019, “Society Of illustrators 2019 Hall of Fame” — Read here! (Spoiler: Two New Yorker folks named!)

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Today’s Daily Cartoon

Today’s Daily cartoon, tuned in to today’s heart-shaped celebration, is by Shannon Wheeler, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 2009.

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More Gerberg

Mr. Gerberg’s first New Yorker cartoon, published in the issue of April 10, 1965.

From amNewYork, February 14, 2019, “Mort Gerberg retrospective spotlights cartoonnist’s witty views of NY life”

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From The Albany Times-Union, February 12, 2019, Cartoonist Chris Ware Speaks, Signs Books.

Mr. Ware’s Monograph, published in 2017

Mr. Ware began contributing to The New Yorker in 1999.

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Even More Shermund

A Shermund self-portrait

From Columbus Monthly, “Burying Barbara Shermund, A Forgotten Cartoonist” — more on the late great Ms. Shermund. Read here.

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Interview of Interest: Bob Eckstein

Bob Eckstein’s fabulous Snowman book

A radio interview with a lot of snowman talk (as you’d expect when the World’s Greatest Snowman Expert is the interviewee), and some cartoon talk as well at the close. Listen here.

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Interview of Interest: Gahan Wilson

Jason Sacks interviews Gahan Wilson. Listen here.

Mr. Wilson began contributing to The New Yorker in 1976. Link here to his website.