Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1: Peter Arno; Shanahan’s Sharks

Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 1

Warren Bernard, author of the wonderful book, Cartoons For Victory, as well as Executive Director of The Small Press Expo, has generously allowed the Spill access to hundreds of images he has collected that depict advertising work executed by New Yorker cartoonists. The Spill will post these from time-to-time. This is not an all-inclusive survey, but a look back at some interesting work mostly lost to time (many of these ads were unknown to me until recently).

We’ll start with a handful of ads featuring the unmistakable drawings of Peter Arno. Arno’s drawings were in high demand by Madison Avenue during the four decades he contributed to The New Yorker. They were the lucrative sideline that went a long way to helping him live the Park Avenue penthouse life he at times lived.

I’m only showing a few of his ads here, and not including the entire run of Pepsi-Cola ads that so riled Harold Ross (the New Yorker’s founder and first editor) — those will be for another time.  Also for another time: the Gem Razor ad campaign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mr. Bernard has helpfully identified the date of each ad:  Alemite (1949); Kindness (1968); Calvert Reserve (1944); Jockey (1939); Ry-Krisp (1941)

Here’s Mr. Arno’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:


Peter Arno (Pictured above. Source: Look, 1938) Born Curtis Arnoux Peters, Jr., January 8, 1904, New York City. Died February 22, 1968, Port Chester, NY. New Yorker work: 1925 -1968. Key collection: Ladies & Gentlemen (Simon & Schuster, 1951) The Foreword is by Arno. For far more on Arno please check out my biography of him, Peter Arno: The Mad Mad World of The New Yorker’s Greatest Cartoonist (Regan Arts, 2016).

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Shanahan’s Sharks

Attempted Bloggery has found a Danny Shanahan New Yorker cover that’s been enhanced by the artist himself.

Mr. Nadler, who runs the AB, notes it’s a fine way to kick off the Discovery Channel’s Shark Week.

Link here to see Danny Shanahan’s New Yorker work on the magazine’s Cartoon Bank site.

 

 

 

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; A Barbara Shermund Rejected Cover; A Courthouse Opening

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

The CC boys are back with their thoughts and idiosyncratic ratings for the cartoons appearing in the latest issue of The New Yorker. In this issue are, among others, cartoons featuring dogs, doctors, tombstones, and fish.  Read all about everything here.

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A Barbara Shermund Rejected Cover

Attempted Bloggery continues its week-long look at proposed, but rejected, New Yorker covers.  Today’s is by the great Barbara Shermund. Check it out here. 

Here Ms. Shermund’s entry on the A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Barbara Shermund (self portrait, above) Born, San Francisco. 1899. Studied at The California School of Fine Arts. Died, 1978, New Jersey. New Yorker work: June 13, 1925 thru September 16, 1944. 8 covers and 599 cartoons. Shermund’s later. post-New Yorker work was featured in Esquire. (See Liza Donnelly’s book, Funny Ladies — a history of The New Yorker’s women cartoonists — for more on Shermund’s life and work)

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Cartoon Opening in a Courthouse

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There’ve been a whole lot of cartoons set in courtrooms, but I wonder how many cartoons have been in a courthouse. Bob Mankoff, who began contributing to The New Yorker in 1977 (and is now cartoon editor of Esquire), had an opening in the Federal Building Eastern District Courthouse yesterday (it’s in Brooklyn). Courtesy of cartoonist and author,  Bob Eckstein, we have a couple of photographs from the event:

 

Fave Photos of the Day: Liana Finck’s Opening; Attempted Bloggery Looks at Proposed New Yorker Cover Art

Fave Photos of the Day: Liana Finck’s Opening

Liza Donnelly put on her Ink Spill photographer’s hat last night while attending Liana Fincks opening at the Equity Gallery in lower Manhattan (that’s Ms. Finck holding the flowers).  My thanks to Ms. Donnelly for providing the photos below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Attempted Bloggery Looks at Proposed New Yorker Cover Art

All this week, Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery is looking at cover art proposed, but rejected by The New Yorker.  Here’s a portion of a piece submitted by Julian de Miskey.  For the whole piece, and a lot more info, go here.

Book of Interest: Friedman’s Chosen People; A Searle Reject; A Tilley Paperweight

Book of Interest: Friedman’s Chosen People

Due in the Fall from Fantagraphics: a new collection from New Yorker cover artist, Drew Friedman.  From the publisher: Featuring over 100 of Drew Friedman’s hyper-realistic portraits of the greats, the near-greats, and the not-so-greats, created over the past decade. Artists, cartoonists, comedians, musicians, actors, politicians, the famous and the infamous, these chosen people are just that: People chosen to be rendered by the man Boing Boing calls “The greatest living portrait artist.” 

More book info here.      And here’s the link for Mr. Friedman’s website.

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A Rejected Searle Cover

Attempted Bloggery has a really nice post about this beautiful rejected New Yorker cover by Ronald Searle. To see the full cover and so much more, go here.

 

 

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A Tilley Paperweight

Finally, here’s one of my favorite objets d’Tilley: a paperweight sold some years back (still around on various online sites, including Etsy). For the completist, there’s another Tilley-related paperweight available: Eustacia Tilley, R. O. Blechman’s take on Rea Irvin’s creation for the New Yorker‘s inaugural issue. Eustacia was the cover for the magazine’s “Women’s Issue” way back in 1996.

 

Thurber’s Dogs Set to Music; The Spill Responds to a Response; Time Traveling: Saturday Evening Post Cartoons From the 1950s

Thurber’s Dogs Set to Music

Attempted Bloggery has posted this curio: Thurber’s Dogs set to the music of Peter Schickele.  Until yesterday, I’d never heard of this. 

It’s not the first time Thurber’s work has crossed over from print to music. In one of the many high points of Thurber’s career, his best-seller, The Thurber Carnival was transformed into a  a very successful playwith Thurber himself taking the stage. 

A soundtrack for the show was issued –it includes a booklet of his drawings.

The play won a Special Tony Award in 1960.  Video exists of Thurber accepting the award (with Burgess Meredith). You can see it here (Thurber takes the stage at the 25:50 mark).

 

 

 

 

 

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Blog of Interest

In response to The Spill‘s mention of Arnold Zwicky’s Blog the other day,  Mr. Zwicky posted this on his site:

“Note from Michael Maslin on his Inkspill blog (“New Yorker Cartoonists News and Events”), appearing as a comment on a recent posting of mine here:

As you see, Mr. Zwicky’s blog is “mostly about language”; when it’s about the language of New Yorker cartoons it will be mentioned here

This could get burdensome. I’ve posted here over a hundred times about New Yorker cartoons and covers; these are indexed in a Page on this blog, with subpages for (so far) 25 specific artists…”

Ink Spill’s response to Mr. Zwicky’s response:

Dear Mr. Zwicky,

It is a burden The Spill will happily bear.

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Time-Traveling: Saturday Evening Post Cartoons From the 1950s

Mike Lynch’s has posted Eisenhower-era  Saturday Evening Post cartoons (and a few that appeared in Collier’s) including this one from the late great New Yorker cartoonist,  Barney Tobey.

Here’s Mr. Tobey’s A-Z entry on the Spill:

Barney Tobey (photo above from Think Small, a book of humor produced by Volkswagon) Born in New York City, July, 18, 1906, died March 27, 1989, New York. New Yorker work: 1929 -1986. Essential collection: B. Tobey of The New Yorker (Dodd Mead & Co., 1983)

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Note:  An exhibit of Bob Mankoff’s work will run from July 20 through Oct. 20 at the Charles P. Sifton Gallery in the Theodore Roosevelt United States Courthouse in Brooklyn.