A New Yorker Memorial Day Cover from 1965

Looking at Memorial Day covers in The Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker 1925-1989 this morning, this fabulous piece by Arthur Getz jumped out. 

Here’s Mr. Getz’s entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

Arthur Getz Born, Passaic, New Jersey, 1913; died, 1996. New Yorker work: 1938 -1988. Primarily a cover artist, he had one cartoon published: March 15, 1958. (You might say his career was a mirror image of George Price’s, who was one of the most prolific cartoonists, with over 1200 published, and one cover). According to the official Getz website, he was the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, having 213 appear during the fifty years he contributed to the magazine. The official Getz website, containing his biography: www.getzart.com/

 

The Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 21, 2019

An interesting cover this week, reminiscent of Arthur Getz‘s great city landscapes: a dark city view with a small area of bright lights slicing through. That contrast of dark with dramatic light was close to a Getzian specialty (similar scenes were also beautifully painted by a number of other New Yorker artists through the years). If you can, get hold of The Complete Book of Covers From The New Yorker (Knopf, 1989) — you won’t regret it.

For more on the current cover, you can read about the artist, Pascal Campion here.

The Cartoons/Cartoonists:




Some cartoons of note in this issue:

The solid drawing on page 22 of two couples about to cross paths on a suspended narrow rope bridge marks Hartley Lin‘s cartoon debut in the magazine.

As happily the case with Lars Kenseth‘s work, his stone man on page 30 is something outside the norm.

Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell‘s cinematic post-party drawing on page 51 is terrific, as is Olivia de Recat’s Alarmist Clock on page 63.

On page 59, another cartoonist’s New Yorker debut: Karl Stevens.

Mr. Lin and Mr. Stevens are the first new New Yorker cartoonists of 2019, and the 25th and 26th new cartoonists making their debut in the magazine since Emma Allen became the New Yorker‘s cartoon editor in May of 2017.

…before I turn out the lights on this post, let us not forget that Rea Irvin’s beautiful Talk masthead (below) is still in storage. Read all about it here.


Auction Of Interest: Peter Arno, William Steig, Arnie Levin, Charles Addams, Frank Modell, Charles Saxon, And More

Thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for alerting the Spill to the new Swann catalog, which contains an abundance of New Yorker art.  A highlight, shown above, is Peter Arno’s New Yorker cover of April 4, 1964. Here’s what it looked like as the published cover:

Other New Yorker work offered by Charles Addams, William Steig, Charles Barsotti, Arnie Levin, Richard Decker, Frank Modell, James Daugherty (aka “Jimmie-the-Ink”), Heidi Goennel, Garrett Price, Mischa Richter, Charles Saxon, George Price, Theodore Haupt, Arthur Getz, R.O. Blechman and the King of the Gagwriters, Richard McCallister. Empty the piggy bank!

 

 

The Tilley Watch Online, June 25-29, 2018; On Attempted Bloggery: More Getz

The Daily Cartoon was all Trump all the time this week (whether directly or indirectly).  The contributing cartoonists: Pia Guerra, Michael Shaw, Brendan Loper, Pat Byrnes, and Bob Eckstein

Over on the Daily Shouts, the contributing New Yorker cartoonists included Liana Finck, Emily Flake, and Tim Hamilton.

You can see all the work above and more by going here.

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More Getz

Stephen Nadler’s Attempted Bloggery zeroes in on some more work by the late great New Yorker cover artist, Arthur Getz.  Read it all here!

The Tilley Watch Online: June 11-16, 2018; More Arthur Getz (at The Hotchkiss Library of Sharon)

Yet another Trumpian week for the Daily Cartoon. 

The participating cartoonists:  Danny Shanahan, one of the magazine’s modern masters, appeared twice in the week, with his second a nod to the climbing racoon we all fell in love with; Lars Kenseth, whose one-of-a-kind drawings also appeared twice (neither was a racoon drawing, unfortunately), and Lisa Rothstein, possibly making her Daily debut (someone please advise if this is incorrect).

And the Daily Shouts contributing New Yorker cartoonists were Tom Chitty Jeremy Nguyen with David Ostow, Liana Finck, and honorary New Yorker cartoonist, Colin Stokes (he’s the magazine’s assistant cartoon editor, and… he’s co-written a published New Yorker cartoon or two).

You can see all of the above work, and more, here.

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More Arthur Getz

I recently drove over to Sharon, Connecticut to catch the Arthur Getz exhibit at the Hotchkiss Library of Sharon. It runs til the end of this month, so hurry and go before it’s gone! One of the New Yorker‘s great cartoonists, Peter Steiner, joined me to tour the art on the walls, including the original art for the terrific cover shown above. This is a large piece (my guess is it’s about a yard tall), graphically powerful as a cover and even more so when you’re up close to the original (it’s currently hanging along a staircase). There are a number of other originals like it (in the wow category), but also a good number of small pieces (many “killed” covers) as well as some pastoral watercolors. Many of the pieces are for sale. A portfolio of work sits in one of the rooms — you can breeze through and pick up the original art for as close a look as you want.

Getz’s New Yorker work really shines through in this show. Mr. Steiner and I spent some time gazing at them, marveling at Getz’s ability to grasp the big picture so beautifully. I’m reluctant to label any specific period of The New Yorker as golden or aluminum or silver, or whatever, but as Mr. Getz’s career spanned 50 years (1938-1988)  his work certainly was being published during the magazine’s so-called Golden Age.

As mentioned on the Spill not long ago there’s a companion exhibit at the nearby Moviehouse in Millerton (NY) featuring much more of Getz’s New Yorker work. You really need to see that too (it runs through the end of August).