Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover; Cover Exhibit Of Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics; Addams Hometown Throws Addams Fest in October

 Early Reveal: Next Week’s New Yorker Cover

Upcoming New Yorker covers are usually posted early Monday morning, but occasionally we get an advance look.  Barry Blitt is the cover artist for next week’s issue. 

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Exhibit Of  Interest: Underground Heroes: New York Transit In The Comics

Opening today at the New York Transit Museum in downtown Brooklyn, this fabulous exhibit  comprised of “satirical cartoons, comic strips and comic books from the 19th to 21st centuries.” Works by over 120 artists are represented including the following New Yorker contributors: Roz Chast, Peter Kuper, Eric Drooker, Ben Katchor, Julia Wertz, and Art Young.  Along with the art, there will be panel discussions, gallery talks and sketch nights.

For all the info go here.

(cartoon courtesy of Peter Kuper)

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Addams Hometown Throws  Addams Fest in October

Mark your calendar: Charles Addams’ hometown will hold its first Addams Fest over three days in October (26, 27, and 28). Lectures, exhibits and screenings are planned.  Read about it here.

Above: a screen shot of a very short teaser video for the fest.

Here’s Mr. Addams entry on the Spill‘s A-Z:

 

 

 

 

Charles Addams (above) Born in Westfield, New Jersey, January  7, 1912. Died September 29, 1988, New York City. New Yorker work: 1932 – 1988 * the New Yorker has published his work posthumously. One of the giants of The New Yorker’s  stable of artists.  Key cartoon collections: While all of Addams’ collections are worthwhile, here are three that are particular favorites; Homebodies (Simon & Schuster, 1954), The Groaning Board (Simon & Schuster, 1964), Creature Comforts (Simon & Schuster, 1981). In 1991 Knopf published The World of Chas Addams, a retrospective collection. Visit the Addams Foundation website for far more information : http://www.charlesaddams.com/

 

A New Yorker State of Mind Enters 1929; Hoff Week Continues on Attempted Bloggery; More Spills with Charles Addams & Art Young

A New Yorker State of Mind Enters 1929

One of the Spill‘s favorite blogs has rounded the corner of 1928, and has entered 1929.  The issue above, with art by the incredible Rea Irvin, has always been a favorite.  Visit the blog here.

Here’s Rea Irvin’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Rea Irvin (pictured above. Self portrait above from Meet the Artist) *Born, San Francisco, 1881; died in the Virgin Islands,1972. Irvin was the cover artist for the New Yorker’s first issue, February 21, 1925. He was the magazine’s first art editor, holding the position from 1925 until 1939 when James Geraghty assumed the title. Irvin became art director and remained in that position until William Shawn succeeded Harold Ross. Irvin’s last original work for the magazine was the magazine’s cover of July 12, 1958. The February 21, 1925 Eustace Tilley cover had been reproduced every year on the magazine’s anniversary until 1994, when R. Crumb’s Tilley-inspired cover appeared. Tilley has since reappeared, with other artists substituting from time-to-time.

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Hoff Week Continues on Attempted Bloggery

And another fave blog, Attempted Bloggery continues its salute to Syd Hoff. Check it out here!

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Charles Addams is among the nominated for the Eisner Hall of Fame, 2018. Details here (with the complete list of nominees). 

…a short appreciation of Art Young here from the Washington Times-Reporter. 

 

Interview of Interest: Joe Dator; Society of Illustrators Art Young Panel Discussion w/ Kunz, Brodner & Spiegelman; A Smorgasbord of Cartoons by Pat Byrnes

Interview of Interest: Joe Dator

The Cartoon Companion has posted Part 2 of its interview with one of the New Yorker‘s best.  Read it here

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Society of Illustrators Art Young Panel

Check it out! Steve Brodner, Anita Kunz and Art Spiegelman will be at the Society of Illustrators on January 11, discussing Art Young.  All the info here.  (My thanks to Stephen Nadler of Attempted Bloggery for bringing this event to my attention).

Here’s Art Young’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z: Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, NYC @ The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. New Yorker work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery

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A Smorgasbord of Cartoons by Pat Byrnes

From Esthetic Lens, January 4, 2018, “Comic Relief: The Art of Pat Byrnes”

To see even more of Mr. Byrnes’s work, visit his web site.

 

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Dissected on Cartoon Companion; Chast’s New Book Reviewed; Exhibit of Interest: “Unnatural Election”; Conversation of Interest: Art Young Authors Discuss the Artist; Event of Interest: Julia Wertz in Brooklyn

Latest New Yorker Cartoons Dissected On Cartoon Companion

The Cartoon Companion is back with a look at the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker.  The CC’s “Max” and “Simon” inspect cartoons by Joe Dator, J.A.K., BEK, Barbara Smaller, and Paul Noth,  among others. While on the site be sure to read part 2 of their interview with Amy Hwang. 

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Chast’s New Book Reviewed

From The Berkshire Eagle, September 14, 2017, ” Letter From New York: A Graphic look at city via memoir, maps”  — the first review I’ve seen of Roz Chast’s upcoming Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York

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Exhibit of Interest: Unnatural Election

From New Jersey Stage, September 14, 2017, “Puffin Cultural Forum Presents “Unnatural Election: Artists Respond to the impact of the 2016 US Presidential Election” — according to the article, this is the third physical installation of the exhibit (the previous two: New York and Alaska). 

Among the many artists represented in the show are Andrea Arroyo,  Barry Blitt, Steve Brodner, Sue Coe, Liza Donnelly, Randall Enos, Felipe Galindo, Peter Kuper and Robert Sikoryak.

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Conversation of Interest: Art Young Authors Discuss the Artist

From The Comics Journal, September 14, 2017, “Art Young, To Laugh That We May Not Weep: A Conversation with Glenn Bray and Frank M. Young” — this discussion about  the great Art Young, whose work appeared in the New Yorker from 1925 through 1933.

— thanks to Mike Rhode for bringing this piece to the Spill’s attention

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Event of Interest: Wertz at Brooklyn Public Library

From Brooklyn Library.org, this notice of an appearance, October 11th,  by Julia Wertz, whose latest book is Tenements, Towers & Trash.

 

 

 

P. G. Garetto Added to the Spill’s One Club; Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 9: Mary Gibson; Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated; Talkin’ Bout Art Young

I have Joe Dator’s latest New Yorker cartoon to thank for my coming upon the cartoon shown by P. G. Garetto. Found in the issue of September 3, 1938, this was the first and last time (Ms. or Mr.) Garetto’s work appeared in the New Yorker, thus an immediate qualifier for the Spill’s One Club. The club is limited to cartoonists who have contributed just one drawing to the magazine in their career.  Every member is identified on the Spill’s A-Z by the red top-hatted  fellow you see below. 

But back to Mr. Dator.  After seeing his drawing I wanted to know how many other zebra drawings had appeared in The New Yorker (less than two dozen). I was looking through the magazine’s database when P.G. Garetto’s name showed up.  I knew I’d never seen it before. A further New Yorker database search turned up no other contributions from this artist.  So welcome to the One Club, P.G. Garetto!

I’ve shown some of the text surrounding the cartoon because of the unusual placement of the two dots just above the drawing.  These two dots have been appearing below the magazine’s cartoons every now and then since the magazine began. I’ve never seen them appear above a cartoon,  until now.  Brendan Gill, in his book Here At The New Yorker, wrote about the dots:

“…unless I have been deliberately kept in ignorance of their true meaning throughout all these years, the dots (which can indeed be found under some of our drawings) are, like so many other things in the magazine, vestiges of notions of design that originated in the twenties and that have survived…”

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Advertising Work by New Yorker Cartoonists, Part 9: Mary Gibson

Mary Gibson had a brief run in the New Yorker, with eight drawings published in  seven years.

In Liza Donnelly’s Funny Ladies, a history of women cartoonists in the New Yorker, she says of Ms. Gibson’s work: “She…began by drawing cartoons about women in the military, which included subjects ranging from the stocking shortage to WACs needing a hairdresser…after the war was over, Gibson’s cartoons looked more like Hokinson imitations and were concerned with insecure, middle-aged women.” 

Dates for these ads: 1950 for the upper row; 1951 for the bottom row.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mary Gibson’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Mary Gibson (self portrait from Best Cartoons of the Year 1947) New Yorker work: eight drawings, June 26, 1943 – April 29, 1950.

Note: My thanks to Warren Bernard, the Executive Director of SPX, for allowing Ink Spill access to his collection of advertisements by New Yorker artists.

 

 

 

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Latest New Yorker Cartoons Rated

Max and Simon, The Cartoon Companion’s anonymous duo, are back with a look at all the cartoons in the current double issue.  Among the drawings rated and inspected:  a case of leg-cast mistaken identity, concerned neighbors, mystery meat on sale, a musical jury, and an artist working, selectively, in 3-D. Read it all here.

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Talkin’ Bout Art Young

From the New Yorker’s Culture Desk, August 2, 2017,  “Art Young: Cartoonist For the Ages” — this piece by Francoise Mouly and Art Spiegelman in conjunction with the August 1st publication of  That We May Not Weep: The Life & Times of Art Young  (Fantagraphics) by Glenn Bray and Frank M. Young. (Mr. Spiegelman  contributes an essay to the book). 

Here’s Art Young’s entry on the Spill’s A-Z:

Art Young (above) Born January 14, 1866, Illinois. Died December 29, New York City at The Hotel Irving. An online biography. 1943. New Yorker work: 1925 -1933. The Art Young Gallery