The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue of January 27, 2020; David Salle Incorporates Peter Arno Drawings

The Cover: A NYC subway situation, by Luci Gutierrez.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

Every first run through the cartoons in the latest issue of The New Yorker  I feel as if I’m browsing the goods behind glass in a pastry shop’s display case, appreciating the variety, before beginning to narrow down which one to select, if in the buying mood. In this new issue, a number of pastries caught my eye. In no particular order here are some favorites.

…Sofia Warren’s four part color piece (it’s on page 36) fits nicely in the New Yorker school of cartoons that go beyond eliciting a laugh, capturing a lovely moment.  An earlier example of one of those moments is Arnie Levin’s classic multi-panel New Yorker drawing, “It’s only the wind”  from September 18, 1978 (it originally ran across the top of two facing pages, four panels to a page):

…Christopher Weyant’s  drawing on page 40, of a fellow leaving his blimp at a parking garage, is a text book example of the classic New Yorker one-two punch cartoon (as defined by Peter Arno).

…On page 22 you’ll find Danny Shanahan’s terrific drawing of cats with a tech problem.

…A perfect look on the guy’s face who’s tasting olive oil in Lars Kenseth’s cartoon (p. 42).  As mentioned on the Spill not long ago, veteran New Yorker cartoonist Henry Martin once said to me that certain cartoonists “draw funny” — it was meant as a compliment. Mr. Kenseth draws funny.

…The woman standing beside Liana Finck’s former dog walker (p.55) ever-so-slightly echoes Edward Gorey’s elongated figures. Ms. Finck’s drawings remind me, in a way, of Michael Shaw’s — the lines delivered as if direct from the muse.

…also in the issue: Insecure(?) Gods (by Hartley Lin), an update on Dolly,  the cloned sheep (Navied Mahdavian), criminals in an alleyway (Frank Cotham), a comet denier dinosaur (Jessica Olien), trash in space (Roz Chast), a couple in basement counting babysitter money (Amy Hwang), a doctor’s brainy children (Paul Noth), and a possible game changer (Liam Walsh).

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch:  A–gasp!– redraw of Rea Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead design has been in place since the Spring of 2017.

If granted three cartoon wishes, one of them would be the return of Mr. Irvin’s work to its home of 92 years.  Read about the switcheroo here.

The missing masthead appears below.

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David Salle Incorporates Arno Drawings

From Creative Boom, January 20, 2020, “Vibrant paintings inspired by advertising and cartoons from The New Yorker in the 1950s” — this piece on David Salle (fabulously!) incorporating  Peter Arno drawings within his paintings.

Shown above: Mr. Salle’s “A Night In The Sky With Friends”

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 13, 2020

A few thoughts on the art in the latest issue of The New Yorker…

The Cover: a moment in a museum, courtesy of Bruce McCall (read a Q&A with him here). The second cover in a row with ( for me) a retro feel to it. I could see Charles Addams doing something like this, or the late great Richard Taylor (Mr. Taylor’s January 9, 1937 cover appears below right).

 

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons:

A lively bunch of cartoons: 18 of them — 19 if you include Olivia de Recat’s “Sketchpad” on page 17.  Possibly my imagination, but it appears most every cartoon has breathing space this week. There’s not one that looks cramped, nor is there one that looks like it would’ve been better off in a smaller space. Victoria Roberts’s peas in a pod (on page 21) is an excellent example of a drawing that required and received ample space.

P.C. Vey’s drawing (it’s on page 23) surprised me (always a very good thing). His unusual graveyard scenario accompanied by a terrif caption is a treat.

I like the sextet of cartoons that begins on page 40: Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell’s burning shorts drawing; Charlie Hankin’s magician (p.43); Lars Kenseth’s Charles Addamsy stomped-on cigarette butt drawing (p.44); Liana Finck’s sedentary whale (p.48); Sharon Levy’s abominable snowperson (p. 52) — which reminds me, pockets-wise of Arnie Levin’s great drawing (shown below) from the issue of December 26, 1977.  And, lastly, Ed Steed’s funny off-the-tracks drawing (p. 55).

Two drawings elsewhere in the issue also caught my eye: the fab P.S. Mueller’s drawing (p.65) with its use of the word “subsequent”… and Ellie Black’s dragon drawing (p.29). Hey, what can I say — I really like drawings of dragons, castles, etc..

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Mr. Irvin’s iconic Talk masthead remains under wraps. I don’t know how much effort it would take to return it to its proper place, but surely it can’t be more than a few clicks on a keyboard.

Read about Mr. Irvin’s masthead here, and see it below:

 

 

 

The Monday Tilley Watch, The New Yorker Issue Of January 6, 2020

The Cover: A retro cover! When I saw this attractive cover I immediately placed its style and structure in the early 1960s, and thought of a particular artist: the most prolific of all New Yorker cover artists, Arthur Getz. To illustrate, here’s Mr. Getz’s cover from December 18, 1965 side-by-side with this new one by Pascal Campion.

The Cartoonists:

The Cartoons: Some random thoughts on a few of the cartoons in The New Yorker‘s first issue of the 2020s…

There’s a duo effort by Jose Arroyo and Rob Kutner. Mr. Arroyo first began contributing to the magazine in 2008. Mr. Kutner is a comedy writer.

Really like Suerynn Lee’s breadcrumbs-on-a-trail drawing (it’s on page 28) — graphically appealing with a strong caption. Of the breadcrumbs-on-a-trail themed New Yorker cartoons over the years, here’s a favorite from the great Arnie Levin, published May 22, 2000.

Zach Kanin’s mounted python (on p. 36) is a hoot (or a “ssssssss”).  Mr. Kanin’s drawings always seem (to me) to contain some kind of Charles Addamsy-ish dna, which is a very good thing.

Can’t see a dog at a computer cartoon, such as Elisabeth’s McNair’s (p. 34) without thinking of  Peter Steiner‘s celebrated New Yorker drawing published July 5, 1993:  “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog.” It remains the most republished New Yorker drawing in modern history.

Joe Dator’s procrastinating writer cartoon (p. 39) is fun. The length of the caption — and the time it takes to read it —  becomes another element of delay.

The Rea Irvin Talk Masthead Watch: Last Monday, in this space, I held out the faint hope we might see Rea Irvin’s classic Talk masthead return to kick off the new year and decade. No dice. The redraw — plopped-in in the Spring of 2017 — is back after Ed Steed’s fun one-off in last week’s “Cartoon Takeover” issue.  Read more about the masthead here, and, as always (until something changes for the better… or worse!), here’s Mr. Irvin’s classic (sadly moth-balled) masthead…

 

From The Archive: A Ross Perot New Yorker Cartoon; Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoon & Cartoonist; The Village Voice & MAD

I haven’t done a whole lot of (obviously) political cartoons over the years. A Supreme Court drawing in the very early 1980s and a Bill Clinton drawing in the early 1990s come readily to mind.  Ross Perot, the two-time Presidential candidate who died today at age 89, was a humor magnet. Like so many other of the magazine’s cartoonists ( including Lee Lorenz, Liza Donnelly, James Stevenson, Peter Steiner, Arnie Levin, Mick Stevens, Dana Fradon, J.B. Handelsman, and Jack Ziegler) I couldn’t resist having a graphic go at him. The below appeared in The New Yorker issue of May 27, 1996.

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Today’s New Yorker Daily Cartoonist & Cartoon

Beach reading by Ellis Rosen, who has been contributing to The New Yorker since 2016.  Visit his

website here.

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The Village Voice & Mad

 

From The Village Voice, July 9, 2019, “MAD Magazine: Eclipsed By Madness? Looking Back On The Publication That Endowed America With a B. S. Detector”  — this piece by Jeoffrey O’Brien on MAD in The Voice over the years.

Cartoon Collection Of Interest: The Ultimate Cartoon Book Of Book Cartoons

We’ll have to wait til April for it, but judging by the “Look Inside” available on Amazon, The Ultimate Cartoon Book of Book Cartoons will be well worth the wait. Published by Princeton Architectural Press, the anthology was edited by New Yorker cartoonist, Bob Eckstein.

Mr. Eckstein has packed the pages with New Yorker contributors such as Sam Gross (whose drawing graces the cover), Danny Shanahan, Liza Donnelly, Peter Steiner, Roz Chast, Arnie Levin, George Booth, David Borchart, Ed Steed, John O’Brien, and many more (the full list is below).

If you love cartoons, books and bookstores, this is most definitely the collection for you.

Complete List of Contributors:

Marisa Acocella, George Booth, David Borchart, Pat Byrnes, Roz Chast, Frank Cotham, Liza Donnelly, Nick Downes, Bob Eckstein, Liana Finck, Alex Gregory, Sam Gross, William Haefeli, Sid Harris, Bruce Eric Kaplan, Robert Leighton, Arnie Levin, Bob Mankoff, Michael Maslin, Paul Noth, John O’Brien, Danny Shanahan, Michael Shaw, Barbara Smaller, Ed Steed, Peter Steiner, Mick Stevens, Julia Suits, P.C. Vey, Kim Warp, Christopher Weyant, Jack Ziegler.